Emigrants to Oregon in 1843
compiled by Stephenie Flora
oregonpioneers.com
copyright © 2004


Note: members of the second, third and fourth groupsare noted with the group number preceding their names. All other names are believed to be members of the main emigrating party to Oregon.

 

Captains of  1843

*1) Oregon Bound party piloted by John Gantt consisted of about 700 men, women and children and approximately 110 wagons; the party separated into two units consisting of those with larger herds of cattle and those without.  Those separated into numerous smaller units before the journey was over

*2) Joseph B. Chiles was returning to California after recruiting new settlers in the east; he was originally an emigrant of 1841.  The party was led by mountain man, Joseph Reddeford Walker.  "On or about September 20, 1843, a California-bound emigrant party consisting of twenty-five people and six wagons approached the Oregon Trail crossing of the Raft River.  Before they reached the river, however, they turned south and established what became the main route of the California Trail to the Humboldt River, via the Raft River Valley and Goose Creek.  They were led by mountain man Joseph Reddeford Walker, who had taken the route in reverse when he returned from California in 1834......." (Sign dedicating location was placed in 1992 by the Oregon-California Trails Association)


*3) Sir William Drummond Stewart's "party of pleasure" to explore the Rocky Mountains was guided by William Sublette; the party was made up of approximately 70 men consisting of twenty gentlemen of St. Louis that included socialites, army officers on leave and several scientists; there were were thirty hunters, muledrivers and camp servants; later joining the group was a missionary party guided by Solomon Sublette

 

*4) John Charles Fremont Expedition of 1843-44 consisted of 39 men, principally Creole, French Canadian and American as well as a father and son pair from the Delaware tribe; their company consisted of 12 carts drawn by two mules each and one wagon specially designed to carry the scientific instruments that would be used along the way; the expedition had a two fold purpose--to gather as much scientific information about the unexplored areas as could be obtained, and the other, more secretive plan, was to see if a good route to the Oregon country could be found; (Many members of the legislature at that time were of English descent and still maintained close ties with England. They did not wish to force a confrontation over the Oregon country by settling the area. Others wished to keep the land a possession of their new country. Fremont had been engaged by members of the later group to keep his eyes open for any route that could easily handle wagon traffic.) [Notations on particiapants taken from "Memoirs of My Life, John Charles Fremont, First Edition,  Cooper Square Press, 2001]

 

The Trail of 1843

Early in the spring of 1843 the emigrants bound for Oregon began to pour into Westport and Independence. After the majority were gathered together and just prior to beginning the journey, a meeting was called to form a set of "traveling" rules and to elect a council of nine to mediate any disputes that might erupt. It was decided that it would be best to elect officers when the train reached the Kansas River.

On May 22, 1843 the Oregon Emigrating Company departed with John Gantt as guide. Gantt had attained the rank of Captain in the US Army and had made his living in the fur trade and was more than willing to guide the train to Fort Hall for $1 per person. At Fort Hall it was hoped that assistance could be obtained from Dr. Marcus Whitman and party as they returned to the Oregon country from the states.

On June 1, after completing the crossing of the Kansas River, elections were held to determine who the officers were to be. Each nominee moved out with his back to the company. Backers of an individual then lined up behind their favorite candidate creating several lines of men stretching out across the prairie. The leaders, in jest, then proceeded to run across the prairie with their lines of supporters following like a long tail. The strange sight was captured in print by a writer passing by with the Sir William Drummond hunting expedition who remarked that, "Running for office is certainly performed in more literal fashion on the prairie ....." After the merriment, the end result was that Peter Burnett became Captain and James Nesmith was elected Orderly Sergeant.

As was true of each emigration, the exact numbers varied from person to person. According to an interview with Ninevah Ford in 1878, "We rendezvoused at West Port west of Independence, Jackson County, Missouri. We started from there in April. There were between 500 and 700 souls in the party and 113 wagons.......". Edward Lenox in his recollections claimed that less than 500 reached Oregon and set the figures at "295 men, 58 women and a possible 102 children...."; Mathew Field, a reporter accompanying the Sir William Drummond Stewart excursion, reported in his recollections "At Kansas Ferry observed gathering of 800 people for Oregon, having their election of officers...." Meanwhile, John Arthur in 1887 at an address of the Oregon Pioneer Association, stated that "the emigrating body numbered over one thousand souls, with one hundred and twenty wagons drawn by ox teams and over three thousand head of loose cattle and horses."

The company was soon to be involved in several severe storms that left them waterlogged and axle deep in muddy quagmires. Adding to the complaints, was the dissatisfaction created between those who had cattle and those who did not. After much dissension, Peter Burnett resigned. William Martin assumed command of the company without loose cattle. Jesse Applegate was elected leader of the "Cow Column", which consisted of approximately 60 wagons and a couple of thousand head of cattle.

Following behind, was Joseph B. Chiles, a pioneer of 1841, who was returning to California leading a small group of family and friends.

As with emigrations to follow, these rugged pioneers dealt daily with adverse weather conditions, lack of provisions, conflict of personalities and illness. To add to their afflictions, they did not have a wagon trail to follow. For a more comprehensive study of the emigration of 1843 I recommend reading "Blazing A Wagon Trail To Oregon, A Weekly Chronicle of the Great Migration of 1843" by Lloyd W. Coffman [see information on this publication at the end of this page].  I have included here my own compilation of events on this emigration in Emigration To Oregon in 1843


Emigrants To Oregon In 1843

Following is a preliminary list for the emigration of 1843. All additions and corrections would be appreciated.
NOTE: all female members of the emigration are listed by MAIDEN name [if known] even if they were married at the time of the emigration.

Agatha ADAMS was born Oct 1814 in North Carolina to George Adams and his third wife, Lydia Parker.  On September 10, 1841 while residing in Buchanan Co, MO she met and married widower, Bartholomew HALLEY.  The following year, their first son, George B. was born.  With a family consisting of several step-children (Mary Frances, John E. and Henry) and a new born son, the preparations began to head west.
  Following their overland journey the family settled in Clackamas County where James Clark (1845- ), Sarah Angeline (1846-), Lydia A. (1848- ) and Elizabeth Ruth (1849- ) were born.  By 1860 she is living with her husband and their children in  Salem, Marion County, OR.   Agatha and Bartholomew remained in the Salem area until their deaths, Bartholomew passing in 1883 and Agatha on June 4, 1888 at the residence of her daughter, Mrs. A. Kelly.  Both are buried in  Lee Mission Cemetery at Salem.

Henry Spencer AIKEN was born April 5,1818 at St. James Street, Liverpool, England.  He was the son of Joshua Aiken and Jane Pinkerton and although his parents were residents of  New Hampshire, they were visiting in England at the time of his birth. 
   His early years were spent in New Hampshire.  Later, as a young man, he first settled in Illinois before joining the migration west.  After his arrival in the Oregon country in 1843 he moved to Clatsop County where he is found residing in Astoria in the early census records.  In 1854 Henry married Maria, a young native woman who resided in the area.  The only known children for them were Jennie (1856-1878), Charlotte (1859-1881) and William (1870-).  Charlotte was listed as “deaf and dumb” on at least one census and in Henry’s obituary it is stated that she “is a promising student in the Mute school at Salem”.
   While residing at Astoria, Henry appears to have been a successful lumberman. He bought interest in a steam saw mill at Tongue Point (Marlin's mill) from Henry Marlin, March 13, 1851.  
   He also filled the position of Clatsop county clerk and was founder of Temple Lodge No 7, A.F.&A.M where he held numerous responsible positions.  At the time of his death he was one of the executors of the last will of Cyrus Olney, deceased.
   Maria died July 4, 1870 at Astoria and Henry died five years later on April 19, 1875.  Probate records indicate that Hiram Brown was appointed administrator of his estate.  Jennie, the oldest daughter, died at Good Samaritan hospital, Portland , in January 1878.  Charlotte died at the same location in 1881.  The family is buried at Hillside Cemetery, Clatsop County, OR

Mr. ALEXANDER: note--several members of the 1843 emigration traveled together to the CA gold mines. There is mention of an Alexander who was massacred in 1848 with other members of that party. This may be that individual

APPLEGATE FAMILY RESEARCHER:
Albert APPLEGATE
was actually born in the Oregon Territory December 6, 1843 at the abandoned Willamette Mission where his parents, Charles Applegate and Melinda Miller, wintered.  While not enumerated as an emigrant of that year he can certainly be considered a pioneer of that time period.  Albert married January 17, 1869 at Drain, Douglas County, Oregon to Nancy Johnson.  His adult years were spent in the Douglas Co area.  It was here that he raised his family: Mercy D. (1870), Nellie M. (1871), Jesse Grant (1873), Fred (1875) and Lulu (1878).  Albert died March 18, 1888.  After his death his wife, Nancy Johnson Applegate married James Shelley and was residing at Eugene, Lane County, Oregon in the 1900 census.

Alexander McClelland APPLEGATE
was born Mar 11, 1838 in St. Clair County, Missouri, the son of Jesse Applegate and Cynthia Parker.  He was five years old at the time the Applegates crossed the plains to Oregon in 1843. With his family he settled in Polk County in 1844 and in 1850 was living in Benton County.  By 1860 the family had moved to Yoncalla, Douglas County, OR.  Shortly after arriving, Alex went to the Idaho gold fields with Henry Lane, son of the famous Joseph Lane, who lived in nearby Roseburg .  He and Henry and Alex's cousin John Applegate enjoyed playing the fiddle together. They often played at dances as "The Fiddlers Three." Henry Lanehad been a suitor of Alex’s cousin, Harriet.  When the young men received the news in Idaho of the death of Harriet Applegate, Alex wrote home:  "Your dream that some of us who parted last spring would no longer meet again in this life has been fulfilled….You were right in supposing that we had heard of Harriet's death and there were but few dry eyes in the camp…Poor Henry Lane seemed to take Harriet's passing harder than any of the rest of us.  After we had all calmed down enough to go to sleep, we awoke far into the night only to see him sitting by the fire with his face in his hands."  In 1863 Alex married Isabel Estes.  They remained in Douglas County where they became the parents of  two sons: Henry (1865) and Winfield (1866).  Alex died Feb 1, 1902 in Douglas County, Oregon.

Charles APPLEGATE  was a native of Kentucky, having been born there January 24, 1806 to Daniel Applegate and Rachel Lindsay.  He was the eldest of the three Applegate brothers who brought their families to Oregon in 1843.   He had married July 30, 1829 in Cole county,Missouri to Malinda Miller.  They remained in Missouri, farming and establishing a family.  By the time they made the journey west the family included eight children with another one on the way: Lucy (1830), Susan (1831), Ellen (1832), James (1834), Mary (1836), Lisbon (1837), Irene (1839), and John (1842).   Albert was born soon after arrival in December 1843.  
   The family left Missouri with their most prized possessions, two wagons (each drawn by four oxen) along with ten cows and one horse.  Upon arrival in the valley Charles worked the first winter for the Willamette Mission blacksmith, Alanson Beer.   The next spring  he moved his family to Polk county and settled on a donation land claim.  In 1850 he is found residing in Benton county but by 1860 he had moved to Douglas county.   By this time, more children had joined the family: Harriet (1845), Thomas (1847), Jane (1848), Fanny (1850), George "Buck" Applegate (1852) and Milton (1854).  Including the infant who had died in 1841, Charles and Malinda were the parents of sixteen children.  
   In 1851 Charles and his brothers built a schoolhouse in Douglas county, installing James Applegate as teacher.  At a cost of $1000 they purchased from Harper’s Publishing Company of New York, a library, which was shipped around Cape Horn.
   Charles also gained some notoriety when he built a home that was divided in half.  One side was for the men and the other for the women.  This  home has been restored and is the oldest home in Oregon that is still owned by direct descendants. It is listed in the
National Historic Register and detailed drawings were made in 1934. These can be seen at  http://memory.loc.gov .  Lindsay moved his family away fromYoncalla, and the families of Jesse and Charles became distant. Charles died August 9, 1879 at the age of seventy-three and was buried at the Yoncalla Cemetery.  Melinda survived him by nine years.


Edward Bates APPLEGATE was born Nov 1833 in Missouri to Jesse Applegate and Cynthia Parker.  He was nine years old at the time of the crossing of the plains.  During the trip down the rapids of the Columbia River, the boat carrying Edward capsized.  He was drowned along with two others of the Applegate party, Edward's cousin, Warren Applegate and the close family friend, Alexander McClellan.  Their bodies were not found.  He had been the oldest son of the family.

Elisha “Lish” Lindsay APPLEGATE was born April 8, 1832 in St. Clair County, Missouri.  He was the eldest son of Lindsay Applegate and Elizabeth "Betsy" Miller.  In Missouri his mother had scolded him for sneaking off to swim.  She thought it dangerous, but it was his ability to swim that saved Elisha when the boat he was riding in was overturned in the Columbia River drowning his brother Warren, cousin Edward, and family friend, Alexander McClellan.  Elisha’s body had been beaten upon the rocks and many bones had been broken.   Some mended improperly and caused him great discomfort in later years. 
   The winter of 1843-44 was spent with his family in the abandoned Methodist Mission near Wheatland.  In 1844 he moved with them to Salt Creek in Polk County.  He was eighteen when the family moved to Yoncalla.  On August 1, 1861 he married Marie Isabel Marshall at Salem, Marion County, OR.
  
In the census records Elisha is listed as a carpenter and a surveyor but it appears he had many talents.  He was a staunch Republican and gained some renown as a writer for the People’s Press.  He was well known as a speaker and a simple story would never do if there was a way to embellish it.  However, the stories told about him would probably have stood up against any he told on his own.
“Lish Applegate had a yearling calf which he wanted to break.
  One day Applegate took the yearling out into a lane.  Not having a gentle ox with which to yoke up the calf, Applegate put the yoke on the calf’s neck and then the other end over his own neck.  The queer-looking couple started down the lane, at first slowly, and finally the calf broke into a run, dragging the old pioneer along at a rapid rate.  Meeting some men, Applegate called out: “We’re runnin’ off, goll-darn our fool souls.  Stop us! Stop us!”  But as nobody stopped the “fools,” they plunged into the Yoncalla River, where Applegate just escaped drowning.” 
  Another story revolves around how “Lish” Applegate saved the University of Oregon.  In 1872 when the question of a state university was raised, various towns felt they had the right to it.  A battle was waged.  The Legislature favored Eugene and stated that the college would be located there provided, by a certain date, the sum of $50,000 was “subscribed”.  In those days that was a vast sum of money for a little country village.  The committee having the matter in charge succeeded in getting about $35,000 subscribed in labor, board for workmen, lumber, nails, bricks, glass, lime etc.  But comb the entire county as they would, taking from the farmers garden truck, colts, mules, cows, poultry, butter and eggs—still less than two-thirds of the needed sum was in evidence on the subscription papers and the workers were in despair.
   They reckoned, however, without Lish Applegate.  Lish was one of those handy men who are never stumped.  For when the committee made known their troubles Lish said, “Gimme that paper.”  And seating himself on a store box he wrote in a bold hand, “Lish Applegate, $15,000.”  The day was saved.  Lish didn’t have a red cent but subscription was all that was asked for.  Of course, Lish never paid it, never paid a cent, but the alleged subscription tided them over, the Legislature was appraised that the amount was legally subscribed.  By the time the money was needed the committee was able to finish raising it and the university was located at Eugene.
  Lish Applegate was the father of Florence (1862), Francis (1864), Cynthia (1870).  He died December 1, 1896, another pioneer passing into history.

Ellen APPLEGATE ( was born  Nov 29, 1832 in Missouri, the daughter of Charles Applegate and Melinda Miller.  She resided with her parents until December 26, 1852 when she married George A. Burt.  By 1860 she is living with her husband  and children in Umpqua Co.  Ellen died December 6, 1867 at Yoncalla, Douglas county, OR.  Her husband is found living  at Yoncalla in the 1870 census.  They were the parents of Parrit (1855), John A. (1856), Henry H. (1858), Lucy A. (1860), Susan (1863), Fosco (1864) and Ellen (1867).   

Gertrude APPLEGATE was born in 1841 in St. Clair County, Missouri, the daughter of Jesse Applegate and Cynthia Parker.  She was the second daughter and seventh child of the couple and was two years old in the '43 migration.  The family settled in Polk County, Oregon, on Salt Creek in 1844.  When Gertrude was nine, the family moved to what is now Yoncalla, Douglas County, Oregon.  It was there that Gertrude grew to young womanhood during a time when the heated sectional controversy alienated neighbor from neighbor.  Her father was a staunch Unionist.  Their neighbors, the Drain family, were Southern sympathizers.  It was at the Drain home where Gertrude would meet James D. Fay, a charming young man whom she had met while away at school.  Fay became the city attorney for Corvallis, a hotbed of secessionist sentiment in 1860, and Fay became outspoken for the cause.  He then moved to Jacksonville, which was even more secessionist than Corvallis.  He regularly would take trips by stage from Jacksonville to Corvallis, stopping at the Spotted Horse Inn station, where a buckboard would be waiting to take Fay to the Drain home for his secret rendezvous with Gertrude. To Jesse Applegate, Fay was the spokesman for the cause of evil.  In October of 1864 Gertrude took passage on a southbound stage where she married James Fay in Jacksonville.  Gertrude wrote regularly to her family but no answers came, not even when she announced the birth of her son James Fay, Jr.  Jesse forbade anyone to mention her name in his home. In 1865 Gertrude was discovered to have the consumption, and as she deteriorated, she requested to go home to be with those she loved before she wasted away.  Her mother pleaded with Jesse, but to no avail.  It was 1867 before Jesse at last relented enough to allow his daughter and her baby to come for Cynthia to care for, but Fay was not to set foot in the Applegate home.  Gertrude's brothers rushed to help Fay lift Gertrude down from their carriage when they arrived at Yoncalla.  Cynthia rushed to the door saying, "All of you please come in! And take my girl upstairs to her old room.  Inside the door was Jesse Applegate.  Gertrude said to him, "Papa, I have come home to die."  Jesse sternly answered, "You have only come home to be nursed back to health by your good mother.  That is all you have come for."  He did not visit with her in her sickbed that day and stayed away entirely.  When the end was near, Gertrude requested to see her husband.  Apparently Jesse relented and Fay was permitted to visit his dying wife.  The next morning Gertrude asked to see her father, and they found him hoeing weeds in his orchard.  After some reluctance, he went into the house and up to Gertrude's room. No one ever knew what words transpired between father and daughter. Afterwards Jesse returned to his orchard alone and continued to hoe the weeds.  Gertrude was twenty-six years old when she died."  

Irene APPLEGATE was born March 20, 1839 in St. Clair County, Missouri, the seventh child of Charles Applegate and Melinda Miller.  She remained with her family through their various moves and, like her sister Lucy, she did not marry.  She remained in the old Applegate home in her later years, being cared for by her brother, George and his wife.  She died July 26, 1919 and was buried at the Yoncalla Cemetery

Ivan Decatur APPLEGATE was born June 25, 1840, in St. Clair County, Missouri, the son of Lindsay Applegate and Elizabeth "Betsy" Miller. He was three years old when his parents brought the family to Oregon.  He moved with his family to what later became Douglas County in the early 1850s.  He was in a party that rescued a wagon train from the Modoc Indians at Bloody Point in 1861. In 1862 he moved into the town of  Ashland, where he helped operate the toll road over the Siskiyou Mountains that his father operated. The following year he enlisted as a captain of the State Militia at Ashland. In 1868 he was appointed to take charge of the commissary in the Oregon Indian Department.  In this capacity he served as an interpreter for the Snake Indians while living on the Klamath Indian Reservation.   In 1870 he retired from public life but was called back into service the following year as a special representative to the Modoc Indian camp on Lost River.  While in that position he participated in the first battle of the Lava Beds and later was one of six men who risked their life to retrieve the bodies of citizen who had been slain by the Indians
.
  On July 14, 1871 he married Margaret Hutchinson in Jackson County.  She was twenty two years old; Ivan was thirty-one at the time.  Ivan and Margaret were the parents of five children: Alice (1872), Ada Florence (1874)., Moray Lindsay (1877),  Lena L. (1880) and Jessie.  Ivan died at the age of seventy-eight on December 28, 1918.  Margaret died eight years later on November 22, 1926. Both are buried at the Klamath Falls Cemetery, as are Ivan's brothers, Oliver and Lucien.  
     "
Aged Resident Met Death By Clothing Catching Fire--- A most distressing accident occurred in Ashland Saturday morning when Captain Ivan Applegate, one of the oldest and most respected citizens of this city, was burned so severely at his home on Granite street that death resulted several hours afterwards.
    The casualty occurred at an early hour in the morning when Captain Applegate arose and started a fire in the fireplace in the dining room of his home.  He was clad in his night clothing, over which he had donned a bath robe.  After kindling the fire Captain Applegate stood in front of the fireplace to get warm, and in some manner his bath robe caught fire and was a mass of flames before he discovered it.  His cries brought Mrs. Applegate to his aid, and she made a valiant effort to extinguish the fire which by this time had virtually enwrapped the aged man.
     The alarm was spread to Mr. and Mrs. Emil Peil who live next door, the latter of whom is a daughter of the injured man, and they hastened to the scene of the disaster, and succeeded in putting out the flames and called a physician who ministered to the injuries as far as possible.  The shock, together with the severe burns, proved fatal, however, and death followed at about five o’clock Saturday evening.
     Capt. Ivan D. Applegate was a pioneer among pioneers.  His residence in Oregon dates back to 1843, seventy-five years to the time of the laying of the first foundations for the building of a state on the Pacific Coast.  He often referred to the fact that his first recollections were at three years of age as he tugged at the ragged skirts of his mother on the turbulent voyage down the Columbia river rapids near The Dalles, where his elder brother and three others were drowned, on the last leg of the long journey across the unbeaten paths of the great American continent from the Missouri river to the land “where rolls the Oregon.”  The Applegate immigration of 1843 was the first extensive movement of settlers to this state from the middle west and the party numbering some eight hundred all told soon made its impress upon the great virgin territory, and its sturdy American citizenship was largely responsible for the rescue of the territory from British domination.
     At the head of this great immigrant party, which was organized and set out from Missouri, were the three Applegate brothers, Jesse, Charles and Lindsay, each of whom with their families have made a strong impress upon the history of Oregon.  Ivan was a son of Lindsay Applegate, who after some years spent in the Willamette and Umpqua valleys, located at Ashland, the old homestead comprising a large part of the present site of the city, the family dwelling having been located upon the lot which now is covered by the Elks temple.  Lindsay Applegate and his sons literally blazed the way and were conspicuous in opening up the immigrant trails thru this region and into southeastern Oregon and in safeguarding the later settlers who braved the dangers from hostile Indians and attendant privations in pioneering this section.  Lindsay Applegate in the early sixties became the first government agent for the Klamath Indians and his sons assisted him in establishing and maintaining friendly relations between the redskins and the white settlers who were gradually encompassing their homes and their hunting grounds.
     Ivan Applegate, schooled and trained in the ways and character of the aborigine and an adept in their language, became one of the noted Indian scouts of the region, and it is said that few if any white men ever gained and maintained their confidence as he.  He represented them in their conferences with the settlers, and was trusted to represent them in their dealings with the government.  He rendered important service to the government and people in the Modoc Indian war and it has often been said that if his counsel had been followed many of the horrors of that war would never have occurred.
     With the opening up and development of the great Klamath basin, Capt. Applegate engaged in the stock business there and operated upon quite an extensive scale, experienced the ups and downs of that business in the earlier days.  Energetic and active always, it is told of him that he recouped a modest fortune in the sheep growing business in the lava bed region near the state line after he had passed the age of seventy years.
     Sturdy and honest of character, keen of mind, typical of  Oregon pioneers, he was also broad and tolerant, loved the freedom of his country and its institutions.  He was proud of the state which he had seen grow and develop from infancy and loyal to his own home and community.
     A year or more ago Capt. Applegate sold out his stock interests in the Klamath country and removed to Ashland, the home of his youth, where he built an attractive home and sought to spend his remaining days with his devoted wife in peace and quietude.
     He is survived by his wife who before their marriage was Miss Maggie Hutchinson, daughter of one of the pioneer settlers of the Klamath region, and herself one of the first school teachers in Ashland, and by two daughters, Alice, wife of E. Peil of this city, and Lena, wife of W. O. Smith, editor of the Klamath Falls Herald, and by one son, Morey L., a planter in Mexico.  Three brothers, Jesse of Roseburg, Capt. O. C. Applegate, the well known citizen of Klamath Falls, and Lucian B. Applegate, also a prominent resident of Klamath county, as well as two sisters, Mrs. Alice Sargent, wife of Col. H. H. Sargent, U. S. A.retired of  Jacksonville, and Mrs. Rachel Alford, wife of M. L. Alford, city recorder of Medford, survive of the original Lindsay Applegate family.
     The funeral was held and interment made today at Klamath Falls." [Source: Ashland Tidings, Ashland,  Oregon, Tuesday, December 31, 1918, Page 1, Columns 3 & 4; contributed by Frank Dawes]

James APPLEGATE was born Aug 5, 1834, the son of Charles Applegate and Melinda Miller.  On January 25, 1859 he married Caroline Coffee Johnson at Bethel in Polk County. The couple moved to Douglas County where James farmed.  It was here that their children were born:  Josephine (1860), Mary (1862), Nancy (1864), Lulu (1866), Mabel (1867), Grace (1869) and Vincent W. (1874). By 1880 the family had moved to California and was residing at Goose Lake in Modoc County.  James died at Los Angeles,  California Aug 31, 1896.  He was described as having a medium build with brown hair and sandy whiskers; witty and quick in conversation

Jesse APPLEGATE was born July 5, 1811 in Kentucky, the son of Daniel Applegate and Rachel Lindsay. On Mar 13, 1831 in Cole county, Missouri he wed Cynthia Ann Parker.  The family continued to live in Missouri where Jesse worked for the Surveyor General’s office.  By the early 1840s the prosperous farm that he owned was beginning to fail due to the poor American economy.    Hearing of the opportunities in the northwest, the Jesse Applegate family along with the families of Charles and Lindsay Applegate, joined the emigration of 1843. Jesse was elected leader of the "Cow Column," the division of the immigration with larger herds of stock.  He wrote a reminiscence of that time called “A Day With The Cow Column” that is still available today.
  The brothers spent the winter of 1843-44 in the abandoned buildings of Willamette Mission twelve miles north of  Salem.  The following year they moved to sites on Salt Creek in western Polk County. They were there for six years before moving to what is now Yoncalla, in Douglas County. 
   Jesse was certainly the most prominent of the three Applegate brothers, but he was a complex man.  Along with Levi Scott and others, the Southern Route, also referred to as the Applegate Trail was established in 1846.  The emigrants of the first crossing faced many hardships and many placed the blame on Jesse Applegate for failing to ensure that it was accessible.  One of his most outspoken, critics was the attorney Jesse Quinn Thornton.  Yet Jesse Applegate was revered as the "Sage of Yoncalla."  He was a prolific writer and hardly an edition of any of the papers were published without containing a comment either regarding him or penned by him.  When his daughter ran off to marry a staunch Southern sympathizer, he refused to speak to her ever again.  It wasn’t until she called to him from her death bed that he relented and even then it was unknown what transpired between them because he never spoke of it. 
.  Jesse eventually lost his Donation Land Claim due to signing as a surety in an affair that failed.  Later he even lost his sanity.  
Jesse moved to California in 1872 and made enough money to return to Yoncalla, where he spent the rest of his life raising grapes.  His wife Cynthia died in 1881. After the death of his wife he went to live with his daughter, Sarah Applegate Long.  She reported that her father suffered from visions at night of all the relatives that had died before.  He would walk the floors late at night and slept little.  Jesse died in Yoncalla in Douglas county April 22, 1888 at the age of seventy-seven. 
   Jesse and Cynthia were the parents of  twelve children: Rozelle (1832),  Milton (d. MO), Alexander McClellan (1838), Robert Shortess (1839), William Henry Harrison (1841), Gertrude Applegate (1842), Edward Bates (1843), Daniel Webster (1845), Sarah “Sallie” (1848), Peter Skeen Ogden (1851), Ellen (1854) and Flora (1857).

Jesse Applegate APPLEGATE  was born November 1836 in Missouri to Lindsay Applegate and Virginia Watson.  Named in honor of his uncle Jesse Applegate, he was seen in most census records as Jesse A. Applegate.    Many years later, Jesse would write a memoir of the trip across the plains entitled, "Recollections of My Boyhood."  Jesse witnessed--with his one good eye-- the drowning of his brother Warren, his cousin Edward, and old Alexander McClellan, called "Uncle Mac" by the family, and the near drowning of William Doak and Jesse's uncle, William Parker.  Jesse spent the winter with his family in the abandoned buildings of the Willamette  Mission north of  Salem.  In 1844 the family settled on Salt Creek in western Polk County.  They were there six years before the family moved to Yoncalla in Douglas county.  Jesse studied law with the firm of Wilson & Harding in Marion Co and was admitted to the bar in 1864.  He was superintendent of schools in Polk Co 1863-64 and a member of the Legislature in 1865-66.
    Jesse and his wife Virginia had at least six children; the 1880 U. S. Census showed Jesse as age 43 living with his wife Virginia, 39, and three sons and three daughters between the ages of four and nineteen.  Jesse's last years were spent at the Soldiers' Home in Roseburg, Oregon, where he was completely blind.  He died in 1918 at the age of eighty-three, the same year as his younger brother Ivan. 

John APPLEGATE was born March 12,1842 in St. Clair County, Missouri, the son of Charles Applegate and Melinda Miller.  He was a year old when he joined the emigration of 1843 with his parents.  He enlisted in the Union Army in 1865 as a private in Company K, First Oregon Mounted Volunteer Infantry and served one year on the frontier.  Was well known at a fine “fiddler” and along with Alexander Applegate and Henry Lane, entertained at many a local function.  In 1874 in Douglas county he married Laura V. Bridges, the daughter of Rev. Daniel W. Bridges.  The couple resided at Yoncalla, Douglas county, Oregon until their death.  They were the parents of seven children: Annie Lola (1876), Bertha A. (1882),Emma Mary (1886), Charles D. (1884), Susie (1890), Gertrude and John Lindsay (1889)  .  John died January 2, 1912 and his wife died Feb 21, 1937.  

Lindsay APPLEGATE was born Sep 18, 1808 in Henry County, KY, the son of Daniel Applegate and Rachel Lindsay.  He was named Anthony Lindsay Applegate after his mother’s father but in the records he always appears as Lindsay Applegate.  As a young man he moved to St. Louis and in 1823 joined Ashby’s trapping expedition.  He served in the Black Hawk War as a volunteer under General Whitesides. 
  On January 13, 1831 in Cole County, Missouri Lindsay married Elizabeth Basham Miller.  She was the sister of Charles Applegate’s wife, Malinda.  The family resided in Missouri, raising their family.  In 1839, Robert Shortess, who had worked for Lindsay Applegate and Daniel Waldo at their mill on the Monagaw River in 1836-37, immigrated to the Oregon Territory.  The letters he sent back about the new land encouraged the Applegates and Waldos to join him.  Armed with his guidebook, the families joined the emigration of 1843. 
   Upon arrival they spent the first winter in the abandoned buildings of the Willamette Mission north of Salem.  The following spring they moved into what is now Polk County.  In 1846, Lindsay and his brother, Jesse, joined 13 other men to find a Southern Route into the Oregon Territory.  In 1850 Lindsay joined General Lane to pursue deserters from Fort Vancouver; served as special Indian agent under General Palmer and in 1853 commanded a company of volunteers during the Rogue River Indian War.
    In 1859 Lindsay purchased the toll road leading from Northern California to Southern California and went to reside in Siskiyou Mountains.  In 1861 he was the captain of a volunteer company to protect incoming emigrants and in 1862, a member of the Legislature representing Jackson county.  In 1864 Lindsay was an interpreter for the Klamath-Modoc Indian Treaty and served as a sub-agent until the military took over in 1869. He resided in Jackson county until his death on November 28, 1892.  He is buried in the Ashland Cemetery, Ashland, Jackson county, Oregon.
   Lindsay and Elizabeth were the parents of : Elisha Lindsay (1832), Warren (1834), Jesse Applegate (1835), Theresa Rose (1838), Ivan Decatur (1840), Lucien B. (1842), Oliver Cromwell Applegate (1845-1938); Annie Applegate (1847-1870); Frank Applegate (1850-1872); Alice Applegate (1852-1934); Jerome Applegate (1855-1856); and Rachel Lindsay Applegate (1857-1940)

Lisbon APPLEGATE was born Dec 29, 1837 in St. Clair County, Missouri, the son of Charles Applegate and Melinda Miller.  He was five years old during the crossing of 1843.  While crossing the plains, the boy, perhaps tired of walking on such a hot day, hid out in the wagon drive by George Beale, from whom the Applegate children had been told to stay away.  Beale would later commit murder, but even in 1843, it could be seen that he was an unsavory character.  Beale was driving the wagon up a steep hill, applying the whip heavily to the oxen.  At last they just stopped and the wagon began rolling down the hill backward.  Beale jumped out and the wagon crashed, dumping food everywhere.  Lisbon was crying and covered in flour, but no one then realized how seriously he was injured.    After his accidents, Lisbon began to periodically have seizures.  Then the seizures became a daily occurrence and before long he was confined to a wheel chair.  Finally, the boy that had so much promise became totally bed ridden and incapacitated.   Despite the loving care that was showered upon him, his ability to speak deteriorated and his attic room became his prison from which there was no escape.  On the 1870 census, beside his statistics was the notation “idiotic”. He died November 22, 1896 at the home of his deceased parents that he shared with siblings.  He was buried in the cemetery at Yoncalla.

Lucien B. APPLEGATE was born April 24, 1842 in St. Clair County, Missouri, the son of Lindsay Applegate and Elizabeth "Betsy" Miller. He was one year old when the family started for Oregon.  After settling in Polk County for a brief period of time, the family moved to Douglas County where they resided until shortly after the 1860 census was taken.  It was then that the family moved to the Ashland area in Jackson County, where his father operated the toll booth on the road over Siskiyou Summit. The family established a close relationship with the Indians both in Yoncalla and in the Ashland area. Lucien helped his father to establish the Klamath Indian Agency and Lucien himself became the superintendent of farming there for the Indians.  During the Civil War, Lucien was commissioned a major in the Oregon Volunteer Militia.
  On June 9, 1866, at Ashland, he married Margaret E. Grubb, who crossed the plains in 1852. In 1869 he moved his family to Swan Lake Valley in Klamath County where he worked 5,000 acres of hay and grain and raised livestock.  He prospered and in 1916 Margaret and Lucien celebrated their fiftieth wedding anniversary with family and friends on the Brookside Ranch where they had lived 46 of their 50 years together. They were the parents of six children: Elmer I. (1867), Minnie A. (1868), Fred L. (1871), Evelyn R. (1876), Bessie B. (1879) and Elsie T (1881). Margaret died in 1925 and Lucien died January 4, 1926.  They are buried in the Klamath Falls Cemetery, as are his brothers Ivan and Oliver."

Lucy APPLEGATE was born May 7, 1830 the daughter of Charles Applegate and Melinda Miller.  Lucy was the eldest daughter of the family and was well liked by all.  As a young woman, Lucy injured an eye, blinding herself in that eye.  After that her popularity with young men ceased, and Lucy never married.  
   Lucy was a hard worker and an avid gardener and could be found tending her vegetables and roses when she wasn’t tending the needs of the Applegate family.  She inherited the old Charles Applegate home upon her mother's death in 1888 and continued to live there until her death July 3, 1910 at the age of eighty.  Her obituary stated “Miss Lucy Applegate, an early Oregon pioneer who recently died at her home in Yoncalla…. All who looked upon her face after death said within their hearts `Dear Aunt Lucy,' for she was loved by all who knew her and many who did not know her heard much of her life work in caring for others and held her in high esteem.” 

Mary A. APPLEGATE was born January 6, 1834, the daughter of Charles Applegate and Melinda Miller.  February 18, 1857, at the age of 23, she married John Webster Perit HUNTINGTON.  In 1852 he went to the Yoncalla country where he took a land claim in the Hayhurst Valley near the Applegate family. Brilliant, versatile and well-educated, he taught school, practiced law, and in 1860 was a state legislator. In 1863 president Lincoln appointed him Supt. of Indian Affairs for Oregon, 1864-69. Selling his farm, he moved to Salem where he died June 3, 1869, less than two weeks after the death of his young son. After the death of her first husband Mary married John E. Wilson.  Mary died December 23, 1878.  Mary was the mother of two sons by her first husband: Benjamin (1859) and John Webster Perit Huntington Jr. (1861-1869).

Robert “Bob” Shortess APPLEGATE was born December 29, 1839, the son of Jesse Applegate and Cynthia Parker.  He was named in honor of Robert Shortess, a family friend who had emigrated to the Oregon Territory in 1839.  Robert married January 5, 1858 in Douglas County to Malinda A. Miller.  He died October 17, 1893 at Yoncalla.  Robert and Malinda were the parents of Aaron Purcill (1859), William (1861), Oscar (1863), Annie L. (1865), Catherine (1867), Edna (1870), Jessie (1873) and Ira (1875)

Rozelle APPLEGATE was born July 7, 1832 in St. Louis, Missouri, the oldest daughter of Jesse Applegate and Cynthia Parker.  After moving with her family to Polk County in the spring of 1844 she met Charles Putnam, a young printer from Lexington, Kentucky who had arrived with the emigration of 1847.  They were married shortly thereafter on December 12, 1847.  When the Applegate family moved to Douglas County the Putnams went with them.  They settled on a land claim and started a family that eventually reached eight in number: Charles (1848), Lucinda (1851), Horace (1852), Edward (1854), Gertrude (1856), Susan and Joseph (1858) and Ada (1860).
  
Rozelle Putnam was the first woman to set type in the Oregon territory.  Charles printed a small paper called The Oregon American and Evangelical Unionist.  Rozelle, like her sister Harriet, died of consumption.  Her husband sent her to her parents' home so her mother could nurse her.  She died at the age of twenty-nine.   Jesse and Cynthia reared the motherless children after their mother's death.  Charles spent much of his time at the Applegate home thereafter.  In 1862 he went to the Idaho gold fields with his Applegate brothers-in-law and cousins, also taking his eldest son, Charles Putnam Jr.

Susan APPLEGATE was born May 25, 1831 in Missouri, the daughter of Charles Applegate and Melinda Miller.  March 11, 1851 she married Robert C.H. SMITH, who was also an emigrant of 1843.  They settled in Douglas County where they farmed and raised their seven children: Richard (1852), Frances (1854), Robert Frank (1856), Jerome (1859), Ellen (1861), Albert (1864) and Elmer (1868).  Robert Smith died in 1888 and Susan died nine years later on December 30, 1907.

Theresa Rose APPLEGATE was born Feb 24, 1838 in St. Clair County, Missouri, the daughter of Lindsay Applegate and Elizabeth Miller.  April 20, 1868 she married Gen. John Marshall MCCALL.  They were the parents of Lindsay (1869), Lydia T. (1871), Elsie May (1873) and John O. (1875).  Theresa died Feb 9, 1875 in Jackson County, Oregon.  By the 1880 Jackson County census Gen. McCall had remarried Mrs. Mary Elizabeth Anderson.

Warren APPLEGATE was born c1834 in St. Clair County, Missouri, the son of Lindsay Applegate and Elizabeth Miller.  His family left the other immigrants at Fort Walla Walla, purchasing boats to navigate down the Columbia to Fort Vancouver.  The boat in which Warren was a passenger capsized, and he, his cousin Edward, and old family friend Alexander McClellan perished.  It was truly a tragic end to a gargantuan effort for the boy, who, like the others, walked most of the way to Oregon.  He died just before entering the promised land of the Willamette Valley.  For the Applegate family, half-starved, facing the rains of winter, it must have indeed been gloomy.  Warren's body and those of the others were never found.

William “Henry” APPLEGATE was born Feb 1844, some two months after arrival in Oregon, the son of  Jesse Applegate and Cynthia Parker.  While not enumerated as an emigrant of 1843 he certainly qualifies as an early pioneer of that time period.   He was living with his parents in Douglas County until 1871 when he married Nancy Elizabeth Grubb.  William is shown in most census records as Henry Applegate until 1900 and 1910 when he is listed as William Henry Applegate.  The 1910 census lists his occupation as dairy farmer.  Henry and Nancy were the parents of seven children:  Ernest (1875), Herbert (1876), Zoe (1878), Clarence (1880), Walter T. (1882), Chester A. (1883), and Roscoe (1888).  Henry died January 3, 1913 in Jackson county, OR.

ARTHUR FAMILY RESEARCHER:
Brazilla (Priscilla) ARTHUR
was born April 7, 1822 in Washington County, Kentucky, the daughter of  William Arthur and Millie Malone. She is seen in documents interchangeably as Priscilla and Brazilla.  On December 1, 1836 she married Edward Constable in Jackson County, Missouri.  In 1843 they joined family and friends to make the journey to the west.  They settled in Washington County where they farmed and raised their family.  Their children include: Mahala (1844), William (1845), Elizabeth (1846), Amanda Jane (1850), Richard (1852), Martha (1854), Mary (1856), Druscilla (1858), Melissa (1860) and Minerva Ann (1863).  Priscilla died at Hillsboro October 11, 1893.


John David ARTHUR was born March 5, 1820 in Washington County, Kentucky, the son of  William Arthur and Millie Malone.  When John was five years old the family moved to Jackson County, Missouri.   John later married Eleanor Malone on September 19, 1839 in Cass County.  Further mention of Eleanor has not been found so it is assumed she died young.  A little over three years later the family joined the emigration to the Oregon Territory.  In an article written and published in 1887, John states, “about the middle of May, in company with my parents, brothers and sisters, and with our wagons heavy laden with household goods, bidding a sorrowful and heart-felt adieu to kindred and friends, we set out upon the lengthy and fatiguing journey across the plains...."
   In the early days, wild animals in the area were taking a toll on the domestic stock of the pioneers.  John obtained, at great expense, a female hound from the most celebrated kennel in England and a male Cuban bloodhound.  These animals were in great demand for tracking bear, panther, wolf, wildcat and fox which were killing domestic stock. 
    In 1846, John married Mary Jane Malone, possibly the sister of his first wife.  The family is enumerated in the 1850 Clackamas County census but by 1860 they are living in Yamhill County.   Six years later Mary Jane filed for divorce against John and by 1870 he is living in Umatilla County with his brother, Robert.  Mary Jane and the children are living at Forest Grove next door to her brother, Richard.  In the 1880 census John has moved back to Yamhill County and is living in the household of Madison Malone.  In December of 1880 Madison Malone died and John moved once again; this time back to Clackamas County where he reportedly remained until his death.  It does not appear that he married again.
   John and Mary Jane were the parents of Rosetta E. (1849), Samantha (1852), Sophronia Gertrude (1854), Abbie E. (1857), Arcelia Alice (1861), and Eugene L. (1863)


Mahala ARTHUR was born February 4, 1829 in Jackson County, Missouri, the daughter of William Arthur and Millie Malone.  Mahala emigrated west with her parents and siblings in 1843.  Also involved in this adventure was one Samuel Cozine, a blacksmith who was seven years her senior.  They were married in Clackamas County on March 29, 1845.  The new family moved to Yamhill County where they raised their family.  They lived in the McMinnville area their whole married life.  Samuel died March 20, 1897 and Mahala died April 20, 1908.  Both are buried in the  Masonic Cemetery at McMinnville.

Mary "Polly" ARTHUR was born 1834 in Missouri, the daughter of William Arthur and Millie Malone.  Little is known of Mary.  In May 1843 the ship, Fama, arrived bringing Nathan P. Mack.  Nathan, aged 33, married the sixteen year old Mary in Clackamas County c1849.  They remained there through the 1860 census and then it is reported that the family moved to California where Mary died.

Melissa ARTHUR was born 1832 in Missouri, the daughter of William Arthur and Millie Malone.  Although Melissa is listed as an emigrant of 1843, no information has been found on her.  It is possible she was married shortly after arrival.

Richard Washington ARTHUR was born June 7, 1824 in Washington County, Kentucky, the son of William Arthur and Millie Malone.  A year after his arrival he married Laura Jane Mills on May 23, 1844 in Washington County.  The family settled in Washington County where they farmed and raised their family: Emily (1845), William Henry (1846), Robert B. (1847), John Wesley (1848), Julia Ann (1850), Margaret Jane (1851), Samuel Thurston (1853), Minerva (1855), Brittania Elizabeth (1857), Rachel Angliana (1859), Ida Mae (1863) and Richard Clay (1865).  Richard was a well known farmer in the area and received numerous awards for his livestock and crops.  He was active in the politics of the area and was on the board of the Washington County Agricultural Society.  He died July 22, 1869 at Hillsboro.

Robert ARTHUR was born in September 1826 in Missouri, the son of William Arthur and Millie Malone. Robert was sixteen when the family started for Oregon.  He resided with the family until Jul 27, 1847 when he married Catherine Maria.  They settled in Clackamas County where Robert was a farmer.  She died four years later in November 1851. They were the parents of  Eliza J. (1848),  Lucinda F. (1849) and John F. (1851).  Oct 28, 1852 Robert married Malinda Kelbourn in Clackamas County.   Malinda died c1863.   Robert and Malinda were the parents of William P. (1853), James R. (1855) and Lydia (1859). In the 1870 Umatilla County census Robert is enumerated with wife, Fidelia.  By the 1900 census they had been married 36 years.  At that time Fidelia was shown as the mother of six children but it appears they may have been from a prior marriage. Robert died January 8, 1903 at the Oregon State Hospital in Salem; Fidelia died three years later in Yamhill County.

William ARTHUR (1796-1866): m'd 1818 Emily "Millie" MALONE; settled Clackamas Co, wife died 1861 and he m2. 1862 Hicks (FOSTER), Catherine A.; emigrated with wife and 8 children; was guardian for Richard D. Malone, son of his sister, Matilda (Arthur) Malone; brought Richard with the family when they emigrated to Oregon; settled in Hardens, Clackamas Co, OR where he farmed and was active in local affairs; William died in Clackamas County Aug 14, 1866

William ARTHUR (1830-1907): m'd 1856 Martha Ellen COFFEE; s/o William and Mollie (Malone) Arthur; William settled at Hardens, Clackamas County, OR where he farmed until the death of his wife in the early 1860s; in 1870 and 1880 he is shown as a boarder in Yamhill county where he is a carpenter

James M. ATHEY (1816 - ): 1840 Nancy P. [maiden name unknown]; settled in Washington Co where he is shown in the 1850 census; by 1860 he is living and working as a carpenter and cabinet maker in Oregon City, Clackamas County; he remains there through the 1870 and 1880 census

William ATHEY (1818-1897): m1.; m2. Rachel (COOPER) Cave; went to CA after arrival in OR; returned to OR 1851; settled Yamhill Co;
""Bill" Athey was born in 1818, so he was twenty-five while crossing the plains to Oregon.  He was a furniture-maker and a farmer.  His Donation Land Claim was on Grand Island, an island in the Willamette River between Dayton and Salem.  His second wife was the widow Rachel [Cooper] Cave, a niece of Mary [Cooper] Matheny and Rachel [Cooper] Matheny of the 1843 immigation, who cross the plains in 1846.  The Atheys were flooded badly in the great flood of December 1861.  Grand Island was completely innundated and the nearby towns of Wheatland and Champoeg were destroyed.  The family then moved to Rachel's property in Polk County astraddle the Yamhill County line south of present-day Hopewell.  Rachel died in 1894 and Bill in 1897.  He was seventy-nine years old.  Both are buried in the Hopewell Cemetery." [information provided by Don Rivara. In addition to the present website his Sources included: [1] Into the Eye of the Setting Sun, the memoirs of Charlotte Matheny Kirkwood, an 1843 immigrant, cousin to Rachel Cooper Cave Athey.; [2] The William Athey file of the Hewitt-Matheny-Cooper Family Association at the Yamhill County Historical Society Museum in Lafayette.; [3] Overland to Oregon, pp. 48, 52,  by Edward Lenox, 1904, republished by Ye Galleon Press, Fairfield, Washington]

John ATKINSON : cutoff from Fort Hall for California with the Joseph Childs company; name also seen as J. Atcheson

J.C. AVERY: this may be Joseph Conant Avery who emigrated to OR in 1845. It is unknown at this time if he came first in 1843 but it is noteworthy that he settled in Benton Co along with many members of the 1843 emigration and there were several young men in the 1843 emigration who returned east to bring back family

*4) Alexis AYOT: member of Fremont's second expedition; also accompanied Fremont on his first expedition; engaged at St. Louis, MO

John M. BACON (1822-1891): m'd 1851 Rachel W. NEWMAN; member of the 1845 emigration; it is unknown at this time if he emigrated first in 1843;  there were several young men in the 1843 emigration who returned east to bring back family

*4) Francois BADEAU ( -1844): member of Fremont's second expedition; also accompanied Fremont on his first expedition; engaged at St. Louis, MO;  when party split he stayed with Fremont; on the return trip while camped on the Sevier River --"May 23, 1844 We had here the misfortune to lose one of our people.  Francois Badeau, who had been with me in both expeditions; during which he had always been one of my most faithful and efficient men.  He was killed in drawing toward him a gun by the muzzle; the hammer, being caught, discharged the gun, driving the ball through his head.  We buried him on the banks of the river."

Andrew Jackson BAKER (1822 - ): m'd 1857 Mary LAKE; 1832 to TN; 1835 to MO; settled in Yamhill Co; 1846 went to CA to fight in confrontation between the Americans and the Mexicans; settled in Yamhill Co; farmer

Henry C. BAKER (1840- ): s/o John and Catherine (Blevins) Baker; shown in the 1850, 1860 and 1870 census living in his father's household at McMinnville, Yamhill Co

James D. BAKER (1842- ): s/o John and Catherine (Blevins) Baker; shown in the 1850 and 1860 census living in his father's household at McMinnville, Yamhill Co

John Gordon BAKER (1818 - ): m'd 1839 Catherine BLEVINS; settled Yamhill Co; sheriff of Yamhill Co under Provisional Government and additional two years after Territorial Government organized; John is enumerated with his wife and children in the 1850, 1860, 1870 and 1880 McMinnville Pct of Yamhill County; by 1900 his wife is enumberated as a widow and head of household; John was the father of 7 children but by 1900 only 3 of them were still living

Nancy BAKER (1840- ): m'd Mathias GOULET

William BALDRIDGE : member of John C. Fremont party

Rachel BALES (1793- ): m'd 1811 Isaac MILLS; name also seen as BEALS; was born in Jefferson Co, TN where she later married Isaac Mills;  mother of 13 children

Layton BANE: listed on the 1843 scout list.  No records found on him

Louis BARGERIN : see Louis BERGEVIN

William BARKER: settled originally at Linnton

BEAGLE FAMILY RESEARCHER:
Cynthia Ann BEAGLE
(1843-1923): m'd c 1870 James H. TURNER; teacher in Polk Co in 1870; by 1880 was in Umatilla Co living with parents and working as a dressmaker; she was born just prior to emigration on 10 Jan 1843; buried in Holland, Illinois Valley, Josephine Co next to husbands family; husband was buried in Olney Cemetery, Pendleton, OR next to their infant son

George BEAGLE: see George BEALE

James H. BEAGLE (1840-1906): Never Married; s/o William and Lucinda (Thompson) Beagle; went to CA in 1854; returned to OR in 1862; worked in mines; mule packer; buried in Olney Cemetery, Pendleton, OR

John T. BEAGLE (1838-1905): m'd c1875 Nancy RIST (?); s/o William and Lucinda (Thompson) Beagle; mule packer in Umatilla Co until c 1875 when he moved to Loveland, CO; buried in Olney Cemetery, Pendleton, OR. John T. Beagle was born March 13, 1838 in Weston, Platte Co, MO and married Aug 12, 1871 Nancy Rist at Gilcrest, Weld Co, CO.  He came back to Umatilla, OR after his wife passed away in 1903, and is buried with his parents and two of his brothers in the Olney Cemetery.  He passed away Nov. 10, 1905.  John was the father of 5 children all born in CO (John, William, Nellie, Joseph and Charles.)  

Nancy Jane BEAGLE (1836-1914): m1. 1851 Mancil Roundtree CRISP; m2. 1891 Wayman Clark HEMBREE; d/o William and Lucinda (Thompson) Beagle; buried in McMinnville Masonic Cemetery, Yamhill Co, OR with second husband;
"Nancy Beagle was born in 1836, the daughter of William and Lucinda [Thompson] Beagle. She was seven years old at the time of the 1843 crossing of the plains.  The Beagles left their St. Clair County, Missouri, home with the Applegates for the rendezvous at Westport. There she and Charlotte "Lottie" Matheny [Kirkwood] and began a life-long friendship. In 1851 at the age of fifteen, Nancy  married Mancil Roundtree Crisp, who died in the 1880's.  In 1891 she married Waymon Clark Hembree, who had crossed the plains in 1843 with his family.  They lived in Lafayette, Yamhill County, Oregon. Nancy died in 1914 at the age of seventy-eight and was buried with the Hembrees in the Masonic Cemetery in McMinnville, Oregon. Waymon died in 1920."  [information provided by Don Rivara. In addition to the present website his Sources included: [1] Into the Eye of the Setting Sun, by Charlotte Matheny Kirkwood, published by the Hewitt-Matheny-Cooper Family Association, pp. 7, 32, 141; [2] Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints, on-line Family Search]

Oliver Hazzard Perry "Perry" BEAGLE (1833-1927): m'd 1852 Mary Melvina CRISP; m2. 1891 Mrs. R. E. CURTIS; s/o William and Lucinda (Thompson) Beagle; fought in Rogue Indian War and was a miner throughout CA and ID; periodically resided in OR as farmer and rancher; died while residing in State Veterans Home at Roseburg and is buried there.;
"Perry" was born in Kentucky on July 6, 1832, the son of William Beagle and Lucinda [Thompson] Beagle.  In 1843 the Beagles joined with the Applegates in St. Clair County, Missouri, and headed for the rendezvous to organize an emigrant party at Westport, Missoui. The family first settled in the Tualatin Valley upon arrival in Oregon.  While there, Perry attended the school at Forest Grove run by Tabitha Brown.  After the Whitman Massacre, the Whitmans' adopted dauhter, Matilda Sager, attended the school with him, as did the children of Squire Ebbert, Joe Meek, and David Lennox.  On April 27, 1852, Perry, age nineteen, married Mary Melvina Crisp, daughter of a Major Crisp, who had served in the War of 1812.  In 1855, during the Rogue River Indian War, Perry enlisted in the company of Capt. Joseph Bailey. In the fall of 1856, he and his family left their home six miles from Eugene and moved to Jacksonville, in Southern Oregon, where gold had been discovered. From there he moved to  Suisun City in Solano County, California, but lost his land there to the railroad. He then settled on the Russian River near Santa Rosa, California. From there he moved to Humboldt County, California, where he ran cattle. He and his brothers John and Jim participated in the Idaho gold rush in 1862, selling out his land in Humboldt County and moving his family to Yamhill County, Oregon. After awhile in the gold fields, Perry moved his family to La Grande, Oregon, where he earned a livelihood packing supplies by mule train to the mining camps.  He then sold out his mule train to his brothers and moved back to the Willamette Valley near McMinnville. In 1876 he moved to Paradise Valley near Moscow, Idaho. There, for fifteen years, he freighted goods from the railroad line to Moscow. After his wife died, he joined with his brothers Frank and Ben prospecting and running a mule train.  Later he and they bought a ranch together and raised cattle and horses for eleven years until they sold out and moved to Pendleton, Oregon. From there, he and a sister and two brothers moved to Virginia, but they were not happy there.  They returned to Oregon, where Perry settled in the Umpqua Valley. He married Mrs. R. E. Curtis in 1891 and outlived her as well.  He was ninety-five and living in at the Soldiers" Home in Roseburg, Oregon, in 1927 when Fred Lockley of the Oregon Journal interviewed him. He died that year and was buried in the cemetery there." [information provided by Don Rivara. In addition to the present website his Sources included: [1] Conversations With Pioneer Men, by Fred Lockley of the Oregon Journal, compiled by Mike Helm, 1996]

William M. BEAGLE (1808-1887): m'd 1831 Lucinda THOMPSON; s/o Thomas and Cecelia (Wine) Beagle; Beagle family settled originally at Linnton; later moved to Umatilla Co; buried Olney Cemetery, Pendleton, Umatilla Co, OR; William and Lucinda had four more children after arrival--Francis Marian, William M., Benjamin Edward and Mancil Alexander;
"Born in 1808, the son of Thomas and Cecilia [Wine] Beagle William was living in St. Clair County, Missouri, when he joined with the Applegates to head to the rendezvous at Westport for the 1843 emigration.  He had married his wife, Lucinda [Thompson] Beagle in 1831. Edward Lenox mentions that Beagle "sat up all night with Father [David Lenox] and doctored him." In Oregon the family first settled at Linnton, where West Linn now sits.  Later the family moved to Umatilla County, Oregon. There he was on the first town council of Pendleton, Oregon.  He is buried at the Olney Cemetery at Pendleton."  [information provided by Don Rivara. In addition to the present website his Sources included: [1] Conversations With Pioneer Men, by Fred Lockley of the Oregon Journal, compiled by Mike Helm, 1996, Rainy Day Press, pp.45, 48; [2] Overland to Oregon,by Edward Lenox, pp. 36, 60, Ye Galleon Press, Fairfield, Washington. [Originally written in 1904]]

BEALE FAMILY RESEARCHER:
George Polk BEALE
(1824-1865): s/o Charles and Anna (Kyle) Beale; returned east and emigrated again in 1852; became the first man hung in Salem when he was convicted of murdering Daniel Delaney Sr. for his money
The Hanging of Uncle George by Sarah Jane Bennett Mertz
The Murder Trial by Sarah Jane Bennett Mertz
"George Beale was a dark-skinned, black-eyed young man, the son of a slave-owner in St. Clair County, Missouri. He had been born in 1824 in Boutetourt County, Virginia, in 1824; so he was nineteen in 1843. In Missouri he taught school near the Applegates. Jesse A. Applegate had been hit with a switch by him while his student. In 1843 Beale was hired by the Applegates as a teamster to drive a wagon containing mainly flour and bacon. There was something not right about the man even in 1843.  The Applegate children were told never to ride in the wagon  he drove.  But Jesse A. disobeyed his parents and sat up next to Beale.  Beale became drowsy and Jesse took hold of the ox whip and was enjoying himself cracking the whip over the oxen when he slipped off the leather trunk he was sitting on and fell under the wagon and was run over.  Another time Lisbon Applegate sneaked into the wagon Beale drove and hid among the barrels.  They were going up a steep hill and Beale whipped the oxen to a fast speed.  Suddenly the wagon stopped and began to roll backwards.  Beale jumped off the wagon and the wagon rolled down the hill and crashed.  Lisbon was covered with flour and crying but no one realized then that the accident had ruined Lisbon's life.  
        Beale returned to St. Clair County, Missouri, after a few years in Oregon.  There he met his first wife, Sarah. They married March 12, 1848.  In 1852 Beale again crossed the plains and settled in Salem, Oregon.  His wife died in 1855.  He later married Mariah S. Taylor, who had crossed the plains in 1852 in the same wagon train as Beale.   In 1865 Beale was running a saloon in Salem.  He became obsessed with the money that Daniel Delaney, Sr. of the '43 migration had hidden somewhere.  He was determined to have it and manipulated a man named George Baker into helping him steal the money and killing Delaney.  They  were caught and hung in Salem.  People came from miles around to watch the hanging.  Beale, who professed to  have discovered Christ while in jail, read a Bible passage to the crowd before being hung then dramatically threw the Bible into the crowd saying he wouldn't need the book anymore.  After the hanging, the Salem Methodist establishement would not permit Beale to be interred in their cemetery, so Daniel Waldo also of the '43 migration, incensed by their refusal, told them,  "Well, I don't profess to be a good Christian like all of you.  I'll bury him at my place."  Beale's body was loaded onto Waldo's farm wagon and taken to  what is now called Waldo Hills east of Salem and buried on the Waldo land claim, where a white rose blooms every year to show where Beale lies.  Beale was forty-one at the time of his death, May 17, 1865.  Jesse A. Applegate, then an attorney in Salem, was fond of saying, "The only teacher who ever hit me got hanged."  One day his small daughter told her father after been struck by her teacher with a ruler, "My teacher hit me.  Why don't they hang her?' [information provided by Don Rivara. In addition to the present website his Sources included: [1] "'Recollections of My Childhood," by Jesse A. Applegate; [2] Skookum-An Oregon Pioneer Family's History and Lore, by Shannon Applegate, Beech Tree Books, William Morrow, New York, 1988]

William Kyle BEALE (1814-1869): s/o Charles and Anna (Kyle) Beale; was indicted on assault after attacking Dr. William Bailey; Bailey and Beale had spent the night drinking wine when an argument ensued; Beale left house but when Bailey went outside to investigate a noise he was hit on the head and stabbed in the shoulder; Beale was acquitted for lack of evidence; there is no indication that he ever returned east; served under Capt. Nesmith in a company sent to Southern Oregon to protect the settlers during the Indian uprisings.

*4) Oliver BEAULIEU : member of Fremont's party

Rachel BELDEN (c1833- ): m'd 1863 Nathan BROOKS; black girl who accompanied Mrs. Daniel Delaney as a companion; later married and raised a family in Salem; well respected

William BENNETT: to OR in 1843, wintered over and left for CA 1844

Louis BERGEVIN (1812-1876): m'd Magdeleine SERVANT; came from Canada in 1843 and settled near present day St. Paul, OR.; described as a prosperous man, generous with his neighbors and kindly disposed

*4) Jean Baptiste BERNIER : creole French; member of Fremont's second expedition; also accompanied Fremont on his first expedition; engaged at St. Louis, MO;  when party later split into two parties for exploration he stayed with Fremont

Nicholas BIDDLE : "Nicholas turned south at the Platte River to go to Taos, then a town of the Mexican province of New Mexico.  [information provided by Don Rivara. In addition to the present website his Sources included:[1] A Day With the Cow Column,  by Jesse Applegate, Ye Galleon Press, Fairfield, Washington, in the Appendix, a list of the heads of the families and men old enough to bear arms, prepared by James W. Nesmith, Orderly Sergeant]

David T. BIRD : wintered in OR and left for CA in 1844

George BLACK (1814- ):

J. P. BLACK .:

Mr. BLASER : this may be Joseph Blaser

BLEVINS FAMILY RESEARCHER:
Alexander BLEVINS
(1809-1896): m1. 1833 Emeline ZUMWALT ; m2. 1839 Levina VANDERPOOL; s/o Greenberry and Mary (Riley) Levins; settled originally in what later became Washington Co; by 1850 Alexander is shown in Polk county but by 1860 he is enumerated in the Contra Costa County, CA census; Alexander resided in California until his death in San Joaquin County Dec 24, 1896 Blevins Interview 1879

Catherine BLEVINS (1823- ): m'd 1839 John Gordon BAKER; Catherine was born in MO June 1823; her parents are unknown at this time; Catherine settled with her husband in Yamhill county and is found in the McMinnville Pct through 1850, 1860, 1870 and 1880;  by 1900 she is still in the same area as head of household so it appears John had died by this time; Catherine was the mother of 7 children but by 1900 only 3 of them were still living

Eli BLEVINS (1833- ): m'd 1858 Mary Jane GORDON; s/o Alexander and Emeline (Zumwalt) Blevins; 1850 Eli is living with father in Polk Co; 1860 he is living in Lane Co with his wife and son in the household of his father-in-law; by 1870 Mary Jane has remarried and no records on Eli can be found so it is assumed he has died by that time

Nancy BLEVINS (1840-1863): m'd 1858 William GARRETT; d/o Alexander and Levina (Vanderpool) Blevins; Nancy is living with her parents in Polk County in the 1850 census but by 1860 she is found living in Contra Costa, CA with her husband; she reportedly died in 1863

William Riley BLEVINS (1842-1937): m1. 1868 Louisa POTEET; m2. 1892 Lavina WHITE;  s/o Alexander and Levina (Vanderpool) Blevins; is found living with parents in Polk County in 1850; by 1860 living in Contra Costa County, CA;  in 1880 he is living in Douglas County and appears to have returned to California at some point as he died there Aug 28, 1937 in Placer County, CA; it is believed he was divorced from his first wife; buried in Old Auburn Cemetery, Auburn, Placer Co, CA

John BOARDMAN : traveled with a pack company led by Joseph B. Chiles that turned off at Fort Hall for California; at Fort Boise, a group of horsemen from the party turned southward via the Malheur River to explore a way into northern California; at this point Boardman, Johnson and Winter continued on to Oregon by the established route; Utah Historical Society Quarterly Vol II p.99-121 "Journal of John Boardman"

N. BOGGART:

Henry BOGGUS : (name seen spelled as Baggas, Boygus, etc.; believed to have emigrated again in 1845 via the Meek Cutoff; was one of 15 men to explore the possibility of a Southern Route

Jean Baptiste Zacharie BOLDUC ( -1848): left Canada for the west via Cape Horn in 1842, arriving the next year; after mission to Puget Sound he took charge of the newly established Boys' School at St. Paul, Marion Co; the school closed during the gold rush and never reopened; died in Marion County in 1848

Ruby Crawford BOND (1808-1900): m'd 1827 Jesse LOONEY; d/o Jesse and Susannah (Crain) Bond; gave birth to stillborn twins on the trail; settled with husband and children near Jefferson, Marion Co, OR; was of a wealthy Revolutionary War family and a direct descendant of George Walton, one of the signers of the Declaration of Independence; member of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church;  described as a "woman of much strength of character and one possessing strong mental qualities....was very entertaining and witty.  She was blessed with a remarkable memory and upon her 91st birthday she declared she was the youngest one there"

Pierre BONNIN (c1816 - ): m'd 1846 Louisa RONDEAU; m2. 1855 Rose WAGNER; m3. 1865 Salome RAYMOND; emigrated from Montreal, CN; settled at St. Paul, Marion Co where he raised his family until 1880 when he moved to Lewis Co, WA

Almeda BOYD (1820-1872): m'd 1840 John MANNING;  Alameda married John Manning after the death of his first wife (Lovisa Collier). She went to CA in 1849 with her husband and several of their children.  The family is listed in the 1850 and 1860 Sonoma Co census records.  Almeda died in Sonoma Co in 1872 and John in 1873

L. T. BOYD (1832 - ):

Levi BOYD :

Thomas BOYER (1834- ):

James BRAIDY : (also seen as James BRADY); reportedly deceased by 1853

George BROCK (1812- ): m'd c1836 Martha [maiden name unknown]; enumerated in 1850 Washington Co, OR census records as George Brock; name also listed as George Brooke and George Brooks in some sources

John Privity BROOKS (1821-1865): m1. 1849 Mary Ann THOMAS; m2. 1856 Isabelle MCKAY; s/o Dickerson and Hannah (Kemp) Brooks; John P. Brooks was b. 19 Oct 1821 in Worcester Co, Mass; became one of the first public school teachers; participated in the first newspaper; his petition for divorce from Mary Thomas Brooks states that his said wife at this time is "labouring under a secondary symptom of the veneral disease"... and it is "impossible for said petitioner to bear longer with his said wife".. (note: the doctors wife, Mrs. Bailey, voiced her own opinion as to how said wife got the disease); however, his marital entanglement was solved by an unusual night meeting of the legislature that voted him a divorce; his business association with the firm of Brooks and Barlow was discontinued when the business was destroyed during the great flood; he moved to Washington Co where he died Dec 1865

Martin T. BROWN (1822-1851): m'd 1850 Lucy B. RICHARDSON; enumerated in 1850 Benton County, OR census living next door to Benjamin Richardson; died in August 1, 1851

Orus BROWN (1800-1874): m1. 1825 Theresa DAVIS; m2. 1833 Lavina WADDELL; s/o Rev. Clark and Tabitha (Moffatt) Brown; returned to MO in 1845 and brought family to Oregon in 1846; resided in Washington Co for 20 years; moved to Marion Co and resided there until his death; (also see 1846)

Thomas A. BROWN:

 Peter BURNETT FAMILY RESEARCHER:

Anna May BURNETT : m'd Frank MARTIN

Armistead L. BURNETT (1839-1862): m'd 1860 Flora M. JOHNSON; s/o Peter and Harriet (Rogers) Burnett; removed to CA in 1848

Dwight Jay BURNETT (1829- ): m'd 1849 Mary Susan WILCOX; s/o Peter and Harriet (Rogers) Burnett; removed to CA in 1848

John May BURNETT (1837-1916): m'd 1863 Ellen Theresa CASEY; s/o Peter and Harriet (Rogers) Burnett; removed to CA in 1848

Martha Letitia BURNETT (1834-1908): m'd 1851 Caius Tacitus RYLAND; d/o Peter and Harriet (Rogers) Burnett; removed to CA in 1848

Peter Hardman BURNETT (1807-1895): m'd 1828 Harriet B. ROGERS; s/o George and Dorothy (Hardeman) Burnett; prior to his emigration in 1843, Burnett was a store-keeper whose business depended on the farm trade, business was poor and his wife was suffering from ill health; decided to travel to Oregon country; traveled with wife, six children and three wagons; elected captain at Kansas River crossing; after one week was succeeded by William Martin; settled in Clackamas Co; laid out town of Linnton in winter of 1843-44 with M.M. McCarver; in 1848 organized a "California Party" at Oregon City which included 150 men and 50 women; first American governor of California; recollections published in "Recollections of An Old Pioneer"

Romietta Jewett BURNETT (1835-1910): m'd 1853 William Thompson WALLACE; d/o Peter and Harriet (Rogers) Burnett; removed to CA in 1848

Sallie Constantia BURNETT (1841-1861): m'd 1860 Francis POE; d/o Peter and Harriet (Rogers) Burnett; removed to CA in 1848

Amon BUTLER : not found in the 1850 census; was listed in some sources as Amos Butler

Joseph Willard BUZZELL : m'd 1844 Frances Margaret KELSEY; m2. 1859 Mary MOORE; Joseph went to CA and settled near Stockton where he built Buzzell's Tavern, one of the first stopping places in the area. He reportedly died May 1864, at sea off the coast of San Mateo, CA

*4) John A. CAMPBELL : member of Fremont's party; turned back for home on September 22; note, there appears to have been two John Campbells

*4) John G. CAMPBELL : m'd 1846 Rothilda E. BUCK; member of Fremont's party;  became a partner with Ransom Clark in his first farming venture in Yamhill Co; moved to Portland, Multnomah County where he was partners with Smith in a store;  it was above his store that the first Mason's Lodge was chartered in Nov 1850; appointed by Dr. Robert Newell to be Indian Agent for the Nez Perce Indians at Lapwai Agency

*[4] Christopher "Kit" CARSON : joined the Fremont Exedition at a little Mexican pueblo on the Arkansas River;  when party later split into two partys for exploration he stayed with Fremont

Catherine CARY (1840-1843): d/o Miles and Cyrene (Taylor) Cary; died Aug 15th at Fort Bridger after a short illness

Miles CARY (1811-1858): m'd 1831 Cyrene B. TAYLOR; settled at Lafayette in Yamhill Co; reportedly brought a black slave girl with them but she is not enumerated in the household by the 1850 Census

Miles R. CARY (1843-1872): s/o Miles and Cyrene B. (Taylor) Cary; Miles was born Jan 2, 1843 and was just a baby during the emigration;  he is shown at home and unmarried in the 1850, 1860 and 1870 Yamhill Co census; Miles died Feb 22, 1872 and is buried in the Masonic Cemetery, Lafayette, Yamhill Co, OR

William H. CARY (1840- ): s/o Miles and Cyrene B. (Taylor) Carey

Adoniram "Ad" Judson CASON (1829-1892): m'd Eliza J. GLOVER; s/o Fendall and Rebecca (Holladay) Cason; settled at Oregon City, Clackamas Co; farmer ; " Ad was Clackamas Co bridge superintentdent" [information provided by John Ridgeway]
"Adoniram crossed the plains in 1843 with his parents.  They settled on land that is now part of the city of Gladstone in Clackamas County, Oregon.  Adoniram inherited the portion of the land with his parents'  home on it when his father died in 1860.  "Ad" built a new home there in 1861-62, using some of the lumber from his parents' old home.  This house still stands.  He was a gunsmith and had a shop at the north end of the old toll bridge where the present 82nd Street Bridge now stands.  He had bought the bridge from Charles T. Kellogg.  Ad and his wife had five children:  Homer Cason, Charles Cason, George Cason, Katherine Cason, and Addie Cason.  Ad wanted to insure his children's education, so he built a small school on his property in 1869.  This portion of the Cason land is now Chataqua Park in Gladstone."  [information provided by Don Rivara. In addition to the present website his Sources included: [1] "The old Cason-Cross House, Gladstone, 1861-62," by Gertrude Oswald, pp.44-45, Oregon Historical Landmarks, published by Oregon Society Daughters of the American  Revolution.]

Benjamin Franklin CASON (1842-1865): s/o Fendall and Rebecca (Holladay) Cason  

Fendall Carr CASON (1799-1860): m'd 1822 Rebecca Rawlings HOLLADAY; settled at Oregon City, Clackamas Co; Fendall  was born Oct 12, 1799 in Henrico Co, VA and died at Gladstone, Clackamas Co, OR;  he is buried at Mountain View Cemetery, Oregon City, Clackamas Co, OR; death date given for his headstone was given as 1862 but his estate papers indicate he died in 1860; "known as Carr to his family, he was a gunsmith and operated a toll bridge over the Clackamas River; the bridge later washed out in a flood in 1872, floating down stream all the way to Kalama, WA; member of territorial legislature for Clackamas 1853-1854" [information provided by John Ridgeway]         
"Fendal Cason and his wife Rebecca Cason traveled with their children...   They settled on land in what is now East Gladstone, Clackamas County, Oregon.  Fendal died in 1860.  A buckeye tree planted by Fendal Cason graces the home built by his son Adoniram on the original Donation Land Claim."  [information provided by Don Rivara. In addition to the present website his Sources included: [1] "The old Cason-Cross House, Gladstone, 1861-62," by Gertrude Oswald,  Oregon Historical Landmarks, published by Oregon Society Daughters of the American  Revolution.]

Frances Caroline CASON (1824-1883): m1. 1845 Dr. John Edwin LONG; m2. William B. CAMPBELL; d/o Fendall and Rebecca (Holladay) Cason

James Pulliam CASON (1832-1887): m'd 1853 Mary MARSH; s/o Fendall and Rebecca (Holladay) Cason; James was b. Jan 5, 1832 in Howard Co, MO; he died Sep 6, 1887 at Shutler Flat, Gilliam Co, OR;  James is buried at Arlington, Gilliam Co, OR; wife was a survivor of the Whitman Massacre ; settled in Clackamas Co; later moved to Morrow Co where Cason Canyon is named for him

John Lewis CASON (1836- ): m'd 1860 Mary E. STRAIGHT; m2. 1875 Bettie B. CRIGLER; s/o Fendall and Rebecca (Holladay) Cason; wife was a daughter of Hiram Straight, also a pioneer of 1843

Joseph Holladay CASON (1833-1856): s/o Fendall and Rebecca (Holladay) Cason; died in California

Rebecca Rawlins CASON (1826-1863 ): m'd 1842 Peter Grant STEWART; d/o Fendall and Rebecca (Holladay) Cason  

R. James CASON : enlisted in Oregon Rangers Mar 16, 1844 and was appointed Lt. April 3, 1844; relationship to Fendall is unknown

Thomas Benton CASON (1840- ): s/o Fendall and Rebecca (Holladay) Cason; "Tom was a famous marksman and Indian fighter; pursued by Indians in Idaho, he built a small fort of loose rock and stood a siege; he killed 16 of his attackers before a rifle ball found its way through a crack in his fort and terminated his heroic defense and life" [information provided by John Ridgeway]

William Alexander CASON (1828-1865): s/o Fendall and Rebecca (Holladay) Cason; settled Multnomah Co; served as Capt. against Yakima Indians 1855-1856

CATON FAMILY RESEARCHER:
Jesse H
. CATON (1819-1863): m'd 1848 Precious STARR; s/o Noah Lafayette and Frances (McDermid) Caton; settled in Benton county where he was enumerated in the Corvallis, Benton Co Census in 1850 and 1860;  in the 1860 census he described himself as a "gentleman of leisure"; Jesse died in Union County, OR June 15, 1863

Jacob CHAMP :

*4) Manuel CHAPMAN : member of Fremont's party

William CHAPMAN:

Alfred CHAPPEL :

James CHASE :

Moses CHILDERS :

*2) Joseph Ballinger CHILES: original emigrant to California in 1841 with the Bidwell-Bartleson party. Went east and led party back in 1843 [see 1841 list];
"Joseph Ballinger Chiles, the leader of the California-bound emigrants in 1843,  was the son of Henry Chiles and Sarah [Ballinger] Chiles and the grandson of Revolutionary War Patriots Capt. John Chiles and Capt. Richard Ballinger, both of Virginia. Joseph also descends from Walter Chiles of Jamestown, Virginia who arrived in America in 1637. There is much written on Joseph in "Walter Chiles of Jamestown" by Joanne Chiles Eakin, "California Trail Blazer" was written a few years back and gives his story. It was commissioned by his granddaughter. Joseph is also talked about in "California Trail" by George Stewart. Joseph was born in Clark County, Kentucky but moved with his family to Jackson County, Missouri  around 1830. He fought in the Indian Wars in Florida and returned to Jackson County after they were over. Joseph was married first to Mary Ann Stevenson in Clark County, Kentucky. They had four children: James Ramsey [called Joe Jim], Frances, Elizabeth [Lizzie], and Mary..He then went to California in the Bartleson-Bidwell party, the first wagon train to make it over the Sierra Nevadas in 1841. Joseph was a widower and had left his four children in the care of his brother, Joel Franklin Chiles, and Joel's wife Azubah Skinner Chiles. He made seven trail blazing trips back to Jackson County. He eventually remarried in Jackson County and brought his new bride, Margaret Jane Garnhart, and his children to Chiles Valley [next to Napa Valley], California. From his second marriage he had five children: William Garnhart Chiles, Amelia Jane Chiles, Susan Anna Chiles, Dixie Virginia Chiles, Joseph Ballinger Chiles, Jr., and Henry Lee Chiles.There are three of Joseph's homes still standing. Two are in the Napa Valley and one in Chiles Valley. Joseph's daughter, Mary Chiles, married his business partner, Jerome Davis, for whom Davis, California is named. Through the years, many Chiles nephews joined their uncle. Some stayed in California.  The mill stone which Joseph brought over the Sierra Nevadas and placed in his mill in Chiles Valley is on display outside the State Capitol in Sacramento. Among Joseph's accomplishments are establishing the trail from Fort Boise to California by way of the Malheur, Pit, and Sacramento Rivers in 1843.  In 1848 he also led one of the first wagon trains to cross Carson Pass. Another accomplishment was pioneering the cut-off from Humboldt Sink to the Carson River;  this route was known as the "Forty-Mile Desert," a route that became popular with gold seekers in 1849.  Joseph transported a mill stone across the Sierra Nevada Mountains and established a flouring mill on his ranch in Chiles Valley, a feat which landed him seven Spanish leagues from the Mexican government.  He was among the founders of Yolo County, California, and had a beautiful home in Sacramento at one point.  It was there that  he went into the ferrying business with his future son-in-law, Jerome Davis." [information provided by Don Rivara. In addition to the present website his Sources included: [1] Joyce Chiles Hines,  great great grandniece of Joseph Chiles]

*3) Mr. CHOTEAU : several members of this family were among the gentlemen members of the Stewart Party

*3) Jefferson CLARK : son of General William Clark, was with Stewart hunting expedition

*4) Ransom CLARK (1808-1859): m'd MILLICAN, Lettice Jane; member of Fremont's party; settled in Lafayette, Yamhill Co where he was a merchant;  was involved in forming a Mason Lodge at Lafayette; the lodge received its charter in 1851;.moved to Oregon City cDecember 1854; died in 1859 leaving a widow and two small children, Willie age 2 and Lizzie age 6

Andrew CLARNO :

James CLINE :

Lancaster CLYMAN (1817-1907): m1. 1837 Malvina GERRARD; m2. 1844 Mary MANNING; m3. 1871 Charlotte JONES; m4. Elizabeth [maiden name unknown]; s/o Bennet and Matilda (Lancaster) Clyman; nephew of James Clyman; father of 8 children; settled in Yamhill Co until the gold rush years when he moved to CA and ran a freighting business between Sacramento and the mines; shown in the 1850 Sonoma Co, CA census; was reportedly a 'dead shot with a muzzle loader' at turkey shoots; was quite well to-do at one point until his involvement in horse racing broke him; died in Sonoma County Feb 17, 1907

Rev. Thomas COCHRAN (1820-1898): m'd c1844 Susan GURLEY; appears to have turned back to OH; first son was born in 1844 in OH;  also appears in the 1850 Sandusky Co, OH census records as a physician and the 1880 Jo Daviess Co, IL census as a minister;  died in Marion Co, OR in 1898 and is buried in Lee Mission Cemetery, Salem, Marion Co, OR 

Charlotte Sophia COLCORD (1817-1846): m'd 1841 Peter H. HATCH; Charlotte was a sister to John N. Colcord, a seaman who had returned to Maine from the Hawiian Islands, on his return to the Islands his sister accompanied him; Charlotte was well educated and became a teacher at the Methodist Mission in Honolulu where she met and married her husband; the family emigrated to the Oregon country in 1843 on the old whaling bark "Fama"; they settled in Clackamas Co where Charlotte died on the Tualatin Plains in 1846

James CONE :

Benedict CONSTABLE (c1812-1845): s/o Robert and Elizabeth (French) Constable; turned off at Fort Hall for California; died in Sacramento, CA in 1845

Edward CONSTABLE (1817-1895): m'd 1836 Priscilla ARTHUR; s/o Robert and Elizabeth (French) Constable; turned off at Fort Hall for California; had returned to OR by 1847 and was residing in Washington Co where his 10 children were born; buried West Union Cemetery, Washington Co, OR

COOPER FAMILY RESEARCHER:
Lewis C. COOPER
. (1799-c1864 ): m'd 1841 Elizabeth Ann LINEBARGER;   mentioned several times in the Nesmith Diary as Lyman C. Cooper; settled in Washington County and is enumerated there in the 1850 census; by the mid 1850s had moved to CA where he is enumerated in the 1860 Fresno County, CA census; he died there c1864

Mary COOPER: m'd Daniel MATHENY Sr.

Rachel COOPER (1803- ): m'd 1822 Henry MATHENY; settled Yamhill Co; husband died in CA 1849

John S. COPENHAVER (1822- ): John is enumerated in the 1850 and 1860 Washington Co census;  in the 1860 census he has a boy, assumed to be his son, age 8, living with him and there is an Elizabeth Copenhaven (sp), age 5/12 living with the A. Hill family in the same area;  it appears that perhaps he married between 1850 and 1860 and his wife died;  John is not found in the 1870 census

*4) Philibert COURTEAU : member of Fremont's party

John COX (1822- ): m'd 1844 Amelia "Millie" GAGE; shown in 1845 Tuality Co census; by 1850 was living in Polk Co and 1860 and 1870 was residing at Looking Glass, Douglas Co, OR

Mary Ann Caroline COZINE (1841-1887): m'd 1862 Francis KEYES; d/o Levi and Sarah (Keizur) Cozine; father died in 1841 and mother emigrated with her family as a widow; mother died in 1850 and Samuel Penter became her guardian (note: this surname is also seen as CORZINE)

Samuel COZINE (1821-1897): m'd 1845 Mahala ARTHUR; settled in Clackamas Co on arrival; 1845 moved to Yamhill Co where he is listed as a blacksmith in the 1850, 1860, 1870 and 1880 census

Susan Jane COZZART (c1792-1856): m'd David KELSEY Sr.; to OR 1843; 1844 to CA with husband; husband died of smallpox shortly after arrival; Susan returned to OR to live with her son, Isaiah; Susan became blind after suffering from smallpox

D CRAGAN.:

*4) M CREELEY.: member of Fremon't second expedition; turned back for home on September 22

*4) Michel CRELIS: member of Fremont's second expedition

*4) William CREUSS: member of Fremont's second expedition; turned back for home on September 22

CRISP FAMILY RESEARCHER:
Lucinda CRISP
(1811-1877): m'd 1827 Elijah Ellison MILLICAN; d/o William and Hannah (Wilson) Crisp;  settled with husband and family in Yamhill Co, OR

Daniel CRONIN :

George DAILEY:

Sarah DAMRON (c1818-1908): m'd 1833 Thomas OWENS; d/o Moses and Jennie (Mullins) Damron; had just given birth in February 1843; assisted in the birth of a baby girl to Mrs. Olinger; was of German descent; *9 1900 p.65-82 Recollections of Sarah Damron Adair, Pioneer of 1843  Sarah Damron Owens, pioneer to Oregon

Burrell DAVIS ( -1848): shown in 1845 Tuality Co Census as single; appears to have died in Yamhill Co in 1848

J. H. DAVIS :

Thomas DAVIS: see notes on Thomas Davis in 1838 list.

Mr. DAWSON: cutoff from Fort Hall for California with the Joseph Childs company;

V.W. DAWSON: member of John C. Fremont second expedition;

William DAY ( -1843): arrived sick and died at Fort Vancouver

*4) Clinton DEFOREST: member of Fremont's second expedition; turned back for home on September 22

DELANY FAMILY RESEARCHER:
Daniel DELANY Jr.
(1826-1913): m'd Eliza Amanda WALTERS; s/o Daniel and Elizabeth (Magee) Delany; settled in Marion Co, OR where he was a prominent farmer in the area; he died in Marion Co in 1913

Daniel DELANY Sr. (c1795-1865): m'd 1820 Elizabeth MCGHEE; was a prominent plantation owner from Tennessee; his murder in Marion county resulted in the first hanging ever held in Marion county; brought his black slave, Rachel, to Oregon with him; settled near Turner, OR; buried at Cloverdale Cemetery, Marion Co, OR; wife and remaining children came in 1845
   The st
ory of the murder and the ensuing trial can be viewed at
The Hanging of Uncle George by Sarah Jane Bennett Mertz and
    
The Murder Trial by Sarah Jane Bennett Mertz

David DELANY (1828-1905): m1. 1855 Jane EDGAR; m2. 1889 Matilda Jane SAGER; s/o Daniel and Elizabeth (McGhee) Delany; enumerated in Marion Co census for 1850 and 1860;  later became a prosperous citizen of Farmington, WA

John M.  DELANY ( -1866): s/o Daniel and Elizabeth (McGhee) Delany; remained in East Tennessee; was killed in the Civil War

William DELANY (1824 -1899): m'd 1851 Cassandra E. MCKOIN; s/o Daniel and Elizabeth (McGhee) Delany; emigrated with father, met mother and younger brothers at Independence Rock in 1845; returned east after the 1850 census and returned to OR again in 1852; settled in Marion Co where he remained until 1880 when he is enumerated in the Linn Co Census; died at Coburg, Lane Co, OR in 1899

William C. DEMENT (1823-1865): m'd 1846 Olive JOHNSON; settled in Clackamas Co; founder of Oregon City Woolen Mills and Oregon City Railroad; father of 7 children; was a merchant; opened grocery store in 1851; was Whig candidate for Sheriff in 1852, which he won but resigned before year was out; lost two building and the flour inside when they burned in 1861 fire; elected director of Oregon City Woolen Mills in 1864; died at Oregon City Jan 9, 1865; widow continued to live in Oregon City until 1880 when she moved to Oakland, CA

*4) Jean Baptiste DEROSIER: member of Fremont's second expedition; when party later split into two partys for exploration he stayed with Fremont; after suffering and privation in the mountain snows "March 1, 1844 Derosier did not get in during the night.......We began to be uneasy at Derosier's absence, fearing he might have been bewildered in the woods......We were happy to see Derosier appear in the eveing.  He came in, and, sitting down by the fire, began to tell us where he had been.  He imagined he had been gone several days, and thought we were still at the camp where he had left us; and we were pained to see that his mind was deranged.  It appeared that he had been lost in the mountain, and hunger and fatigue, joined to weakness of body and fear of perishing in the mountains, had crazed him."  March 22, 1844 while camped at Sutter's Fort "Derosier, one of our best ment, whose steady good conduct had won my regard, wandered off from the camp and never returned to it again, nor has he since been heard of."

*3) Father DEVOS: Catholic priest; left group at the Little Sandy beyond South Pass; left for the "Flatheads"

Luther DICKERSON: brother of Nancy; started to Oregon in 1843 with a number of families from near Bloomington, IA but turned back and remained at St. Joseph, MO until spring of 1844; see 1844 list

Nancy DICKERSON: m'd James WELCH; started to Oregon in 1843 with a number of families from near Bloomington, IA but turned back and remained at St. Joseph, MO until spring of 1844; see 1844 listing

William DOAK (c1821-c1848): m'd c1845 Mary HOBSON; barely escaped death by swimming to shore when boat capsized in the rapids near The Dalles; "Some were thrown onto rocks and some went down with the rapids. One man named Doak who could not swim, he was thrown on a feather bed and flung on a rock. He remarked afterwards that he always like feather beds"; daughter that was born in 1846 is shown in the 1850 census living with her grandfather, no mention of her parents are found so it is assumed they are deceased

Solomon DODD:

*4) Jacob DODSON: 18, strong and active, and nearly 6 feet tall, was of good colored people, born free; member of Fremont's second expedition;  when party later split into two partys for exploration he stayed with Fremont

Nancy DODSON (1813-1886): m'd 1835 Capt. Absolom J. HEMBREE;
"Nancy Dodson was born June 22, 1813 in Warren County, Tennessee.  She was twenty-four when she married Absalom Jefferson Hembree in January of 1835 in White County, Tennessee. Traveling with Nancy and Absalom in 1843 were their children: Ann E. Hembree, 3; and their son William Jasper, an infant born in late 1842 or early 1843.  The baby died crossing the plains.  In Oregon the Hembrees had other children: James Lawson Hembree, 1845; Absalom Jefferson Hembree II, 1853; and Lillian May Hembree, 1854.  During the Indian Wars of 1855-1856, Absalom  enlisted.  He was killed and scalped on April 10, 1856, at Status Creek, in Yakima County, Washington. Nancy survived him by thirty years, dying in 1886 in Lafayette, Oregon." [Information provided by Don Rivara]  

William DOKE: see William DOAK

Jacob DORAN (1812- ): m'd 1851 Amanda [maiden name unknown]; married in Tuality/Washington Co; had settled on his donation land claim #4732 in Polk Co by Nov 1852; wife died in 1855 leaving him with 2 small children

Dorcus D0UGHERTY (1816-1887): m1. 1838 Daniel RICHARDSON; m2. 1844 Sidney W. MOSS; first husband died at Fort Hall during the emigration of 1843; she continued on to Oregon with her 2 children and settled at Oregon City, Clackamas Co, OR where she resided for the remainder of her life

John DOUGHERTY (1820- ):

William P. DOUGHERTY: m'd 1846 Mary Jane CHAMBERS; native of Washington, Washington Co, PA; a party left Platte City, MO May 5th consisting of  William Martin, William Sheldon, W.P. Dougherty, Lindsay Tharp and Parson Reading and arrived at Fitzhugh Mill, a place of rendezvous for those wishing to go to Oregon; was appointed Justice of the Peace of the Provisional Government in 1844; went to the CA gold mines in 1849; moved to the Puget Sound country in 1850 where he served as county commissioner and probate judge; father of four boys and four girls

James DUNCAN:

*4) Frederick DWIGHT: member of Fremont's second expedition; gentleman of Springfield, Mass who later visited Sandwich Islands and China by way of Fort Vancouver

John W. EAKER :

Elizabeth Jane EAST (1841- ): m'd 1857 Richard S. PERKINS; d/o John & Elizabeth (Kelsey) East; settled in Polk Co where they are shown in the 1860 and 1870 census

Isaiah EAST: s/o John & Elizabeth (Kelsey) East

Jesse EAST (1842- ): s/o John & Elizabeth (Kelsey) East; settled in Polk Co; appears in that county through the 1880 census; does not appear to have ever married; not found in the 1900 census

John O. EAST (1837- ): s/o John & Elizabeth (Kelsey) East;  appears in that county through the 1880 census; was not married by that time; not found in the 1900 census

John Wesley EAST (1810-1878): m'd 1836 Elizabeth KELSEY; John was born in VA;  he married Elizabeth in 1836 in St. Clair Co, MO where they remained until they emigrated to OR in 1843;  John obtained a donation land claim in Polk county and is enumerated in that county until his death in 1878; he and his wife are both buried on a knoll above their last home on Perrydale-Ballston hwy

Susan EAST (1839- ): m'd 1854 Andrew H. WHITLEY; d/o John & Elizabeth (Kelsey) East; in 1880 Dallas, Polk Co, OR census Susan is listed as head of household, divorced, with a daughter and son living with her

EATON FAMILY RESEARCHER:
Charles EATON
(1819- ):  Charles was born in NY and is probably a brother of Nathan listed below; settled in Thurston Co, Washington; in 1860 he is living there with his children, the youngest age 2 years old and no wife; in 1870 he is listed as a stockman and has 1 son living with him and he has no wife listed; by 1880 he is not found in the census and it is presumed he is deceased

Nathan EATON (1824-1883): m'd 1872 Lestina Zylpha HIMES; Nathan was born in NY in some records and in Erie Co, PA in others; is probably a brother of Charles listed above; settled in Thurston Co where he is found in 1860 and 1870 unmarried; 1880 he is enumerated with a wife and 4 children

EBERMAN FAMILY RESEARCHER:
Ninian Alkanah EBERMAN
(1821-1896): m'd 1850 Emma HOBSON; s/o John and Sarah (Hagler) Eberman; Note-some records show name as Everman; emigrated to OR in 1843 accompanied by Benjamin Wood; appears he returned east and emigrated again in 1846 with brother Crockett; went to CA gold mines; was in party who were mining on American River about 15 miles from Coloma on the middle fork at a place later called Murderer's Bar; when the camp ran out of provisions, Ninian, his brother Crockett and Humphrey O'Brien journeyed into Coloma to restock; upon their return they found Ben Wood, Thompson and Alexander had been massacred by the indians; later settled at Clatsop Co where the birth of his 15 children took place; reportedly Ninian was paralyzed in later years and he burned to death when he overturned a lamp while home alone

Elbridge Gerry EDSON (1823-1889): m'd 1848 Mary "Polly" GARRISON; s/o Bezabel and Deborah (Money) Edson; settled in Yamhill Co; house burned in 1850; rebuilt and remained there; "Eldridge was a young man hired by Daniel Matheny to drive one of Matheny's four wagons to Oregon.  On Thursday, June 5, 1843, James Nesmith mentioned in his diary, "…Tonight the council assembled to settle some difficulty between John B. Howell and Elbridge Edson [sic].  Circumstances too numerous to mention." In her memoirs, Charlotte Matheny Kirkwood told of Edson's teasing the five-year-old Charlotte that he had traded her to an Indian who was proffering  a buffalo robe in front of them. Eldridge was born in 1823 in New York. He settled in Yamhill County, Oregon. There he married Mary "Polly" Garrison, daughter of Enoch Garrison.  The Garrison family had been on the trail in 1843 also. There is a record in New York of an Eldridge Edson having fought for the Union during the Civil War.  This may have been our subject, but it could be a kinsman with the same name. Later Eldridge and Polly moved to Washington Territory.  The 1880 Census found him working as a miller and living at Bishop's Creek [present-day Bishop], Inyo County, California. Polly died prior to 1880. Living with Eldridge at that time were his son Arthur Edson, age 21, who had been born in Oregon, and his son Charles Edson, age 13, who had been born in Washington Territory. Both sons were farm workers."  [information provided by Don Rivara. In addition to the present website his Sources included: [1] Our Proud Past, by Gail I. McCormick, self-published, p. 12 [James Nesmith's Diary of 1843, extracted from the Oregon  Historical Quarterly, December 1906]; [2] Into the Eye of the Setting Sun, by Charlotte Matheny Kirkwood, p. 13, pub. by the Hewitt-Matheny-Cooper Family Assoc.; [3] Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, on-line Family Search]

M.  EELLS: on some lists for 1843. I believe this may be a reference to Myron Eells whose family came to OR in 1838

EMERICK FAMILY RESEARCHER:
Solomon EMERICK
(1821-1899): m'd 1845 Luceta ZACHARY.   Solomon returned east and emigrated again in 1848 with Joseph Watt party; settled Tuality Co, later Washington Co; farmer; volunteer in Cayuse War;  " Solomon was born November 30, 1821, in Montgomery County, Ohio.  After arriving in Oregon, he married Mary Zachary, also an 1843 immigrant, on June 17, 1845, in Cornelius, Washington County, Oregon.  Solomon had been living in Forest Grove up to that time, but he settled that year on what is now the southern part of the town of Cornelius on the Tualatin River. During the 1850's, when there were few or no roads, steamboats navigated up the Tualatin River as far the Emerick Donation Land Claim.  The wharf there was called "Emerick's Landing." Solomon and Lucetta returned east and again crossed the Oregon Trail with Solomon's parents, Christian Emerick and Catharine [Weem] Emerick.  Catharine died on the trail near the Bear River in Lincoln County, Wyoming.  Solomon's father remarried in Oregon, dying in Cornelius on January 20, 1851.  Solomon was a farmer, and he served in the Cayuse War to avenge the deaths of Marcus and Narcissa Whitman. He died February 6, 1899, in Fletcher, Lewis County, Idaho, a few months before his wife Lucetta.  Both are are believed to be buried there, although the Emerick Family Cemetery in Cornelius is  located in T1S R3W. " [information provided by Don Rivara. In addition to the present website his Sources included: [1] Growth of Early Cornelius Due to Arrival of Railroad,an on-line article,  original transcript by Eric Stewart for the News-Times]

Ann ENYART (1819-1884): m'd Anderson SMITH; settled in Washington Co; Ann was the mother of (Elijah, Abner, John G., James W., Alexander, Nancy A., Sarah E., Benjamin, Edward, Mary)

James ETCHELL:

Ninian EVERMAN: see Ninian EBERMAN

EYRE FAMILY RESEARCHER:
Amelia EYRE
(1834- ): m'd Charles F. RAY; d/o Miles and Eliza (Turner) Eyres; after death of father the family was transported from the Snake River to Whitman's Mission where they remained through the winter; May 1845 transported to Oregon City and from there to  Marion Co; during 1846-47 the girls were placed in a boarding school

Eliza EYRE (1831- ): d/o Miles and Eliza (Turner) Eyres; after death of father the family was transported from the Snake River to Whitman's Mission where they remained through the winter; May 1845 transported to Oregon City and from there to  Marion Co; during 1846-47 the girls were placed in a boarding school; Eliza is enumerated with her mother in the 1850 Marion Co census

Mary EYRE: m'd John SINCLAIR; settled in CA; d/o Miles and Eliza (Turner) Eyres

Miles EYRE ( -1843): m/d Eliza TURNER; Englishman described as unsocial and disagreeable, camped away from company; drowned in the Snake River while trying to cross with a mule team; all the families money was strapped to his chest when he drowned, leaving his widow and children destitute; his body was never recovered;
"Edward Lenox states in his recollections, "We soon came to the treacherous Snake River, where we lost two of our men, Ayres and Stringer.  Seeing the difficulty which I had in crossing, and discouraged by the hardships of the ford at this point, they insisted upon keeping the left side of the river, with the intention of making a crossing farther down at Fort Boise.  They were compelled to cross before they reached the point which they had in view, by the closing in of the canyon.  Ayres, who was an old man about sixty, got into trouble with his mule in crossing the stream.  Stringer, who was about thirty years of age, went to his relief, and both of them were drowned in sight of their women folks whom they had ferried across.  The bodies were never recovered.  Stringer's father with Ayres' son with the women folks, managed to make their way on until they struck our trail which they followed through to the Columbia River."[information provided by Don Rivara.]

Thomas Turner EYRE (1829- ): m'd 1858 Abbie COFFIN; s/o Miles and Eliza (Turner) Eyres; appears in Clackamas Co in 1847 filing for a land claim; by 1850 he appears in Marion Co where he remains until 1870 when he appears in the Mariposa Co, CA census working in a mill with no wife or children listed; 1880 he appears in the Summit Co, CO census with wife Mary E. and appears to be working in a mine

Stephen FAIRLY: listed as an emigrant of 1843 in the Transactions of Oregon Pioneers; no further information has been found on him

E. A. FARWELL: turned off for CA in 1843; left Sutter's Fort 12 May 1845 for home; letter regarding trail to California published in Missouri Republican 05 May 1846.

Charles E.  FENDALL(1822 -1894): m'd 1848 Amanda ROGERS; s/o William Edward Fendall.  Charles rode horseback most of the way and acted as one of the hunters.  He settled in Yamhill Co where he farmed until his death on 20 Apr 1894.  He was the father of 13 children (William Oscar 1849-1849, George Frazer 1851, Riley Yates, 1852, William Edward 1854, Philip Richard 1857, Frances Alice 1858, Elbridge Gerry 1860, Charles Lee 1865, Nathan C. 1865, Laura E. 1867, Annie Kyle 1870, Frank Sitton 1871 and Frederick D. 1874).  Charles  is buried in Buck Hollow Cemetery, Willamina, Yamhill Co, OR

*3) Matthew C. FIELD: reporter with Sir William Drummond Stewart's "party of pleasure" hunting expedition; journal, "Prairie and Mountain Sketches" was edited and published in 1957 by Kate L. Gregg and John F. McDermott

*4) Thomas FITZPATRICK: guide for Fremont's second expedition; had been in the Oregon country at various times throughout years; was a well know mountain man

FORD FAMILY RESEARCHERS:   Nineveh Ford Family
Ephraim FORD
(1819-1863): m'd 1851 Martha Jane GARRISON; buried in the South Yamhill Baptist Cemetery, near McMinnville, Yamhill Co, OR along with his two small children (John Ellison 1856-1857, Wilber C. d. 1861)
Settling in Yam
hill County, Oregon, Ephraim married Martha Jane Garrison [Nov. 8, 1836-Oct. 6, 1925], the daughter of Rev. Abraham E. Garrison, an Oregon pioneer of 1846.  Martha Jane's two uncles, Enoch and Joseph M. Garrison were on the 1843 wagon train with Ephraim.  Ephraim died September 25, 1863, after losing control of the horses pulling his carriage.  He jumped out of the carriage to avoid crashing, but he broke his leg.  Gangrene set in, and the limb was amputated, but he died following surgery.  Martha Jane gave birth to a son after her husband's death on April 15, 1864, but the baby died four days later. Martha Jane later married Aaron Knight Olds.  She survived Ephraim by sixty-two years, dying at the age of eighty-eight.  They had the following children:  Ephraim N. Ford; Mary Ann Ford [Booth]  1854;  John Ellison Ford (1856-1857); Cyrena Margaret Ford [Fletcher], 1858; Martha Eveline Ford, 1862, [married to George Washington Ford, perhaps a cousin]; and Wilbur Chandler Ford [1864-1864 one source says 1861]
        In his memoirs, Ephraim's father-in-law told this story.  In January of 1867 [this year is wrong--Ephraim died in 1863; Garrison probably meant 1857], the Methodists held a very protracted meeting in McMinnville.  Attending were Ephraim and his father-in-law Rev. Abraham Garrison. When Rev. Spencer was preaching, Ephraim jumped to his feet and told the preacher to get out of the pulpit that he could beat him preaching.  The preacher told him to be quiet, telling him he could have an opportunity to speak after the preacher was done.  With much difficulty Rev. Garrison got his son-in-law to sit down.  He had always been a very pious man, but now Ephraim had suddenly become insane.  Soon he required several men to guard him night and day.  One time the men had to tie him to prevent him from committing violence.  It was finally concluded that Rev. Garrison would take him to Stockton, California, where the only insane asylum in the West existed at that time.  The men had a hard time getting Ephraim into a carriage to take him on the first leg of the trip to catch a boat.  On the boat Ephraim attempted to jump off.  Finally they got him to Portland.  At a hotel in Portland the varied topics of conversation in the lobby seemed to mellow Ephraim because he couldn't take just one topic and develop irrational thoughts before the topic was changed. Garrison took him east to the Cascades, probably to enlist the help of Joseph M. Garrison and his sons to help take Ephraim to California.  By the time the boat started back to Portland, Ephraim seemed improved. Garrison told his son-in-law that he intended to take him by sea to the mental hospital, but if he continued to improve he would not do so.  Ephraim did improve and even helped his father-in-law load a trunk onto the boat to go home to Yamhill County.  He was so improved that Rev. Garrison let Ephraim walk the last two miles to his home.  It was likely a very happy reunion that Martha Jane had with her now-sane husband. The total period of his insanity was about two months." [information provided by Don Rivara. In addition to the present website his Sources included: [1] Life and Labour of Rev. A. E. Garrison, 1887, Pages 64-66 & 122,  memoirs of Abraham Garrison, father-in-law to Ephraim Ford 

John Fulton FORD (1818 -1875): m'd 1842 Reeda Ann KEIZUR; brother of Nimrod Ford; settled in Marion County where he resided until his death by paralysis at age 57; buried at Salem Pioneer Cemetery, Salem, Marion Co, OR

Nimrod FORD (1817-1865): m'd Mrs. Mary Jane KANDALL; brother of John Fulton Ford; was member of small party organized by Dr. Whitman to travel in advance of wagon train; settled in Marion County; victim of the Willamette River flood of 1861, family  had to be rescued;  remained in Marion County until his death at age 47years 2 months of typhoid pneumonia; buried at Salem Pioneer Cemetery, Salem, Marion Co, OR

Ninevah FORD (1815-1897): m'd 1848 Martha Jane SIMPSON; served in two Indian Wars, represented Oregon in Congress 3 terms, moved to Walla Walla Valley in Umatilla Co in 1859, later moved to Walla Walla, WA; father of 11 children; Ninevah loved dandelion salad and brought dandelion seed with him to ensure that he would have plenty of dandelions *per Ford Researcher; "Recollections" UCBL ms. 33pp;
"Somewhere near the crossing of the North Platte, we camped at a place called Soap Springs. It was a boggy place….Nineveh Ford's big black ox blundered into one during the night.  In the morning, he was found and pulled out before Nineveh was up.  He was covered, all but his head, with the thick blue mud.  Nineveh made a great fuss when he could not find his big black ox.  Everyone else hooked up.  There was a lone blue ox grazing about that no one seemed to claim, and Nineveh was asked if it were not his.  He said, 'No.  My ox is black.'  Finally he was advised to take it anyway;  perhaps the owner had yoked up the black ox by mistake.  There seemed nothing else to do, Nineveh, mad as a hornet, went out to catch the ox while everyone looked on and laughed.  After awhile Nineveh laughed about it, too, but not at first. He was still too mad at the man who had taken his big black ox."   Nineveh Ford lived for many years in Polk County, Oregon.  Afterward he lived in Walla Walla County, Washington.  There he and some other farmers were involved in a lawsuit and then the destruction of a dam constructed by a miller who deprived the farmers of their water from the Little Walla Walla River.  The farmers were arrested for their actions, but their punishment is unknown." [information provided by Don Rivara. In addition to the present website his Sources included: [1] Conversations with Pioneer Men--The Lockley Files, by Fred Lockley, compiled by Mike Helm, pp. 49-50; [2] pp. 22-23, Into the Eye of the Setting Sun, by Charlotte [Matheny] Kirkwood, pub. by Hewitt-Matheny-Cooper Family Assoc.] 

Tilman FORD (1843 -1908): s/o John and Reeda (Keizur) Ford; graduated from Willamette University at Salem in 1870; studied law and was admitted to the bar in 1874; won recognition as a reliable legal advisor and tactful trial lawyer; served two terms in the state legislature; law practice brought him a large income which he invested in farms in the area; made liberal donations to Willamette University
"Tillman was born on the trail at the Little Blue River, the son of John and Reeda [Keizur] Ford.  Tillman was later a lawyer in Salem, Oregon."  [information provided by Don Rivara. In addition to the present website his Sources included: [1] Into the Eye of the Setting Sun, by Charlotte Matheny Kirkwood, pp.  9, pub. by the Hewitt-Matheny-Cooper Family Assoc.] 

Philip FOSTER FAMILY RESEARCHER: Genealogical and Historical Resources
Francis "Frank" FOSTER
(1839-1889): m'd 1868 Mary Francis COOKE; s/o Philip and Mary (Pettygrove) Foster

George G. FOSTER (1835-1917): s/o Philip and Mary (Pettygrove) Foster

Lucy Ann FOSTER (1837-1878): m'd 1857 Josiah Adolphus BURNETT; d/o Philip and Mary (Pettygrove) Foster; died of tuberculosis on her 21st wedding anniversary at Walla Walla, WA

Philip FOSTER (1805-1884): m1. 1828 Fannie CUMMINS; m2. 1834 Mary Charlotte PETTYGROVE; s/o William and Lucy (Spencer) Foster; Philip & Mary Charlotte Foster arrived 19 May 1843 from the Sandwich Islands on the bark "Fama";  the family settled at Oregon City until 1847 when Philip purchased a claim at Eagle Creek; involved in establishing Barlow Road; operated a store at Eagle Creek that served the emigrants; established a post office there in 1867; Mary Charlotte provided the Oregon Territory with starts of lilac, apple and pear tree she brought from Maine; the farm is a national historic monument open to the public in the summer Philip Foster Farm

Philip FOSTER Jr. (1841-1860 ): s/o Philip and Mary (Pettygrove) Foster

Henry FOWLER: s/o William Fowler Sr; wintered in OR; moved to CA in 1844

William J. FOWLER  (c1818- ): m1. 1843 Rebecca Josephine KELSEY; m2. 1846 Malinda HARLAN; s/o William Fowler Sr; wintered in OR; moved to CA in 1844; wife left him several months after marriage; returned east in 1845 in William H. Winter's party to bring our rest of family in 1846 (mother, 1/2 brother, and 3 sisters)

William FOWLER Sr. (1799-1865): b. NY, moved to IL 1818 and to OR 1843; moved to CA where he settled first at Sonoma, moving later to Calistoga where he died in 1865.

Alexander FRANCIS: turned south at the Platte River to go to Taos, then a town of the Mexican province of New Mexico

FRAZIER FAMILY RESEARCHER:
Abner Russell FRAZIER
(1822-1901): m'd 1849 Eliza TURNER; s/o William/Randall and Sarah (Russell) Frazier; shown in the 1850 Marion Co but by 1860 was in CA ; note: this name is also seen as FRASER and FRAZER; note father listed in some records as William and some records as Randall; emigrated with mother and step-father, John McHaley

Lavina Elizabeth FRAZIER (1829-1912): m'd 1847 Harrison WRIGHT; d/o William/Randall and Sarah (Russell) Frazier; came to Oregon in 1843 with mother and stepfather, John McHaley; settled in Marion Co; buried in Adams Cemetery, Molalla, Marion Co, OR; note:  note father listed in some records as William and some records as Randall

Mary Adeline "Polly" FRAZIER (1827-1862): m'd 1844 Reuben LEWIS; d/o William/Randall and Sarah (Russell) Frazier; came to Oregon in 1843 with mother and stepfather, John McHaley; settled in Marion Co; buried in Twin Oaks Cemetery, Turner, Marion Co, OR

William Beverly FRAZIER (1824-1868): md 1847 Delilah COOK; s/o William/Randall and Sarah (Russell) Frazier; returned to Independence and emigrated again in 1845 with wife; enumerated in 1850 Marion Co census but by 1860 is living in CA where he dies in Contra Costa county in 1868

Mary FURLONG: (believe this is her married name, maiden name unknown at this time); family was with Applegate party, was a small girl and when badly frightened by an Indian she fell into a campfile and was badly burned; her mother wrapped her in a sheet of tar; also fell from "a canoe" while crossing a river; CA Historical Society, Recollections, typescript 24pp

John GANTT (1791-1849): ex-army officer and fur trader hired as a pilot to Fort Hall; Gantt cutoff from Fort Hall for California with the Joseph Childs company;; John Gantt by Harvey L. Carter, Mountain Men and the Fur Trade, Vol 5, Glendale, CA, 1965-72'
"John Gantt, a former army captain and fur trader, was engaged by Daniel Matheny and William Martin to serve as the scout for the 1843 Oregon emigration. The men had been authorized at the organizational meeting at Fitzhugh's Mill at Westport, Missouri.  Gantt was only engaged to guide the group as far as Fort Hall, since he was unfamiliar with the territory beyond there. He joined the California-bound group of the m
igration after his contract expired and became a California pioneer.
      Capt. John Gantt [1791-1849] was born in Park Hall, Prince George's County, Maryland to Edward Gantt [1741-1837] and Ann Stoughton Sloss [1751-1819] the youngest of 9 children. His maternal grandfather, Thomas Sloss of Somersett County, Maryland left him a portion of his personal estate in his will probated on May 16, 1797 (Keddie,Leslie & Neil, Somerset Co.,Maryland Wills{ The Family Tree Bookshop}, Liber EB#17, Folio 617). His father, Edward Gantt was a Doctor and Preist in the Episcopal Church. Edward Gantt served as Chaplin of the US Senate on 3 different ocasions before 1805. John Gantt followed his father to Louisville, Jefferson County, Kentucky. His father having been sent there by his first cousin, Bishop Thomas John Claggett on behalf of the Episcopal Church. He enlisted in the US Army with his brother Doctor Edward Sloss Gantt and his nephew, E. Stoughton Gantt. He was promoted to 2nd Lieutenant of the Rifle Regiment on May 24, 1817, 1st lieutenant of the 1st Rifle Regiment on April 5, 1818, was transfered to the infantry on June 1, 1821 and promoted to Capitain of the Sixth Regiment of Infantry on February 28, 1823. He married during this time to Virginia MCClannahan and they had a son, Nerbum B Gantt in 1829. He was dismissed from the Army after his Court Martial for falsification of pay accounts on May 12, 1829. He went into the Fur Trading business with Jefferson Blackwell and established trading posts in the Rockies and the upper Arkansas, River in what is today Pueblo, Colorado. They were the first to establish trade with the Arapahoes and Cheyannes in any volume. Gantt-Blackwell went out of business in 1834.
      After reaching California in 1843, he headed to Sutter's Fort, where Americans were welcomed, unlike other parts of California.  The ever-unstable Mexican government of California was factionalized between the followers of Juan Alvarado and those of Gov. Micheltorena. Sutter got into the dispute on the side of Micheltorena with a heavily American group he mustered at the fort.  Capt. John Gantt was put in charge of the 100-man mounted rifle unit of the small army.  Gantt
died on February 14, 1849. He is buried in Yountsville, CA. "

Samuel W. GARDNER (1821-1891): m'd c1851 Sarah A. STURGIS; 1846-1848 Samuel is shown obtaining Land claims in Clatsop Co; 1850 is enumerated in Washington Co; 1860 is in Douglas Co; 1870 and 1880 is living in WA; worked as a blacksmith, a profession that several of his sons followed;  family appears to have moved to Marion County because both Samuel and his wife Sarah are buried at Lee Mission Cemetery, Salem, Marion Co, OR in 1891; note: Samuel W. Gardner, emigrant of 1843 is sometimes confused with Samuel J. Gardner, emigrant of 1844 per Arlie Holt, an Oregon history researcher.

William GARDNER: listed on the scout list for 1843; no additional information

Rev. Enoch GARRISON. (1805- ): m'd Margaret HERREN; settled Marion Co;
"Enoch was born January 21, 1806, in Cincinnatti, Hamilton County, Ohio, the son of Abraham Garrison [1776-1837], a Methodist minister and a farmer, and Polly McCullumn Garrison [1775-1845].  He was a brother of Joseph M. Garrison, also an 1843 immigrant. Garrison was a minister and a farmer.  His wife, Margaret [Herron] Garrison, whom he married in Decatur County, Indiana, accompanied him across the plains with their children.  In 1870 Enoch and his family were living in Shasta County, California, but by 1874 he was back living in Yamhill County, Oregon.  His wife died about that time.  Enoch died June 9, 1883, at the age of seventy-seven, in McMinnville, Yamhill County, Oregon.  The children of Enoch and Margaret [Herron] Garrison were Jeptha Garrison; Joseph Garrison; Enoch Garrison II; Spencer Garrison; Mary "Polly" Garrison, who married Eldridge Edson of the 1843 migration; Susan Garrison."  [information provided by Don Rivara. In addition to the present website his Sources included: [1] Life and Labour of Rev. A. E. Garrison, 1887, Pages 82-83,  85,  121, memoirs of Abraham Garrison, brother to Enoch and Joseph M. Garrison,  who were in the 1843 migration.  Abraham didn't come west until 1846 along the Applegate Trail; [2]  U.S. Census 1870, Shasta County, CA] 

Enoch GARRISON (1842- ): m'd 1882 Mrs. Julia Ann MINOR; s/o Enoch and Margaret (Herren) Garrison; settled in Marion Co

Joseph H. GARRISON (1830-1867): m'd 1853 Rachel J. KIMSEY; s/o Enoch and Margaret (Herren) Garrison; settled in Yamhill Co

Joseph McCullumn GARRISON (1813-1884): m'd 1846 Mary MATHENY (emigrant of 1842);
"Joseph was the youngest child of Abraham Garrison [1776-1837], A Methodist minister and farmer, and Polly [McCullumn] Garrison [1775-1845].  Born in Decatur County, Indiana, on February 11, 1813, he was a brother to Enoch Garrison, also of the 1843 migration, and Abraham Garrison, who came in 1846.  All three brothers were Methodist preachers and farmers, like their father. Joseph's first wife, Parmeta [Meredith] Garrison, whom he married in Decatur County, Indiana, accompanied him on the journey west. His second wife, Mary [Matheny] Garrison, was also in the wagon train, a girl of eleven at the time. Parmeta died about 1845, and Joseph married Mary Matheny when he was thirty-three and she, thirteen in 1846. The territorial census taken in 1845 shows that J.M. Garrison household consisted of 1 male over 21 and 2 females of all ages.  It appears that Parmeta had died prior to the census-taking
      On September 1, 1844. George Wilcox, Alanson Beers, and  Medorum Crawford accompanied Garrison to Oregon City to register his land claim. Joseph's claim lay on part of the old Jason Lee Mission in Mission Bottom, Marion County, Oregon, twelve miles north of Salem.  Across the Willamette River in Yamhill County was the land claim of Daniel and Mary [Cooper] Matheny, the parents of his second wife, where the Mathenys established the town of Wheatland and the Wheatland ferry.  A wharf that Joseph constructed on the Willamette by his land was called "Garrison's Landing." Both of his brothers settled in Yamhill County.
        From 1845 Joseph taught at the Oregon Institute and was closely associated with the Methodist clergy there.  He served as the representative of Champoeg [Marion] County in the Provisional Government and was quite active.  The Garrison farm flourished and he built a large two story house.  There were mature fruit trees that the missionaries had planted, and Joseph acquired considerable livestock.  In 1847-48 Joseph served as a captain in the Cayuse War to avenge the Whitman Massacre.  His Matheny brothers-in-law served under him.
        When the California gold excitement claim, Joe was unable to leave with the men of his family.  Joe Garrison's brother Abraham tells us why Joe was not among the vanguard to arrive in the gold fields of California:  It was in the midst of harvest but what was a harvest field to a gold mine.  I had my harvest stacked and partly threshed at this time, my brother Joseph lay dangerously ill, I was taking care of him and could not leave, I had gone in partners with my old friend Lancefield Edson and [nephew] Jeptha Garrison, we took a wagon and three yoke oxen and three horses, the Co. went on, when my brother got better I followed after and overtook them at the Umpqua, when we got to the Canon [canyon] there was perhaps a Thousand persons in the train and a great many wagons, we were organized by electing Peter H. Burnett Capt....
      Advertisements in the Salem newspaper show that the Garrisons were trying to sell their land claim in 1861, but were not successful.  That December was the great flood that wiped out Wheatland and Champoeg.  The Garrison farm, on the bottom land, was flooded.  The flood came quickly, and the family retreated to the second floor of their home.  Neighbors made their way to the Garrison home to seek refuge in the second story.  They were rescued by friends with boats.  The old Garrison home was still standing until 1993, when termite infestation required it to be razed.
        After finally selling their destroyed farm, the Garrisons moved quite frequently.  At first they lived on another farm in Marion County. Then they were living in Clatsop County in 1875, from where Joseph sent news to the Salem Statesman about a shipwreck, and on Hood River, in Wasco County, by 1877.  By 1880 the Garrison had moved to The Dalles, where Joseph served as superitendent of schools.  In 1882 he suffered a paralytic stroke and died in January of 1884 at the age of seventy.  Mary survived him by twenty-four years, dying in the Sellwood district of Portland in 1908.  He is buried in The Dalles, she at Hopewell in Yamhill County.  The Garrisons' six children were Daniel David Garrison [1847-1909], an epileptic who never married; Mary Garrison [Hall] [1848-1904]; Isaiah Joseph M. Garrison [1849-1937]; Jasper Enoch Garrison [1852-1913]; Ada May Garrison [Evans] [1857-1929]; and  Emily Olive "Emma" Garrison [Barrett][Frizzell][1859-1931]." [information provided by Don Rivara. In addition to the present website his Sources included: [1] The History of the Hewitt-Matheny-Cooper Family, by Don Rivara, based on the research of Julie Jones, Gary Burlingame, and Don Rivara, 1996, self-published; [2] Life and Labour of Rev. A. E. Garrison, 1887, Pages 57-58, 122,   memoirs of Abraham Garrison, brother to Enoch and Joseph M. Garrison, who were in the 1843 migration.  Abraham didn't come west until 1846 along the Applegate Trail.]

Mary "Polly" GARRISON (1832-1882): m'd 1848 Elbridge Gerry EDSON; d/o Enoch and Margaret (Herren) Garrison; settled in Yamhill Co

Susan GARRISON (1833-1869): m'd 1851 Joseph PARROTT; d/o Enoch and Margaret (Herren) Garrison

William J. GARRISON (1827-1895): m'd 1849 Camelia SMITH; s/o Enoch and Margaret (Herren) Garrison; settled in the Amity/McMinnville area of Yamhill Co

GILMORE FAMILY RESEARCHER:
James B. GILMORE
(1838- ): s/o Samuel and Martha Gilmore; James is found up through the 1860 census living with his parents in Yamhill County

Margaret Rebecca GILMORE (1840-1912): m'd 1861 Tunis SWICK; d/o Samuel and Martha Gilmore; 1870 Margaret is in Marion County but by 1880 her and her husband and children had moved to Grant county where they remained through the 1900 census.  Tunis Swick died in Wasco Co in 1907 and Margaret died at Hood River in 1912.  Margaret was the mother of 4 children

Martha A. GILMORE: m'd 1837 Samuel Mathison GILMORE;
" Martha and her husband, S. M. Gilmore, crossed the plains in 1843; she turned twenty-five along the trail.  She was born September 11, 1818 and died February 27, 1909, at the age of ninety.  They spent their last years in Sherman County, Oregon.  She and her husband were married more than fifty years at the time of his death in 1893. Both are buried at the Wasco Methodist Cemetery in Wasco with an iron fence around their graves." [information provided by Don Rivara. In addition to the present website his Sources included: [1] Oregon's Fading Past, p.123,by Lawrence E. Nielsen and Donald S. Galbreath, Maverick Publications, Bend, OR, 1993]

Matthew C. GILMORE: listed on scout list for 1843; no additional information

Samuel Mathison GILMORE (1815-1893): m'd 1837 Martha Ann [maiden name unknown]; s/o James and Mary (Poteete)Gilmore; member of first elected law-making body of OR in 1844; 1878 was a delegate to first Washington Territorial Constitutional Convention; was a firm believer in the rights of the Indians and did much to secure important fishing privileges for them at The Dalles; died in Sherman Co, WA; letter in OHSQ 1903 #4 p.280-84;
"In his diary entry for Friday, June 30, James Nesmith states, "Sergeant Gilmore on guard."  Oregon's Fading Past states that S. M. Gilmore and his wife Martha eventually settled in Sherman County, Oregon.  Mr. Gilmore was born March 17, 1815 and died November 5, 1893, making him twenty-eight years old while he was on the trail and seventy-eight when he died. His wife was Martha A. Gilmore. She would have turned twenty-five on the trail. The couple was married for more than fifty years at the time of the death of S. M.  One of their children was Brittana C. Gilmore, who married John Fulton [1852-1930], a judge in Sherman County.  He and his wife are buried at Wasco Methodist Cemetery in Wasco." [information provided by Don Rivara. In addition to the present website his Sources included: [1] Our Proud Past, by Gail I. McCormick, self-published,  p.13, [James Nesmith's Diary of 1843, extracted from the Oregon Quarterly, December 1906]; [2] Oregon's Fading Past, p.123,by Lawrence E. Nielsen and Donald S. Galbreath, Maverick Publications, Bend, OR, 1993]

*4) Major William GILPIN (1813-1894): William Gilpin was born October 4, 1813 near Wilmington, Delaware to a wealthy Quaker family.  He was educated by private tutors and studied abroad in England before attending the University of Pennsylvania.  After graduating he attend West Point for a time but dropped out after 8 months.  He obtained a commission as second lietenant in the US Army and served in the Seminole Wars.  While in Missouri, serving as a recruiter,  he became interested in the idea of westward expansion.  In 1838, after leaving the army, he moved to St. Louis, MO where he worked as a newspaper editor and opened a law practice.  After 3 years in St. Louis he moved across the state to Independence.  In 1843 he joined John C. Fremont in his expedition to find a route over the continental divide.  When the Fremont party reached Walla Walla in the Oregon Country, Gilpin continued on to the Willamette Valley where he settled among the growing community of settlers.  Active in the organization of a provisional government he was charged with carrying a petition back east requesting support for the new provisional government.  He delivered the petition to congress in 1845 and then wrote his memoirs of his travels in the Pacific Northwest to emphasize its potential for trade and settlement.  Gilpin went on to serve in the Mexican-American War and after resuming his law practice for a period of time he was appointed governor of Colorado in 1861 by President Lincoln.  Faced with numerous difficulties during his time in office he was removed from the office in April 1862 by the same President Lincoln who had originally appointed him.  William Gilpin died January 20, 1894 at Denver, Colorado after an accident in which he was run over by a horse and buggy.

*4) Alexander GODEY:  at Ft. Hall " it became necessary to provide this party with a good hunter; and I accordingly engaged in  that capacity Alexander Godey, a young man about twenty-five years of age, who had been in this country six or seven years, all of which time he had been actively employed in hunting for the support of the posts, or in solitary trading expeditions among the Indians.  In courage and professional skill he was a formidable rival to Carson, and constantly afterwards was  among the best and most efficient of the party, and in difficult situations was of incalculable value......Godey was a Creole Frenchman of St. Louis of medium height with black eyes and silky curling black hair which was his pride."

Richard GOODMAN (c1803-1849): m'd 1831 Sally [maiden name unknown]; Richard was born in VA; married Sally in 1831 in Cooper Co, MO; in 1840 Richard and family are enumerated in the Missouri census living between the Applegate brothers; after arriving in OR he settled on claim in Marion County; gold fever took him to CA in the 1849 gold rush where he died after reportedly becaming insane; he reportedly disappeared from gold mines on Feather River, CA and soon after was reported dead; left a wife and 8 children

Sally GOODMAN: m'd Richard GOODMAN; settled in Marion Co

*3) Richard Hill GRAHAM : "Report of Journey to the Rocky Mountain"; he accompanied Sublette-Stewart hunting expedition; Missouri Historical Society Bulletin 11, 1945 pp 41-53,

Chesley B. GRAY: also seen as Chiley B. Gray; listed in the Transactions of Oregon Pioneers, Vol 3, p.49 as Chiley B. Gray, emigrant of 1843

Mary GURLEY (1793-1853): m'd 1813 Thomas Dove KEIZUR; Mary Gurley (also spelled Girley, Guirley) m'd Thomas Dove Keizur in Montgomery Co, NC; in 1828 she moved with her husband and children to Gilestown County, TN where they remained until 1833 when they moved to Arkansas.  They remained in Arkansas until their emigration to Oregon.  When they started for Oregon they were accompanied by their 10 children (5 girls and 5 boys).  The family settled in Marion county where Keizer, Oregon bears their name.

Barnett HAGGARD (1814-1859): m1. 1844 Eliza [maiden name unknown]; m2. 1853 Sarah WILSON; settled in Polk Co; wife died on claim in 1851;  Barnett died October 1859 after he fell from his wagon while intoxicated and broke his neck.  He was returning from trading goods at the store and was found on the road between the store and his home.
"Barnett was born in 1814 in Clark County, Kentucky, according to Donation Land Claim records, the son of Nathaniel Sheepskin Haggard and Elizabeth Watts Bruce, so he was twenty-nine years old when he crossed the plains in 1843. In February 28, 1844, he married Eliza Unknown.  She died September 17, 1851.  From this marriage he had at least one child, Nathaniel.  He then was married to Sarah A. Wilson on May 26, 1853, by Rev. H. M. Waller. Barnett apparently died in 1859 because the administration of his will began on October 14 of that year.  He was survived by three children:  Nathaniel, born prior to 1852; Martha Jane, born about 1854; and James M. Haggard, born about 1856."
[information provided by Don Rivara. In addition to the present website his Sources included: [1] Our Proud Past, by Gail I. McCormick, self-published, p. 19, 20, 21,  22, [James Nesmith's Diary of 1843, extracted from the Oregon Quarterly, December 1906]; [2] pp.344-345, Polk County Pioneers-Study of the Inhabitants Listed in the 1850 Federal Census of Polk County, Oregon, by Shirley H. O'Neil, 2002, self-published.]

Samuel B. HALL: settled in Clatsop Co; July 1847 signed a petition to ban alcohol in Clatsop Co; cannot find mention of him in 1850 census; may have gone to CA

Bartholomew HALLEY (1802-1883): m1. 1829 Ann BURRIS; m2. 1841 Agatha ADAMS; s/o John and Anna (Gaddy) Halley; cut off for CA; to OR by 1845; 1850 enumerated in Clackamas Co; 1860 living in Marion Co where he remained until his death

George B. HALLEY (1843 - ): s/o Bartholomew and Agatha (Adams) Halley; 1860 residing in Salem, OR; living at Astoria in 1883 per his father's probate; by 1900 was enumerated as George Hawley in Harrison, ID; did not find any record of marriage

Henry HALLEY (1836 - ): s/o Bartholomew and Ann (Burris) Halley; is enumerated in the 1880 Deer Lodge, MT census as Henry Hawley, placer miner, unmarried; in the 1883 probate of his father Henry's location was listed as unknown

John E. HALLEY (1831 - ):  s/o Bartholomew and Ann (Burris) Halley; is not listed as an heir in his father's probate in 1883 so it is assumed he is deceased by this time

Mary Francis HALLEY (1832-1893): m'd 1845 John Francis WARNOCK; d/o Bartholomew and Ann (Burris) Halley; b. 20 Feb 1831 in Pine Ridge, Botetourt Co, VA; emigrated with parents; settled in Marion Co; mother of 10 children; died 20 Jun 1893 at Silverton, OR; buried in Miller Cemetery, Silverton, Marion Co, OR

William HARGROVE: wintered in OR; 1844 moved to CA

B. HARGIS: seen also as Harrigas, B.

David Colcord HATCH (1842- ): m'd 1869 J. MILLER; s/o Peter and Charlotte (Colcord) Hatch; arrived with parents from Honolulu on bark Fama; was married at sea, off Point Greenville, on the steamship "George S. Wright"

Peter H. HATCH (1810-1898): m1. 1841 Charlotte Sophia COLCORD; m2. 1847 Sarah C. LOCEY; s/o Ezra and  Susannah (Holt) Hatch; 1831 was a blacksmith on a whaling ship; 1841 left ship at Honolulu; went to work at mission school teaching carpentry, stone masonry and blacksmithing work; first wife was one of teachers at the mission; 1843 came to Oregon via the bark Fama; went to work for Dr. John McLoughlin carrying goods between Vancouver and Oregon City in a bateau; preached prohibition in early Oregon City which caused a stir amongst the saloon owners; settled in Marion county; was a house mover in Salem; held several positions including justice of the peace; arraigned Beale and Baker for murder of Daniel Delany; acquisitions by OHS include crowbar used by Peter H. Hatch c1844 in building a road along the bluff between Oregon City and Canemah. It was used by Mr. Hatch up to his death in 1898; buried Salem Pioneer Cemetery, Salem, Marion Co, OR

HAUN/HAWN FAMILY RESEARCHER:
Alonzo Pearson HAWN
(1837- ): s/o Jacob and Harriet (Pearson) Hawn; appears in the 1850 Yamhill Co census but by 1870 is residing in Wasco County with his widowed mother

Jacob HAWN (1804-1860): m'd 1833 Harriet Elizabeth PIERSON; s/o Henry Hawn; Jacob was a millwright and plied his trade at the Whitman Mission while members of the train rested; upon reaching Oregon City he was hired by Dr. John McLoughlin to to build a grist mill at the falls; by 1850 he had removed to Yamhill county where he settled in the Lafayette area;  he died there by January 1860

Jacob HAWN (1835- ) s/o Jacob and Harriet (Pearson) Hawn; twin of Laura Ann Hawn; does not appear in the 1850 census; appears to have been deceased by then

Jasper Columbus HAWN (1840-1917 ): s/o Jacob and Harriet (Pearson) Hawn

Laura Aurvilla HAWN (1835-1921): m1. 1850 Joel PERKINS; m2. 1859, John William ATWOOD (div); m3. David PATTERSON; d/o Jacob and Harriet (Pearson) Hawn; twin of Jacob Hawn Jr.; died at the Dalles in 1921
*1: MSS #381, 14pp reminiscence handscript copy. Name shown as Laura Ann Hawn Patterson in description of manuscript

Newton Weston HAWN (1843-1921 ): s/o Jacob and Harriet (Pearson) Hawn; died in Clackamas Co, OR

James HAYS: Yamhill Co census records show a there is a James E. Hays (c1814-before 1870); not known if this is the 1843 emigrant, James Hays

HEMBREE FAMILY RESEARCHER:
Capt. Absolom Jefferson HEMBREE
(1813-1856): m'd 1834 Nancy DODSON; Absolom was a stockman; s/o James and Nancy (Pettit) Hembree; wintered in Oregon City and in the spring of 1844 took up a donation land claim in Yamhill Co near Lafayette where he ran a store for several years; was a representative to the legislature from Yamhill Co; was on numerous committees; served as Capt. in Yakima Indian War, was ambushed, killed and scalped by Indians in Apr 1856; was buried in the Hembree Cemetery on his farm with full Masonic honors accompanied by a brass band and a company of citizen soldiers.  There were reportedly 700-1000 in attendance.
"Absalom and his brother Joel J. Hembree brought their families across the Oregon Trail in 1843.   Absalom was nine years younger than his brother Joel.  He was born December 14, 1813, and therefore was twenty-nine years old when he crossed the plains.  Absalom was born in Warren County, TN, on December 14, 1813, after his family had moved there from South Carolina, where Joel was born.  He was twenty-one when he married Nancy Dodson there.  Traveling with the young couple across the plains were their children: Nancy Matilda, 6; Ann E. Hembree, 3; and their son William Jasper, an infant born in late 1842 or early 1843.  The baby died crossing the plains.  In the spring of 1844 Absalom and Nancy took up a Donation Land Claim in Yamhill County, near where the town of Carlton is now, where they engaged in raising stock. Absalom also ran a store for several years in Lafayette.  He ran against Joe Meek for marshall but lost. In Oregon the Hembrees had other children:  James Lawson Hembree, 1845; Joel Jordon Hembree, 1849; Absalom Jefferson Hembree II, 1853; and Lillian May Hembree, 1854.  During the Indian Wars of 1855-1856, Absalom enlisted and was captain of a company. At Status Creek, in Yakima County, Washington, on April 10, 1856, he rode to the top of a butte with several of his men to see if any Indians were in the country.  Rising from behind rocks the Indians fired.  Absalom was shot through the body but joined his men in retreating down the hill toward the camp riding a mule.  In going down the steep hill, the mule fell and Absalom was thrown.  Before he could get up, the Indians were upon him.  He killed three of them, but was shot under the eye and killed.  They scalped him and rode away. He was forty-two years old. His body was taken to Dayton, Yamhill County, Oregon, where the Masons conducted the funeral. It was one of the largest Masonic funerals ever conducted in Oregon up to that time. Nancy survived him by thirty years, dying in 1886 in Lafayette, Oregon." [information provided by Don Rivara. In addition to the present website his Sources included: [1] Conversations With Pioneer Men, by Fred Lockley of the Oregon Journal, compiled by Mike Helm, 1996, Rainy Day Press, pp.45, 48, [Absalom's son Joel recounted the story of his father's death to Lockley.]  See:
Absolom Hembree Biography by Windsor, CA Historical Society

Albert T. HEMBREE (1833-1915): m'd 1854 Mary Aladine PELL; s/o Joel and Sarah (Paine) Hembree;
"Albert was ten years old when he crossed the plains with his parents, Joel J. Hembree and Sarah [Paine] Hembree.  He was born April 20, 1833, in Warren County, Tennessee.  After settling with his parents in Yamhill County, Oregon, Albert married Mary Aladine Pell on December 1854, when he was twenty-one and she, fifteen.  She had been born in Cincinatti, OH, on April 8, 1839. After leaving Yamhill County, the Hembrees moved to Lane County, Oregon, where they lived for at least twenty years.They were married sixty years when Mary died on February 19, 1915, in Redondo Beach, Los Angeles County, California.  Albert died later that year on November 28, in Dixon, Solano County, California. He was eighty-two.  Most of their descendants were in California at the time of their deaths."  [information provided by Don Rivara.]

Andrew Thomas HEMBREE (1803-1873): s/o Joel and Mary (Pettit) Hembree; m'd [ ], Martha Lorinda; uncle of Absolom J. Hembree; in 1860 was sued by "Miss Pendleton" (Mary Jane Pennington, daughter of  John and Sarah (Hembree) Pennington who were also emigrants of 1843), age 16,  for seduction; was convicted by a jury; ordered to pay $7080 for her and her illigitimate child; while quite wealthy when the suit was started he gave away or sold all his property; it was thought that some of the sales could be overturned in order to make restitution to Miss Pendleton; she had been made a charge of Andrew Hembree when her mother died; Andrew died in Sonoma Co, CA Nov 5, 1873

Ann Eliza HEMBREE (1840-1932): m'd 1859 John Winchell CULLEN; d/o Absalom and Nancy (Dodson) Hembree; after her marriage to John Cullen she lived in Portland and in Union County, OR; she died in Portland in 1922
"Ann was three years old when she crossed the plains with her parents.  She had been born  in 1840 in Polk County, Missouri.  She was sixteen when her father was killed in the Yakima Indian War in 1856.  Three years later she married John Winchell Cullen on July 14, 1859, in Yamhill County, Oregon." [information provided by Don Rivara.]

Houston HEMBREE (1837- ): m'd Amanda BOWMAN; s/o Joel and Sarah (Paine) Hembree; was separated from his wife in the mid 1860s; his son was raised by his wife's family.
"Houston was born on June 7, 1839, in Carthage, Jasper County, Missouri.  He was not yet four when the great journey across the plains began.  Worked making shingles; Houston died in California." [information provided by Don Rivara.]

Isham John HEMBREE (1835-1852): s/o Joel and Sarah (Paine) Hembree
"Isham was eight years old when he crossed the plains with his parents.  He  had been born on April 4, 1835, in Warren County, Tennessee.  Isham was was twenty-seven when he died in Lafayette, Yamhill County, Oregon, December 30, 1852."[information provided by Don Rivara.]

James Thomas HEMBREE (1826-1919): m'd 1845 Melvina MILLICAN; s/o Joel and Sarah (Paine) Hembree) settled Yamhill Co
"James, at seventeen, was the eldest of the children of Joel Jordan Hembree and his wife Sarah [Paine] Hembree on the trail.  He was born September 13, 1826, in Warren County, Tennessee, near McMinnville.  His future bride, Melvina Ann Millican, was also on the wagon train.  They were married two years after arriving in Oregon.  The Hembrees settled in Yamhill County and James married Melvina on September 29, 1845, when he was nineteen and she had just turned thirteen.  They were married seventy years at the time of Melvina's death on March 17, 1916, in Lafayette, OR.  After Melvina's death, James moved to Portland with his daughter Nancy Jane.  He died three years later, in 1919, in Portland.  He was ninety-two years old.  He and Melvina were married longer than anyone else among the pioneers of 1843." [information provided by Don Rivara.]

Joel Jasper HEMBREE (1837-1843): s/o Joel and Sarah (Paine) Hembree; killed when ran over by a wagon at Liberty Rock, Idaho; the story of the discovery of Joel's grave marker on La Prele Creek, west of Douglas, Wyoming and his recent reburial are told by Reg Duffin "The Grave of Joel Hembree", Overland Journal 3, #2 (1985) p.6-16;
"Joel was the child of Joel J. Hembree and Sarah [Paine] Hembree of the 1843 migration. He was born March 2, 1837 in McMinnville, Tennessee. Joel was the first to die along the Oregon Trail on July 17, 1843.  Jim Nesmith wrote in his diary on July 20, 1843, "…at noon came up to a fresh grave with stones piled over it, and a note tied on a stick, informing us that it was the grave of Joel Hembree, child of Joel J. Hembree, aged six years, and was killed by a wagon running over its body.  At the head of the grave stood a stone containing the name of the child, the first death that has occurred on the expedition.  The grave is on the left hand side of the trail, close to Squaw Butte Creek…" The grave can still be seen along the trail." [information provided by Don Rivara; his sources include [1] Our Proud Past, by Gail I. McCormick, self-published, p. 15 [James Nesmith's Diary of 1843, extracted from the Oregon Historical Quarterly, December 1906]; [2] Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, on-line Family Search]

Joel Jordan HEMBREE (1804-1868): m'd 1825 Sarah PAINE; settled Yamhill Co; s/o James and Nancy (Pettit) Hembree
"Joel and his brother Absalom Jefferson Hembree brought their families across the trail to Oregon in 1843.  Joel was born December 7, 1804, in Spartanburg, South Carolina.  The family later moved to Warren County, Tennessee, near the town of McMinnville. There, on October 20, 1825, he married Sarah Paine.  Accompanying the Hembrees on the trail were their children:  James N. Thomas Hembree, 17; Waymon Clark Hembree, 14; Albert T. Hembree, 10; Isham John Hembree, 8; Joel Hembree, 6; Houston Hembree, 4; Nancy Jane Hembree, born July 26, 1843, on the Oregon Trail.  Young Joel was killed on the trail on July 17, when he was run over by a wagon. It was the second child the Hembrees had lost that year.  In February, before leaving their home in Carthage, Jasper County, Missouri, the Hembrees had lost their two year old daughter Sarah Hembree. Nine days after Joel was killed, Sarah gave birth to a daughter on the trail. The family settled in Yamhill County, Oregon. The Hembrees had other children in Oregon:  George A. Hembree, April 2, 1846-July 10, 1861; and Martha Ann Hembree, May 14, 1848.  Joel died there September 8, 1868, at the age of sixty-three." [information provided by Don Rivara; his sources include: [1] Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, on-line Family Search] 

Lafayette HEMBREE (1830- ): m'd 1859 Eliza RUBLE; s/o Joel and Sarah (Paine) Hembree

Mary Jane HEMBREE (1839-1857): m'd 1854 John SANDERSON; s/o Absolom and Nancy (Dodson) Hembree; a James Sanderson and his three year old daughter Anna are shown living in the Absolom Hembree household in 1860

Nancy Jane HEMBREE (1843- ): born on the trail at Liberty Rock, Idaho; d/o Joel and Sarah (Paine) Hembree
"Nancy Jane was born July 26, 1843, on the Oregon Trail, just nine days after her brother Joel had died in a trail accident.  She died in Multnomah County, Oregon." [information provided by Don Rivara]

Nancy Matilda HEMBREE (1837-1922): m1. S. J. BOGART; m2. 1853 Harman Hartman SNOW; d/o Absolom and Nancy (Dodson) Hembree; died in Tacoma, WA April 27, 1922; "Reminiscences of A Journey Across the Plains in 1843 with Dr. Marcus Whitman's Caravan", original mss, 9pp UCLB

Sarah Elizabeth HEMBREE (1816-1851): m'd 1841 John Barton PENNINGTON; d/o James and Nancy (Pettit) Hembree; died on claim in Yamhill Co in Sept 1851

Wayman Clark HEMBREE (1829-1920): m1. 1861 Nancy Ann GARRISON; m2. 1891 Nancy Jane (BEAGLE) Crisp; s/o Joel and Sarah (Paine) Hembree; settled Yamhill Col OHS Vol VII p.441, acquisitions include diary of W.C. Hembree, from Oct 16, 1855 to Apr 1858 gives details of the winter campaign of the First Regiment Oregon Mounted Volunteers from Lafayette, OR during the Yakima Indian War;
"Waymon was fourteen years old when  he crossed the plains with his parents, Joel J. Hembree and Sarah [Paine] Hembree.  He was born March 7, 1829, in McMinnville, Warren County, Tennessee.  After arriving in Oregon, the family settled in Lafayette, Yamhill County, Oregon.  He married Nancy Ann Garrison in June of 1861.  Nancy Ann had been born in Des Moines, Iowa, on July 29, 1843.  He was twenty-two  and she, almost eighteen.They had nine children before she died on September 7, 1891, at the age of forty-eight. In 1891, Waymon took as his second wife a fellow traveler of 1843, Nancy [Beagle] Crisp, now a widow.  There were no children from the second marriage, for Nancy was beyond her child-bearing years.  Waymon again was widowed in 1914. He died March 22, 1920 at the age of ninety-one." [Information provided by Don Rivara]

Jane HENDERSON (1802-1875): m'd 1822 Lewis LINEBARGER; d/o Joseph and Jane (McGee) Henderson; Jane was born in Montgomery County, VA; Feb 7, 1822 she was married to Lewis Linebarger in Jackson Co, IN; they moved to Macoupin, IL c1832 where they remained about eight years.  in 1840 they moved to MO where they remained until emigrating west in 1843; after arrival the family settled in Linn Co; Jane was committed to Oregon Insane Asylum in 1866; died in 1875 and is buried in Sand Ridge Cemetery, Linn Co; mother of 11 children (Harriet, Elizabeth Ann, John Henderson, Andrew Jackson, William, Mary Grace, Lewis "Luke", Joseph, Delilah, and twins, Frances Marion, and Virginia who were born in OR)

Abijah S. HENDRICKS (1815-1873): m'd 1846 Mary Jane DICKERSON; settled in Yamhill county where he married his wife in 1846; remained in the Lafayette-Carlton area until his death July 29, 1873; was a member of the first legislature to meet in the Oregon territory; he was the father of 7 children, all born in Yamhill county; his wife continued to live in Yamhill county

Thomas J. HENSLEY: turned off at Fort Hall for California

HESS FAMILY RESEARCHER:
Joseph W. HESS
(1815-1879): m'd 1836 Mary Louise KEIZUR; s/o Solomon and Nancy (Tate) Hess; settled near Newberg, Yamhill Co; father of 13 children; c1844 he bought 500 head of Spanish cattle from a man who had brought them up to OR;  indicted  for selling liquor to the Indians and for allowing gambling in his residence;1849 during the mining fever a bunch of miners were stranded in southern Oregon so Hess took a pack train and carried them provisions; arm was amputated in 1878; Joseph died Dec 1879 in Eagle Point, Jackson Co, OR where he had gone to establish a claim with a friend.  While working in the winter snow his partner's ax slipped, striking Joseph in the head and killing him.

Mary Jane HESS (1839 - ): m'd 1858 Albert CARTWRIGHT; d/o Joseph and Mary (Keizur) Hess

Sarah Evaline HESS (1840-1936): m'd 1862 Henry M. JONES; d/o Joseph and Mary (Keizur) Hess; settled in Marion Co; buried City View Cemetery, Marion Co

Tillman Cullwell HESS (1837-1928 ): m'd 1858 Rachel Marinda HALL; s/o Joseph and Mary (Keizur) Hess; stockraiser and miner; died and is buried in Alturas, Modoc Co, CA; was shot in chest by a man named Morris who claimed it was self defense

Virginia Rowley HESS (1841-1907): m'd 1862 John Riley MILLER; d/o Joseph and Mary (Keizur) Hess; buried at Newberg, Yamhill Co, OR

William H. HESS (1843- ): s/o Joseph and Mary (Keizur) Hess

HEWITT FAMILY RESEARCHERS:
Ann Eliza HEWITT
(1842- ): d/o Henry and Elizabeth (Matheny) Hewitt;
"Ann Eliza was born in 1841 in Platte County, Missouri, the daughter of Henry Hewitt and Elizabeth [Matheny] Hewitt. She was two years old at the time of the crossing of the plains and her parents only child.  In Oregon the family settled in Yamhill County, Oregon, at the present site of Unionvale.  Here Ann Eliza was joined by nine more siblings--all brothers.  She married John Thornton.  She died from consumption in 1883 at the age of forty-two.  She was the only child of her parents to die before their deaths in 1899, the only daughter, and the only child to have crossed the plains.  Her husband died also from consumption in 1887.  The children were reared by Ann Eliza's parents." [Information provided by Don Rivara]   

Henry HEWITT (1822-1899): m'd 1841 Elizabeth MATHENY;  "Henry Hewitt was born in 1822 in Huntingdon County, Pennsylvania, the son of Henry and [Cresswell] Hewitt.  The family moved to Platte County, Missouri, about 1840.  On February 25, 1841, at the age of eighteen, Henry married Elizabeth Matheny, daughter of Daniel Matheny and Mary [Cooper] Matheny of the '43 migration."[Information provided by Don Rivara]   

William L. HIGGINS (1822- ):  there were several William Higgins listed in the 1850 CA census but no matches were found.  It is possible he died or returned east; one source lists a William Higgins as pioneer of 1844

Almoran HILL (1822-1910): m'd 1841 Sarah Jane REED; s/o Wright and Frances (Christian) Hill; settled in Washington Co; to CA 1849 for short time; was a bull-whacker for Jesse Applegate; OHS MSS#1508, 6pp reminiscence, typescript, "Description of Uncle and Aunt Hill's journey to Oregon in 1843"; had brothers named Henry and William and am wondering of the Henry C. and William listed below may be those brothers. Almoran was father of (Wilson Bowlby, Diantha, Frances Marion, Amanda M., Mary Ann, Margaret, Kryphena, Hannah, Neta Caroline, Sarah Jane, Ulysses Grant, William S., Almoran, and Narcissa )

Diantha HILL (1843 -c1878): m'd c1859 Thomas JENKINS; d/o Almoran and Sarah (Reed) Hill; born on trail 27 Sep 1843 near Grand Ronde; was married and living in Washington by 1860 Census with husband and infant daughter; 1870 living in Wasco Co with small son and no mention of daughter; by 1880 Skamania Co, Wash census Thomas is widowed with three children

Henry C. HILL (1824-): m1. 1845 Mary A. [maiden name unknown]; m2. c1872 Anna [maiden name unknown]; settled in Yamhill Co originally but by 1870 was living in Multnomah county; may be brother of Almoran listed above

William HILL: listed as an emigatnt of 1843 in the Transactions of Oregon Pioneers.  Records on him not found.

Wilson Bowlby HILL (1842 -1843): died on trail; s/o Almoran and Sarah (Reed) Hill

HINSHAW FAMILY RESEARCHERS:
Isaac HINSHAW
: there are conflicting reports regarding Isaac; one states that after the death of his first wife he signed on in 1843 to herd cattle for one of the large herds going to OR. It is stated that he then returned east and emigrated with other family members in 1845; other sources state that Isaac did not come to OR until 1845; see 1845 listing for additional information on family

Britana HINTON (1811-1883): m'd 1835 John RICHARDSON; followed her husband to CA where he ran a stage station and to southern Oregon while he mined; died at Vale, Oregon while staying with her son and is buried in Vale Cemetery; her husband moved to Arizona in 1885 and died there in 1886

Ann HOBSON (1831 - ): m'd 1850 Clement A. Bradbury; d/o William Hobson; emigrated from England in 1843, arriving in New Orleans March 1843; in spring of same year emigrated with family to Oregon, settling in Clatsop Co; moved with husband to Columbia County where she died after having two children

Emma HOBSON (1837-1911): m'd 1850 Ninian Alvanah EBERMAN; d/o William and Margaret (Hutchinson) Hobson; emigrated from England in 1843, arriving in New Orleans March 1843; in spring of same year emigrated with family to Oregon, settling in Clatsop Co; mother of 14 children; buried Pioneer Cemetery, Clatsop Co, OR

John HOBSON (1825-1896): m'd 1851 Diana Mary OWENS; settled in Clatsop Co; s/o William and Margaret (Hutchinson) Hobson; emigrated from England in 1843, arriving in New Orleans March 1843; in spring of same year emigrated with family to Oregon, settling in Clatsop Co; buried Pioneer Cemetery, Clatsop Co, OR

Mary HOBSON (1827-c1848): m'd c1845 William DOAK; d/o William and Margaret (Hutchinson) Hobson; emigrated from England in 1843, arriving in New Orleans March 1843; in spring of same year emigrated with family to Oregon, settling in Clatsop Co; daughter, Elizabeth Mary that was born Mar 1846 is shown in the 1850 census living with her grandfather, no mention of her parents are found so it is assumed they are deceased

Capt. Richard HOBSON (1828-1878): m'd 1853 Kate Kezziah YOUNG; s/o William and Margaret (Hutchinson) Hobson; settled in Clatsop Co; born in Derbyshire, England, Oct 23, 1829; on January 16, 1843, with his parents and the rest of his family, he sailed from Liverpool for the USA.  In the spring of the same year the family started from MO for Oregon, arriving at Fort Vancouver on November 17, 1843.  They then followed the Columbia River down to their new home onf the Clatsop plains.  In 1848 Richard went to the gold mines of CA where he remained for main part of a year before returning home.  In 1853 he married Kate K. Young, an emigrant of 1849.  In 1854 he went to Australia, taking his wife with him, to participate in the rich gold diggings found there.  He remained there for five years, returning again to Oregon in September 1859.  At that time he became a pilot and master of numerous vessels on the Columbia river, traveling from the bar at the mouth to Portland.  In 1877 with the hopes of recovering his health and strength he made a prolonged visit to friends in the Sandwich Islands.  Richard returned home but in a short time became ill again and had to return to the islands.  It soon became apparent that there was to be no lasting cure and in hopes of seeing his family again he boarded ship for home.  He died two days before reaching Astoria.  He is buried in the Clatsop cemetery, Clatsop Co, OR

William HOBSON (1797-1879): m1. HUTCHINSON, Margaret ( -1838) ; m2. 1853 Campbell Eyres (TURNER) Elizabeth; born in England, in January of 1843 sailed from Liverpool, England to USA on the ship Swanton, arriving in New Orleans on March 16, 1843; left in the spring from MO for Oregon; married the widow of Miles Eyres, Elizabeth (Turner) Eyres Campbell, and settled at Astoria, Clatsop Co, OR   William Hobson Obituary and Letters

*3) Father HOECKEN: Catholic priest; left group at the Little Sandy beyond South Pass; left for the "Flatheads"

Samuel M HOLDERNESS. (c1820- ): m'd Hannah SAVAGE; born in England; was a merchant in Clackamas County for several years. In 1845 he challenged Dr. Elijah White to a duel.  There was a bill hurried through the House that very day by Legislature Applegate prohibiting dueling in order to prevent the duel from taking place.  Samuel sold his business in 1850 and  is not found in the 1860 and 1870 census but a daughter was born in the Washington territory in 1855; 1880 he is living in Marion County and is enumerated as a magazine writer; Hannah (Savage) Holderness filed for divorce in Marion county in 1882 and shortly thereafter died of a spinal disease;  no further record is found for Samuel Holderness.

Rebecca Rawlings HOLLADAY ( -1870): m'd 1822 Fendall Carr CASON; settled with husband in Clackamas Co; her husband died in 1860 and is buried at Mountain View Cemetery in Clackamas County

B. HOLLEY: found on some lists for 1843, this is probably Bartholomew HALLEY

HOLMAN FAMILY RESEARCHER:
Daniel Saunders HOLMAN
(1822-1910): m'd 1847 Martha E. BURNETT; s/o John and Elizabeth (Duval) Holman; first wife reportedly died after reaching Oregon; settled first in Clackamas Co where he is listed as a teamster in the 1850 census; by 1860 was farming in Polk Co; 1870 had moved to Yamhill Co where he farmed in the McMinnville area until his death in 1910.

John HOLMAN (1787-1864): m1. 1810 Elizabeth DUVAL; m2. Martha THOMASSON; came to OR in 1843 with son, Daniel S. Holman; settled at McMinnville, Yamhill Co; sent for his remaining children who were in the 1845 emigration; first wife had died in 1841

Mary Ann HOLMAN (1833-1879): m'd 1849 James Lyburn CLINKENBEARD; d/o John and Elizabeth (Duval) Holman

HOLMES FAMILY RESEARCHER:
Elizabeth J. HOLMES
: d/o William and Mary (Williams) Holmes

Ermina A. HOLMES (1841- ): d/o William and Mary (Williams) Holmes

Frances E. HOLMES (1842- ): d/o William and Mary (Williams) Holmes

Minnie G. HOLMES (1836- ): m'd [ first name unknown] O'NEIL; d/o William and Mary (Williams) Holmes

Riley A. HOLMES :

Samuel Peyton  HOLMES (1839- ): s/o William and Mary (Williams) Holmes

William Livingston HOLMES (1807-1879): m'd 1834 Mary A.Louisa C. WILLIAMS; farmer; sheriff of Clackamas Co 1844-1855; s/o David Holmes; "William and his wife Louisa took up a land claim in Clackamas County near Oregon City with a view of Mt. Hood.  They built an elaborate home with a ballroom and had four rosewood pianos.  The inagural ball for Governor Joseph Lane was held here in March 1849.  Their house, called Rose Farm, still stands." [Information provided by Don Rivara; his sources include: [1]  "The Rose Farm, 1847--Oregon City," by Marshall Dana, pp. 50-51, Oregon Historical Landmarks, pub. by Oregon Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution.]

James HOUCK (1819- ): m1. c1858 Mary JONES; m2. c1859 Frances E. ALBERT; resided in OR two years; to CA and then to Mexico to take part in war between Americans and Mexico; 1857 returned to Ohio; returned to OR 1875 and settled in Yamhill Co

HOWELL FAMILY RESEARCHER:
Andrew HOWELL
(1831- ): m'd [ ], Emily; s/o John and Temperance (Midkiff) Howell; 1860 is listed in Josephine Co as a miner, by 1870 is in Del Norte Co, CA listed as a farmer; shown again in Del Norte Co, CA in 1880 as a laborer; 1900 living in Curry Co, OR

Edmund Kimble HOWELL (1833-1878): does not appear to have married; working as a farm laborer in Dayton, Yamhill Co, OR in 1870 census; s/o John and Temperance (Midkiff) Howell

Elizabeth Brooks HOWELL (1822-1900): m'd 1840 George Fristo MCCORKLE; settled at Howell Prairie in Marion county near her father where she remained until her death; was the mother of 8 children, only 4 of which survived her; Elizabeth is buried next to her husband at Howell Prairie Cemetery

George W. HOWELL (1828 -bef 1878 ): m'd 1847 Mary Elizabeth MCDANIEL; s/o John and Temperance (Midkiff) Howell; had donation land claim in Linn Co; 1850 in Polk Co and 1860 in Marion County; wife died in 1862 and a letter in his claim file indicates he was deceased by 1878

Jefferson Metcalf HOWELL (1835-1885): m1. Martha Jane FIELD; m2. Ellen Eliza MILLICK; s/o John and Temperance (Midkiff) Howell; sheriff of Josephine Co, prominent in the area; died at the Oregon Insane Asylum in 1885 and is buried at Salem Pioneer Cemetery, Salem, Marion Co, OR

John HOWELL (1787-1869): m'd 1811 Temperance MIDKIFF; s/o Benjamin and Elizabeth (Brooks) Howell; John was born in Orange Co, NC he married Temperance in Grainger Co, TN and shortly after moved to IN.  In 1837 he moved to MO where he remained until his emigration to Oregon in 1843 (family lore state that John first came in 1839 with surveying expedition but so far this claim is unconfirmed);  upon arrival he settled in Marion Co where he spent his remaining years; an obituary for John states he is the father of 11 children but family lists show 14 children (Mary 1812, Haywood Benjamin 1814, John Jamison 1816, William Brooks 1818, Pleasant Rose 1820, Elizabeth Brooks 1822, Thomas E. 1824, Wesley 1826, George W. 1828, Sarah J. 1830, Andrew 1831, Kimble Edmond 1833, Jefferson Metcalf 1835 and Nancy 1836).  Those that did not come to Oregon include; Mary (1812) died in 1843 prior to emigration (see listing below), Haywood B. (1814) enumerated in 1850 MO census, John Jamison (1816), Sarah (1830) not listed in 1840 census so it is assumed she died prior to 1840, Nancy (1836) not listed in 1840 census so it is assumed she also died prior to 1840 ; John is buried in Howell Prairie Cemetery;
" In James Nesmith's diary entry for Thursday, June 15, 1843, he states, "Tonight the council assembled to settle some difficulty between John B. Howell and Elbridge Edson.  Circumstances too numerous to mention." [Information provided by Don Rivara; his sources include [1]  Our Proud Past, by Gail I. McCormick, self-published, pp 16, [James Nesmith's Diary of 1843, extracted from the Oregon Historical Quarterly, December 1906]

Mary HOWELL (1812-c1843): m'd 1832 Samuel N. VANCE; d/o John and Temperance (Midkiff) Howell; it appears Mary died just prior to emigration but her husband and children continued west with the Howell family

Pleasant HOWELL (1820-c1878): m'd c1856 Jane [maiden name unknown]; s/o John and Temperance (Midkiff) Howell; 1850 living in Marion county where, after several trials he was convicted of several counts of larceny against Daniel Brock and sentenced to 1 year in penitientiary.  It had been testified that he, up until that point, had shown to have been of good character.  He is shown Sep 30, 1859 as an inmate at the state prison but by 1860 is enumerated with his wife and children in South Salem; by 1870 he had moved to Umatilla county where he died c1878.  His wife and children are enumerated in the 1880 Umatilla census

Sarah J. HOWELL (1830- ): d/o John and Temperance (Midkiff) Howell

Thomas E. HOWELL (1824- ): m'd 1847 Rachel MCCLANE; s/o John and Temperance (Midkiff) Howell; by 1860 was living in Molalla, Clackamas Co, OR; delegate to the Democratic convention numerous times; active in civic affairs

Wesley HOWELL (1826-1883): m'd 1848 Margaret M. MCDANIEL; s/o John and Temperance (Midkiff) Howell; settled in Howell Praire, Marion Co where he remained until his death; buried in Howell Prairie Cemetery

William Brooks HOWELL (1818-1883): m'd Sallie Ann CLAYPOOL; s/o John and Temperance (Midkiff) Howell; resided in both Marion County and Linn county until 1880 when he is found in the Phoenix, AZ census with his wife and children

A. HOYT : there was an advertisement in the Oregon Spectator in April 1851 seeking an Alph Hoyt who had a letter at the Astoria Post Office

HUCK, James (1819- ):

William P. HUGHES: was sheriff in Champoeg county (later Marion county); served as 2nd Lt in Cayuse war

Henry Harrison HUNT (1811-1852): m'd 1850 Ursula J. [maiden name unknown]; married his wife Feb 1850 while in Wayne Co, IN on business; listed in the 1850 Clatsop Co census as a lumberman; was owner of numerous mills in Clatsop County; in 1850 he and S. Coffin sponsored the building of a ship in New York City to ply between Oregon and San Francisco;  he arrived on the ship Gold Hunter in January of 1851 and then left for CA on business, leaving his new wife to reside in Clatsop Co.;  he remained in CA on business until his death 25 Dec 1852; although he was gone for the majority of his marriage it has been stated that he kept in frequent contact by mail

Alanson HUSTED (1808- ): m'd 1848 Mary (MONTGOMERY) Saunders;  Mary was the widow of Luke Saunders who was killed in the Whitman Massacre.  Mary and her children were brought to Oregon City after the massacre and that is where she met and married Alanson Husted;  Alonson was listed as a stonemason in the 1850 Clackamas Co Census, although numerous mentions of him in the newspapers of the time show that he was involved in numerous land transactions;  by 1851 he had left for CA, abandoning his wife and her children in Clackamas Co and leaving them without support; Mary filed for divorce in 1854; Alanson was not found in the 1860 census

Isaac HUTCHINS (1816- ): m'd 1837 Sarah F. A. [maiden name unknown]; rented from Webley Hauxhurst in 1844 in what is now Marion county; Isaac took in a room mate by the name of Joel Turnham who was shot and killed by deputies during an altercation with Hauxhurst; was elected 2nd Lt of Oregon Rangers in meeting Jan 1846; sheriff of Linn Co in 1850s; by 1860 Isaac is listed as a day laborer and his wife is shown as head of household and a washerwoman at Albany, Linn Co, OR

Henry Harrison HYDE (1812 -1881): m'd 1846 Henrietta HOLMAN; m2. Susan (BROCK) Kimsey; born in Volney, NY on 24 Sep 1812; settled Clackamas Co; believe that his wife may have died c1849; was living in Yamhill Co in 1850 but believe his son, listed as Thomas C. Hyde, is found living in Portland, Washington, Co in household of J. L. Clinkinbeard along with a Susan Holman and others; was marshal at Oregon City in 1846 when he was replaced by SW Moss; died 08 Jul 1881 and is buried Prairie City Cemetery, Grant Co, OR

John Henderson Brake JACKSON (1820-1869): m'd 1846 Sarah Sutton PARKER; was single when he emigrated, working as a teamster for another family; settled on the Tualatin Plains; father of 9 children; some sources list him as an emigrant of 1844; after his death in 1869 his widow remained in Washington county and did not remarry.  She died there in 1917.
"In James Nesmith's diary entry for Sunday, September 5, 1843, he states, "Jackson, Cooper's teamster, left and joined Zachary's mess."  Apparently Jackson had been hired for the trip west by Lyman Cooper to drive one of his wagons and a problem arose between him and the Coopers.  It appears that Zachary hired Jackson to drive the wagon that Mr. Matney had formerly driven, Matney having had a falling out with Zachary.  People were getting on each other's nerves badly by this part of the trail.  Jackson may have had second thoughts three days later when his new boss stabbed Mr. Wheeler in a disagreement on September 8." [Information provided by Don Rivara; his sources include [1]  Our Proud Past, by Gail I. McCormick, self-published, pp 16, 18, [James Nesmith's Diary of 1843, extracted from the Oregon Historical Quarterly, December 1906]

Calvin JAMES: there are estate records for Umatilla Co for a Calvin James with no dates listed

Sarah JENKINS (1826-1896): m1. 1842 Andrew Jackson MASTERS; m2. 1857 Rev. Henry WILLOUGHBY; m3. 1866 Noah MULL.  Sarah was born 04 Oct 1826 in Hopkins County, KY, the d/o Willis and Elizabeth (Parmenter) Jenkins who emigrated to Oregon in 1844.  Sarah married 01 Oct 1842 at the age of 16 to Andrew Jackson Masters. Their first child was born upon arrival at Methodist Mission at the Dalles
   "..she and her husband, in order to reach the Whitman mission near Walla Walla before arrival of their first child, left the slowly moving wagon train and started over the Blue mountains on horseback.  The Indians threatened so that in making a round-about way they discovered they were lost.  Provisions ran out.  Another day in the mountains found them overcome by hunger.  At night the wolves attacked and Mr. Masters pelted them away with stones.
  Next day the Indians stole their horses and Mr. Masters, taking his bride in his arms, said, `Why did I bring you out here to die alone on this mountain?'  She replied, `Let us trust in God,' and in a short time after their prayer, two friendly Indians appeared and with signs let them know they could get the horses returned for a little bright clothing.  Mr. Masters pulled off the red flannel shirt he was wearing and gave them, also, a bright silk handkerchief which he wore around his neck.  The horses were returned and the couple directed their path toward The Dalles where they arrived just a day ahead of the birth of their first child which was named after Dr. White, the attending physician.  This child lived only a short time (six months)."    
    Sarah stayed the winter while her husband continued on to the valley to find land.  The family settled in Washington Co until 1849 when they started for CA.  The family opened a hotel at Sutterville, three miles below Sacramento where they remained for one year.  They then returned by ship, being shipwrecked at the mouth of the Columbia.  They lost a great deal of their goods but managed to retain the $10,000 they had made in California.  After their return they kept a hotel for several years and then in 1854 built the home where they remained.  In 1856 her husband, Andrew, was shot by an angry neighbor over a dispute over property lines.   Sarah continued to live in Washington Co until her death at Reedsville, Washington Co, OR in Sep 1896.  She was the mother of six children by her first husband ( Marcus White, John Willis, Mary Elliott m'd a Lystrup., Thurston Lane, William Edward, Elizabeth Andrewm'd Calvin Jack Sr.) and three children by her second husband (Laura who became Mrs. Perry Steeples, Sarah who married J.B. Curran and Charles who lived on the home place with his mother); Sarah was buried in Hillsboro Cemetery, Hillsboro, Washington Co, OR  [Hillsboro Argus, Apr 2, 1953; An Illustrated History of the State of Oregon by H.K. Hines]

Overton JOHNSON: traveled in a party of eight separate from main body of emigrants; at times were in contact with Stewart party; at Fort Boise, BOARDMAN, JOHNSON and WINTER continued on to Oregon by the established route; went to CA in 1843; left Sutter's Fort 12 May 1845 for home; published work on his experiences with William H. Winter called "Route Across the Rocky Mountains, with a Description of Oregon and California

Clara Clarissa JONES (1818 -1893): m'd 1839 John B. Nelson; died in Yakima Co, WA where she is buried with her husband in the Nelson Cemetery

John JONES: settled for a time in Polk county; was member of party that explored and established the Southern route in 1846; later settled in CA and is believed to have died in Idaho.

John JOUETT (1804- ): m'd 1832 Lavinia [maiden name unknown]; wife did not come in 1843; John settled in Linn county; land claim application states that he arrived in Oregon August of 1852; if he came in 1843 he appears to have returned home to IL; his wife did not come west with him on either of his emigrations and a letter from her in 1854 states that she is alive and well; no indication if she ever came to OR

KEIZUR/KEIZER FAMILY RESEARCHERS:
Dan Keizur, a descendant, states that although the KEIZUR name has been spelled numerous ways the accepted spelling at the time of emigration was KEIZUR. It occurs under that spelling in most of the census records but when Keizer, Oregon was named in their honor it was spelled as Keizer rather than Keizur.

Beda Ann KEIZUR (1825-1880): m'd 1842 John Fulton FORD; d/o Thomas and Mary (Gurley) Keizur; was also known as Beede Ann Ford or Dr. B.A. Ford; 1850 living in Marion county

Elizabeth Jane KEIZUR (1835 -1911): m'd 1855 Hayden M. CORNELL; d/o Thomas and Mary (Gurley) Keizur; settled in Marion county; husband died in 1885 and is buried at Salem Pioneer Cemetery, Salem, Marion Co, OR ; Elizabeth never remarried and died in Marion county, OR

Francis Marion KEIZUR (1830 - ): m'd Mable ZIEBER; s/o Thomas and Mary (Gurley) Keizur; 1850 Francis is living in Marion county with parents; later moved to Lane county, OR

John Brooks KEIZUR (1824-1870): m'd 1851 Mary Jane HERREN; s/o Thomas and Mary (Gurley) Keizur; settled in Marion Co; John died of consumpion in 1870 and is buried at Salem Pioneer Cemetery, Salem, Marion Co, OR

Mary Louise KEIZUR (1817-1903): m'd 1836 Joseph HESS; d/o Thomas and Mary (Gurley) Keizur; settled in Yamhill county where her husband was listed as a merchant in the 1850 census

Matilda Caroline KEIZUR (1821-1900 ): m'd 1837 Samuel PENTER (div 1872); d/o Thomas and Mary (Gurley) Keizur; settled in Marion County

Pleasant Cicero Lewis KEIZUR (1828- ): m'd 1850 Sarah WOODSIDES; s/o Thomas and Mary (Gurley) Keizur; 1850 living in Marion County, OR

Sarah Lucinda KEIZUR (1818-1850): m1. 1834 Levi CORZINE/COZINE; m2. 1845 Joseph R. PATTERSON; d/o Thomas and Mary (Gurley) Keizur;  first husband died in 1841; Sarah died in May 1850; in the 1850 Marion county census her daughters Mary A. Corzine and Sarah Patterson are living with her second husband, Joseph Patterson, in the household of her brother, John B. Keizur

Thomas Cullwell KEIZUR (1833-1906): m'd 1855 Sarah Isabella RAMSEY; s/o Thomas and Mary (Gurley) Keizur; in 1850 Thomas is living at home in Marion County, OR; by 1870 he is living in Lane county where he lived and farmed until his death at Cottage Grove, Lane Co, OR

Thomas Dove KEIZUR (1793-1871): m'd 1813 Mary GURLEY; brother to Brooks and Pleasant; Thomas was born in Buncombe county, North Carolina;a family story states that upon his engagement to Mary Gurley she planted some cotton, picked it, spun it and knitted socks for her bride groom that he wore at his wedding and later, sons, Pleasant and John both wore them at their weddings; some years later these socks were placed in the Oregon Historical Society museum;  in 1828 the family  moved to Tennessee where they remained for about 5 years before moving to Arkansas in 1833; in 1842 they removed to Missouri where they began preparations for their emigration to Oregon;  after arrving in Oregon the family settled in Marion County; Thomas was elected to the legislature in 1844 and served until 1846 and then again in 1851-52; his wife died in 1853 and Thomas did not remarry; the Keizer family with daughters and sons owned about 2400 acres in what is now Keizer, Marion County, OR

William Henry Harrison KEIZUR (1839 - ): s/o Thomas and Mary (Gurley) Keizur; settled in Marion county where he lived intermittently with his father and brothers; no indication he ever married

KELSEY FAMILY RESEARCHER:
America KELSEY
(1832-1916): m'd 1846 George Francis WYMAN; d/o David & Susan (Cozzart) Kelsey; moved to CA in 1844; parents contracted smallpox, while nursing them she also contracted the disease; father died and mother moved back to OR; America married George Wyman at Sutter's Fort; lived out her life in CA; died in San Mateo Co, CA

David Crocket KELSEY (c1835-1882): s/o David & Susan (Cozzart) Kelsey; to CA 1844; returned with mother to OR after death of his father; listed in 1850 Washington Co, OR census; 1860 Jackson Co, OR listed as miner; 1870 was listed in San Mateo Co, CA census; died in San Mateo Co, CA

David KELSEY Sr. ( -c1845): m'd 1810 Susan Jane COZZART; s/o David & Jean (Kinkade) Kelsey; served in the war of 1812; 1843 to OR; wintered in OR; 1844 in Kelsey party that traveled to CA; died of smallpox after arriving in CA; buried in San Joaquin Co, CA; wife and son, David, returned to OR

Elizabeth KELSEY (1815-1888): m'd 1836 John Wesley EAST; d/o David & Susan (Cozzart) Kelsey; German American; continued mother's custom of wearing a fancy little German cap; emigrated with three small children; settled at Salt Creek near Dallas, OR; buried on knoll above their last home on Perrydale-Ballston hwy.

Frances Margaret "Fanny" KELSEY (c1830-1858): m'd 1844 Joseph Willard BUSSELL; d/o David & Susan (Cozzart) Kelsey; twin to Rebecca; moved to CA in 1844 shortly after marriage; 1847 husband built Buzzell's Tavern near Stockton; 1850 living in Santa Cruz; died in San Mateo Co, CA

Rebecca Josephine KELSEY (1830-1871): m1. 1843 William J. FOWLER; m2. 1845 Grove COOK; m3. Dr. C. GRATTAN; d/o David & Susan (Cozzart) Kelsey; twin to Frances Margaret; by Dec 1844 there were several letters to Thomas Oliver Larkin stating that Rebecca had left her husband and had received a legal divorce;

*3) William Clark KENNERLY: was nephew of General William Clark; was with Stewart's Hunting expedition; had a black slave named Cupid; narrowly missed death when he fell from and was dragged by his horse; MOHS "Persimmon Hill: A Narrative of Old St. Louis and the Far West" pp 143-67

Mr. KERRITOOK: In James Nesmith's diary entry for Monday, July 3, 1843, "An accident occurred today in our company.  Mr. Kerritook, a half-blood Cherokee, went out in the hills in quest of game.  In firing at an antelope his rifle burst at the breech and injured him severely, though not dangerously." [Information provided by Don Rivara]

Amos Natham KING: born c1883 in Massachusetts; was living in Missouri by 1840 and emigrated with family in 1845 emigration.  It is not known at this time if he came in 1843 and then returned to get his family

Solomon KING:

Rhoda KINZIE (1820- ): m'd 1841 James WHITE; m2. 1855 Horace RICE (div 1858); m3. 1859 Joseph H. HENESS (div 1861); m4. 1864 James Howe (he abandoned her the same year) m5. 1868 John CONNER
"Born about 1820, Rhoda Kinzie was married to James White January 18, 1841, in Berrien County, Michigan, when she was twenty; she was his second wife.  They had a daughter, Elizabeth Jane White, in 1842, the only one of the White children on the trail in 1843 for whom Rhoda was the mother and not the  stepmother. Rhoda was twenty-three during the crossing. The Whites settled on the Willamette River in Polk County opposite Salem. After arriving in Oregon, the Whites had more children:  Theodore, about 1845; Lavina, about 1848; and Rhoda, 1850. In 1846 they started the Salem ferry.  James was killed in 1854 when the steamboat Gazelle exploded near Oregon City, killing many passengers.  Rhoda and her stepsons continued to operate the ferry.  In October of 1855 she married Horace Rice, but the marriage soon ended in divorce.  In 1859 she married Joseph H. Heness, but this also ended in divorce. During the great flood of December of 1861, the ferryboat sank trying to rescue the wheat stored in riverfront warehouses.  In August of 1864 Rhoda married James Howe of Vancouver but was abandoned by him in November of the same year.  Her stepsons wanted out of the business, so Rhoda sold the ferry to Jasper Matheny of the 1843 migration.  She married John Conner on March 15, 1868."  [Information provided by Don Rivara, his sources in addition to this web site included: [1] pp.292-293, Polk County Pioneers--Study of the Inhabitants Listed in the 1850 Federal Census of Polk County, Oregon, by Shirley H. O'Neil, self-published, 2002]        "We headed Sweet Water and camped at a lake on the divide.  There James White struck his wife.  Bob Smith wanted to whip him, but Olinger thought he served her right for abusing his little girls." [ Recollections of An Oregon Pioneer of 1843 by Samuel Penter (OHSQ Vol 7 p55-61)]  

*4) Basil LAJEUNESSE: member of Fremont's second expedition; also accompanied Fremont on his first expedition; engaged at St. Louis, MO;  when party later split into two partys for exploration he stayed with Fremont; turned back for home on September 22

*4) Francois LAJEUNESSE: member of Fremont's second expedition;  when party later split into two partys for exploration he stayed with Fremont; turned back for home on September 22

Felix LAMBERT (c1824- ): m'd 1855 Veronique SANDERS

Isaac LASSWELL (1820-1897): m'd 1848 Rachel Emaline MCNARY; s/o John Lasswell; settled in Clackamas County where he is enumerated as a farmer in the 1850 and 1860 Clackamas county census; by 1870 is living in Washington where he is listed as a milk man in the Walla Walla census and a farmer in the 1880 Yakima Co, WA census

Susan LASSWELL (1817- ): m'd 1837 Hiram A. STRAIGHT; d/o John Lasswell; settled in Clackamas county with her family where she is shown enumerated in the 1850, 1860, 1870 and 1880 census; buried Hiram Straight Cemetery, Clackamas Co, OR

John LAUDERDALE:

Aaron Maxwell LAYSON (1820-1886): m1. 1843 Sarah Jane MATHENY; m2. Eliza ATHEY; s/o of David and Anna [Maxwell] Layson; settled in Yamhill Co; "At twenty-three years of age, Aaron had been elected as the chairman of the organizational meeting in Wesport with Peter H. Burnett as secretary. He had eloped with Sarah Jane Matheny, daughter of Henry and Rachel [Cooper] Matheny of the 1843 migration a few days before her wagon left Platte County.  He was traveling with the Matheny family. His sister, Sarah Jane Layson, had eloped with Adam Matheny at the same time.  Adam was the cousin of Aaron's wife and Aaron's close friend. Aaron later served in the Cayuse War with the Mathenys. Layson never applied for a donation land claim.  He had gone to the California gold fields in 1849 with his wife and family. "Camp fever" killed his wife, father-in-law and other relatives of his wife.  When he returned to Oregon, he lived with his widowed mother-in-law, who reared his children while he farmed  her land. They lived at what is now Hopewell, Yamhill County, Oregon.  Aaron didn't remarry until quite a while after his mother-in-law died in 1877.  Then he married Eliza Athey, a spinster sister of William Athey of the 1843 migration. Aaron died in 1886 at age sixty-six. He and his first wife are buried together in the Hopewell Cemetery, the land for which was donated by his mother-in-law. Their children were Anna, 1844, who married Wilson Gibson; James Robert Layson, 1847, who married late in life; and Cena Abigale Layson, 1849, who married Rev. Mark Bailey." [Information provided by Don Rivara; his sources include [1] Aaron and Sarah Jane [Matheny] Layson file of the Hewitt-Cooper-Matheny Family Association at the Yamhill County Historical Society Museum in Lafayette, Oregon.]

Sarah Jane LAYSON (1827-1847): m'd 1843 Adam M. MATHENY; d/o of David and Anna [Maxwell] Layson; eloped in 1843 with Adam Matheny at the same time that her brother, Aaron eloped with Sarah Matheny; mother of two children (David Layson Matheny, b. Aug 25, 1844 and Sarah Jane Matheny, b. Jan 20, 1847); died as a result of childbirth in Yamhill County four years after her arrival in the Oregon territory and is buried in the Hopewell Cemetery, Yamhill Co, OR

*4) Henry A.G. LEE : member of Fremont's second expedition; dispatched from Soda Springs with a note for Carson at Ft. Hall, directing him to load a pack horse and overtake the party;  when party later split into two partys for exploration he stayed with Fremont; turned back for home on September 22

David LENOX (1835-1899): m1.1865 Sarah Isabel CAMPBELL; m2. 1879 Margaret A. BOLSINGER; s/o David and Louisa (Swan) Lenox; settled in Washington Co, OR; father of 6 children with first wife (Edward Harvey, David Hudson, George Franklin, Charlotte Isabel, Clara Edith, Sarah Elizabeth); father of 2 children with second wife (Minnie Elah, Leona Candace)

Capt. David Thomas LENOX (1802-1873): m'd 1826 Louisa SWAN.  He emigrated with wife and eight children and became Captain of the train after Peter Burnett resigned.  David Lenox settled on the Tualatin Plains in Washington Co where he founded the West Union Baptist Church in 1844.  He was an active member in Democratic party; served as Justice of the Peace for Washington Co 1847-1848; was candidate for Washington Co probate judge in 1850.  He is not found in the 1870 census but his wife is living with her son, David Jr, in Washington Co.  Her husband had reportedly moved to Umatilla Co in 1870. David Lenox died outside of Weston, Umatilla Co, Oregon in 1873 and was buried at Blue Mountain Cemetery, although it is often referred to as the "Kees Cemetery".  The location of the grave was lost, relocated and rededicated in 1924. Then in 1960 the Oregon Baptists moved his remains and the bronze plaque to the West Union Baptist Church Cemetery, Washington Co, OR to be cared for along side of his wife, Louisa.  There is an ornate headstone in his honor at that location

Edward Henry LENOX (1827-1905): m1. 1850 Eleanor PORTER; m2. Anna P. [maiden name unknown]; s/o David and Louisa (Swan) Lenox; drove ox team across plains; settled in Washington county until about 1857 when he moved to Contra Costa, CA; wrote a reminiscence of overland journey called "Overland to Oregon"written 1904, republished by Ye Galleon Press, Fairfield, WA., 1970, 69pp; died at Oakland, Alameda Co, CA

Elizabeth J.  LENOX (1830-1866): m'd 1847 John Spencer WHITE; d/o David and Louisa (Swan) Lenox; settled in Washington county where she died in childbirth Apr 19, 1866; buried in West Union Cemetery, Washington Co, OR; mother of 10 children (Sarah Ann, Millard Fillmore, William Henry, David Lenox, Louisa, John Spencer, Mary Elizabeth, Woodson L., Lelah, Elizabeth M.)

Frances Deborah LENOX (1837-1915): m1. 1856 Henry C. SMITH; m2 1858 Andrew Jackson CONSTABLE; settled in Washington Co, OR until c1877 when she moved with husband and children to Skamokawa, Wahkiakum, WA where she died and is buried; mother of 12 children (2 unnamed, James, Lucy Jane, Louise, Mary Catharine, Margaret Ann, Andrew, George, Frances, Benedict, Elizabeth)

George Washington LENOX (1832-1881): m'd 1856 Rebecca E. MCCAY; s/o David and Louisa (Swan) Lenox; settled in Washington Co, OR where he remained until his death; father of 6 children (Sarah Delila, Samuel A., Mary A., William Owen, Margaret A., Elia A.)

Mary Ann LENOX (1828-1919): m'd 1848 Reuben W. FORD; d/o David and Louisa (Swan) Lenox; mother of 4 children (Josephine A., Franklin A., David L., William P.)  "Edward Lenox states in his recollections about after they had arrived in Oregon, "A school was soon organized and was held in the little Methodist church with a Mr. Ford from New York was our teacher.  Mr. Ford afterwards married my sister Mary, with whom he removed to New York and afterward to Texas." [Information provided by Don Rivara; his sources include [1] p.77,  Overland to Oregon, by Edward Lenox, written 1904, republished by Ye Galleon Press, Fairfield, Washington]

Samuel Swan LENOX (1840-1927): m1. 1863 Adelia A. RAYMOND; m2. 1891 Sarah FRANK; s/o David and Louisa (Swan) Lenox; settled in Washington County; living in Santa Clara, CA in 1870; divorced from second wife

Susan Amanda LENOX (1842 -1925): m'd 1857 William Crigg WHITE; d/o David and Louisa (Swan) Lenox;  settled in Washington County until 1857 when she was married in Yamhill Co; c1862 moved with husband and children to Umatilla Co, OR where she lived until her death; buried in Echo Cemetery, Umatilla Co, OR; mother of 12 children (William Sylvester, Lewis Owen, Elizabeth Amelia, Thomas Orby, Mary Lenox, Millard Fillmore, Rosella E., Harriet Frances, Delia May, Nancy Catherine, Jessie Lillian, John Edward)

*3) G. J. LEUDERS.:  German botanist traveling with the Stewart Party; turned back at Platte and went to Taos [Information provided by Don Rivara; his sources include[1] Wisconsin Magazine of History Volume XV, pp. 350-355]

LINEBARGER FAMILY RESEARCHER:
Andrew Jackson LINEBARGER
(1829-1861): m1. 1852 Lucy Eleanor GILMOUR; m2. 1857 Elizabeth MCBEE; s/o Lewis and Jane (Henderson) Linebarger; settled in Benton Co, OR; died of pneumonia while visiting his brother in Forest Grove; is buried in Union Cemetery, Forest Grove, Washington Co, OR (father of 1child by first marriage--Elizabeth; father of 2 children by second marriage--Nancy V., Mary J.)

Clementine LINEBARGER (c1824- ): d/o Lewis and Jane (Henderson) Linebarger; no indication she came to OR with family in 1843

Delilah LINEBARGER (1842-1924): m'd 1865 John Quincy ADAMS; d/o Lewis and Jane (Henderson) Linebarger; settled Linn Co where she is enumerated in the 1860 census with her parents and siblings; 1870 living with husband in Clackamas Co, OR; 1900 living with her sister and brother-in-law, Mary and Lovell Knighten in Linn County, OR; 1910 living with her sister, Virginia, in the home of her nephew, John Lewis Gilmour, in Kittitas Co, WA; Delilah died Apr 24, 1924 in Stanislaus Co, CA

Elizabeth Ann LINEBARGER (1825-1916): m1. 1842 Lewis C. COOPER; m2. 1865 James B. NAYLOR; d/o Lewis and Jane (Henderson) Linebarger; settled with husband in Washington Co and is enumerated there in 1850 census; by mid 1850s family had moved to Tulare Co, CA;  in 1870 Elizabeth and James Naylor and the children are listed in Santa Barbara County, CA where they were living next door to Elizabeth's brother, Lewis Linebarger; 1880 they are living in Kern County, CA;  Elizabeth died  Jul 20, 1916 in CA and James B. Naylor died Apr 2, 1917 in Los Angeles Co, CA;  Elizabeth was the mother of 8 children by first marriage--Sarah, Susan, Mary Jane, Franklin, Lulu, Elizabeth Gertrude, Bogardis, Andrew; mother of 1 child by second marriage--Virginia

Harriet LINEBARGER (c1823- ): m'd 1838 David MURPHY; no indication she came to OR with family in 1843

John Henderson LINEBARGER (1827-1886): m'd 1850 Barbara "Maria" DAVIS;s/o Lewis and Jane (Henderson) Linebarger; remained in Washington Co, OR until mid 1850s when he moved to Tulare Co, CA; shot and killed by drunken indian in Nevada; father of 9 children (Gertrude C., Lewis Edwin, John Byron, William Thurston, Alice, Allen Douglas, Nellie May, Sherman, Nettie)

Joseph LINEBARGER (1839-1918): m'd 1884 Mrs. Caroline (STRANG) Drumsmith; s/o Lewis and Jane (Henderson) Linebarger; moved to CA and is living with brother, Lewis in 1870 Santa Barbara County, CA census; in 1880 is living in Yakima County, WA and then moved to Idaho; 1900 and 1910 Joseph and Caroline are enumerated at LaGrande, Union County, OR where they are buried in the Grandview Cemetery, Union Co, OR; Joseph was the father of 6 children-- Minerva (1884), Oscar (1886), Harry (1889), Raleigh LeRoy (1891), Helen (1893) and Christina W. (1895)

Lewis Jr. "Luke" LINEBARGER (1836-1910): m'd 1858 Melinda Frances BLEVINS; s/o Lewis and Jane (Henderson) Linebarger; 1850 settled in Linn Co; was living in Contra Costa Co, CA by 1858; died in Los Angeles, CA and is buried in the Inglewood Park Cemetery, Los Angeles Co, CA

Lewis Sr. LINEBARGER (1800-1883): m'd 1822 Jane HENDERSON; s/o John and Anna Maria (Hoote) Linebarger; resided in Park Co, IN until about 1832 when he relocated to Macoupin Co, IL with his family;  in 1840 they were living in MO where they remained until 1843 when they removed to OR;  Lewis and family settled in Linn Co in 1853 where he remained until his death in 1883; buried in Sand Ridge Cemetery, Linn Co, OR; father of 11 children (Harriet, Elizabeth Ann, John Henderson, Andrew Jackson, William, Mary Grace, Lewis "Luke", Joseph, Delilah, and twins, Frances Marion, and Virginia who were born in OR)

Mary Grace LINEBARGER (1833-1909): m'd 1852 Lovell KNIGHTEN; d/o Lewis and Jane (Henderson) Linebarger; settled in Linn Co where she remained until her husband's death in 1905 when she moved to WA to live with her son Oliver; mother of 11 children (Minerva, Elinor Gertrude, William, Isaac T., Lewis Dalazon, Aramitita M., Commodore, Oliver, Olive "Anna", Ada M., Harry C.); buried in Albany Cemetery, Albany, OR next to her husband

William LINEBARGER (1831-1906): m1. 1860 Cathryn MILLER; m2. 1869 Cecilia Ann COLE; s/o Lewis and Jane (Henderson) Linebarger; settled in Linn Co, OR; was in CA by 1870 when he married his second wife; settled in Ventura Co, CA (father of two children by first marriage-Mary and Dallison Smith; father of 5 children by second marriage--F.E., Clementine, Olive, California Dora "Callie", John George)

*2) Milton LITTLE : cutoff from Fort Hall for California with the Joseph Childs company;

Dr. John Edwin LONG ( -1846): m'd 1845 Frances Caroline CASON; elected Territorial Clerk during formation of Provisional Government; director of Oregon Printing Assn; drowned in the Clackamas River in July 1846

Benjamin Franklin LOONEY (1842-1923): m1. 1865 Martha E. TERHUNE; m2. Josephine DEARDORFF; s/o Jesse and Ruby (Bond) Looney; successful farmer in Marion county; at Jefferson, OR of carcinoma of bladder; buried Jefferson Cemetery, Jefferson, Marion Co, OR; father of 4 children (Maria Belle by first marriage; Delman D., Everett F., Georgia Anna by second marriage)

Fauntleroy LOONEY (1835-1856): s/o Jesse and Ruby (Bond) Looney; died of typhoid fever at age 22; buried at Looney Cemetery, Jefferson, Marion Co

Francis Marion LOONEY (1832-1842): s/o Jesse and Ruby (Bond) Looney; some records state he died shortly after arrival in Oregon Territory while others state that he died in MO prior to emigration

Jesse LOONEY (1802-1869): m'd 1827 Ruby Crawford BOND; settled near Jefferson in Marion Co; buried at Looney Cemetery, Marion Co; was first cousin to President Andrew Johnson; raised on a plantation in Knoxville, TN; moved to Alabama as a young man and then spent some time in IL and WI before moving to MO prior to his emigration to OR; in 1850s his farm was an official stop for the CA-OR stage coach line; developed one of the largest orchards in his part of the territory, active in helping to build churches and schools; member of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church; served as a member of the Provisional Legislature; father of 15 children (Susan B., Francis Marion, Fautley Roy, John Bond, Mary Ellen, Jesse Walton, Benjamin Franklin, stillborn twins, Pauline Ruby Cain, William Nathan, David Henry, Norris Humphrey, Frances Margaret, Addie Belle); A Letter by One of the Immigrants of 1843

Jesse Walton LOONEY (1839-1908): m'd 1861 Mary Ann GUNSAULUS; s/o Jesse and Ruby (Bond) Looney; setted near Jefferson, Marion Co; died of typhoid fever; buried Jefferson Cemetery, Jefferson, Marion Co, OR; father of 4 children (Charles M., Frederick E., William Franklin, Walton Jesse)

John Bond LOONEY (1836-1926): m1. Sarah Jane COX; m2. Frances MALLORY; state senator, elected twice from Marion Co; s/o Jesse and Ruby (Bond) Looney; died at Mill City, Linn Co, OR of cerebral hemorrhage; buried Looney Cemetery, Marion Co; father of 5 children (Laroy by first marriage; Jessie Augusta, Victor Delmont, Walter Winfield and Mildred Mallory by second marriage)

Mary Ellen LOONEY (1838-1917): m'd 1857 Abner Pendleton GAINES; d/o Jesse and Ruby (Bond) Looney; husband was the son of the second territorial governor of Oregon; died at Independence, Polk Co, OR of cancer of the stomach; Mary is buried at Salem Pioneer Cemetery, Salem, Marion Co, OR

Susan LOONEY (1830-1905): m1. 1848 John H. BOSWORTH; m2. 1851 Frederick STEIWER; d/o Jesse and Ruby (Bond) Looney; mother of 5 children (Maria Ruby by first marriage; Winlock William, Jesse Looney, John Frederick, Gustav by second marriage); buried Looney Cemetery, Jefferson, Marion Co, OR; mother of  8 children (Archie Anna, Ida E., John Pollard, Richard Looney, Chester B., Hattie B., Mattie D., Wilbur William)

Twins LOONEY (1843-1843): c/o Jesse and Ruby (Bond) Looney; stillborn twins born May 22, 1843 on the trail

*3) J. LOUGHBOROUGH : "He was among a group that left the migration at the Platte River and headed south to Taos, New Mexico." [Information provided by Don Rivara]

Asa LOVEJOY: was emigrant of 1842; had returned east winter of 1842; was returning to Oregon territory with Dr. Whitman; member of small party organized by Dr. Whitman to travel in advance of wagon train; listed on scout list for 1843

*3) F. LUGUR: turned south at the Platte River to go to Taos, then a town of the Mexican province of New Mexico; listed in one place as F. Sugar

Malinda Walton LUNSFORD (1805-1885): m'd 1825 Daniel WALDO; Malinda was born into an old southern family, her mother was directly related to George Walton, a signer of the Declaration of Independence; her family moved to MO when she was young and it was there that she met and married Daniel Waldo; after arrival in the Oregon Territory the family settled in Marion county where they spent the majority of their lives; Malinda was the mother of 10 (11?) children (three children died prior to emigration, the remaining children died in Oregon,  they include: Ann Josephine, Avarilla, David, Jedediah, John Breckenridge, Mary P., Narcissa, and William); Malinda is buried at Salem Pioneer Cemetery, Salem, Marion Co, OR

Sarah LUSTER (1804-1896): m1. Alexander ZACHARY; m2. 1860 Henry B. BONES

Mr. LUTHER:

Nathan Parsons MACK (1813-1893): m1. Mary CLUM; m2. 1849 Mary ARTHUR; arrived on the ship Fama in May 1843; native of Mass; settled in Clackamas Co where he is listed in the census as both a carpenter and a farmer; moved into Marion Co sometime after the 1860 census; by the time of his death he had been an invalid for several years and was supporting himself from the sales he received from a little truck garden and help from the county;  Nathan is buried at Salem Pioneer Cemetery, Salem, Marion Co, OR   

MALONE FAMILY RESEARCHER:
Madison MALONE
(1817-1880): m'd 1840 Virginia [maiden name unknown]; m2. 1852 Margaret EATON; s/o Richard and Eve (McDonald) Malone; first wife died on claim in 1851 leaving 3 children; settled in Yamhill county; father of 8 children (Margaret, William, Richard by first marriage; Virginia, Mary, Riley, Ann, and Hoyt by second marriage)

Margaret MALONE (c1842- ): m'd 1857 Jackson T. SNELLING; d/o Madison and Virginia Malone; enumerated in the 1860 WA census but by 1870 her only living child, a daughter, Edith, is living with a Snelling uncle with no listing for her parents found.  It is assumed they are deceased by this point.

Emily "Millie" MALONE (1792-1861): m'd 1818 William ARTHUR; d/o Richard and Eve (McDonald) Malone; buried Arthur Cemetery, Clackamas Co, OR; mother of 8 children (David, Brazilla, Richard, Robert, Mahala, William, Melissa, and Mary)

Richard D. MALONE (1834- ): m'd 1856 Mary E. EASTON; s/o Robert and Matilda (Arthur) Malone; mother died when he was 9 months old and his father was killed by the kick from a horse when Richard was only 5 years old.  His uncle, William Arthur, took guardianship of him and raised him to adulthood;  Richard became well known in Hillsboro as a builder and contractor; was a Baptist and a Deacon in his church

Virginia MALONE (1822-1851): m'd 1840 Madison MALONE; died on claim in Yamhill Co on 12 Nov 1851 leaving three children (Margaret, William and Richard); maiden name unknown at this time

MANNING FAMILY RESEARCHER:
Frances MANNING
(1843-1843): d/o John and Almeda (Boyd) Manning; born and died on the trail

James Aaron MANNING (1823-1892): m'd 1847 Naoma RICHARDSON; s/o John and Lovisa (Collier) Manning; settled in Benton Co where is is listed as Thomas in the 1850 Benton Co census;  1860 Benton Co Census lists family under James; died and is buried in Cheshire, Lane Co, OR

John MANNING (1801-1873): m1. 1821Lovisa Jane COLLIER; m2. 1840 Almeda BOYD; emigrated to OR with four of his five children, the oldest son, Absalom Manning did not emigrate until 1851; John left OR for CA in 1849 taking his wife and two youngest children, William and Nathaniel; the family is listed in the 1850 and 1860 Sonoma Co Census records; 1870 Sonoma Co census records John is running a saloon with his son, William; Almeda died in Sonoma Co in 1872 and John in 1873.

Mary MANNING (1830-1869): m'd 1844 Lancaster CLYMAN; d/o John and Lovisa (Collier) Manning; moved to CA in 1849 with her family; shown living with husband next to her parents in the 1850 and 1860 Sonoma Co census records; Mary died in 1869 Sonoma Co, CA

Nathaniel E. MANNING (1842-1927): m'd c1867 Kate R. STANLEY; s/o John and Almeda (Boyd) Manning; listed in Sonoma Co census records as a carpenter and a clerk in a saw mill; appears to have remained in CA until his death in 1927

William H. MANNING (1841-bef 1900 ): s/o John and Almeda (Boyd) Manning; 1870 Sonoma Co census records show William running a saloon with his father, John.  John died in 1873 and William is found living with his brother, Nathaniel, in the 1880 Sonoma Co census records; William is deceased by 1900

Clementine Caroline MARTIN (1830-1843): d/o Nehemiah and Eliza; died 14 May 1843 shortly after emigration began

James MARTIN :

John Willard MARTIN (1836-1871): s/o Nehemiah and Eliza (Middick) Martin. John is shown living in Yamhill county through the 1870 census.  It appears he was unmarried.  He was not married in the 1870 census and died in 1871.

Julius MARTIN: cutoff from Fort Hall for California with the Joseph Childs company

Mary Sophia MARTIN (1833-1893): m'd 1850 Isaiah Morris JOHNS; d/o Nehemiah and Eliza (Middick) Martin.  After her marriage to Isaiah Johns she settled with her family near McMinnville in Yamhill County.  The family remained there until sometime before the 1880 census when the family is found living in Walla Walla County, WA.  It appears both Mary and Isaiah died in Washington.  Mary was the mother of three known children (Maurice Melville, Willena Adna and Mary Eveline).

Nancy Melvina MARTIN (1842-1921): m'd 1861 Alexander WATT; d/o Nehemiah and Eliza (Middick) Martin.  Nancy was the mother of 5 children (Clarence, Edson, Martha, and Lynn A.) She settled with her husband in Yamhill county.  I did not find the family in the 1880 census but by 1900 they are living in Spokane County, WA.  Her husband was listed as a US Postmaster at that time.

Nehemiah MARTIN (1805-1869): m'd 1827 Eliza Lois MIDDICK.  Nehemiah emigrated to Oregon with his wife and 4 children, Clementine, Mary, John and Nancy.  Two of their children, Abigail Jane and Ann Eliza had died prior to the emigration.  Nehemiah settled near Dayton in Yamhill Co where he remained until his death.  Five more children were born in Yamhill Co (Jerome, Caroline, Isaiah, Henry and Flint).

William MARTIN : a party left Platte City, MO May 5th consisting of  William Martin, William Sheldon, M.P. Dougherty, Lindsay Tharp and Parson Reading and arrived at Fitzhugh Mill, a place of rendezvous for those wishing to go to Oregon; became pilot at Fort Hall but turned off for CA with the Chiles party Capt. William Martin Reminiscences

William Jennings MARTIN: turned off at Fort Hall for CA, returned east in 1844 and emigrated again in 1846.

Andrew Jackson MASTERS (1816-1856): m'd 1842 Sarah Jane JENKINS.  They had their first child upon arrival at the mission at the Dalles.
     "..she and her husband, in order to reach the Whitman mission near Walla Walla before arrival of their first child, left the slowly moving wagon train and started over the Blue mountains on horseback.  The Indians threatened so that in making a round-about way they discovered they were lost.  Provisions ran out.  Another day in the mountains found them overcome by hunger.  At night the wolves attacked and Mr. Masters pelted them away with stones.
  Next day the Indians stole their horses and Mr. Masters, taking his bride in his arms, said, `Why did I bring you out here to die alone on this mountain?'  She replied, `Let us trust in God,' and in a short time after their prayer, two friendly Indians appeared and with signs let them know they could get the horses returned for a little bright clothing.  Mr. Masters pulled off the red flannel shirt he was wearing and gave them, also, a bright silk handkerchief which he wore around his neck.  The horses were returned and the couple directed their path toward The Dalles where they arrived just a day ahead of the birth of their first child which was named after Dr. White, the attending physician.  This child lived only a short time."    
    Sarah stayed the winter while her husband continued on to the valley to find land.  Their first child died during this time at the age of 6 months.  The family settled in Washington Co until 1849 when they started for CA.  The family opened a hotel at Sutterville, three miles below Sacramento where they remained for one year.  They then returned by ship, and were  shipwrecked at the mouth of the Columbia.  They lost a great deal of their goods but managed to retain  the $10,000 they had made in California.  After their return they kept a hotel for several years and then in 1854 built the home where they remained.  In 1856 her husband, Andrew, was shot by an angry neighbor in a dispute over property lines. The neighbor, Mr. McMillan was later acquitted based on self defense  Andrew was the father of six children  (Marcus White, John Willis, Mary Elliott m'd a Lystrup., Thurston Lane, William Edward, Elizabeth Andrew m'd Calvin Jack Sr.) [Hillsboro Argus, Apr 2, 1953; An Illustrated History of the State of Oregon by H.K. Hines]

Marcus White MASTERS (1843-1844): s/o Andrew and Sarah (Jenkins) Masters.  Marcus was born the day after arriving at the Dalles.  He was named after Dr. White who had aided in his birth.  Marcus died at age 6 months while residing at the Dalles mission with his mother.

MATHENY FAMILY RESEARCHERS:
Adam
M. MATHENY (1820-1895): m1. Sarah Jane LAYSON; m2. 1850 Harriet HAMILTON; s/o Daniel and Mary (Cooper) Matheny; settled in Yamhill Co, OR; father of 13 children (David Layson and Sarah Jane by his first marriage; Daniel, Caroline, Wilson H., Henry, Isaiah, Cordelia, Josephine, Grant, Minerva Maud, William H., and Cora by his second marriage)

Charlotte MATHENY (1838-1926): m'd 1852 John B. KIRKWOOD; d/o Daniel and Mary (Cooper) Matheny; died in Los Angeles, CA; buried in Hopewell Cemetery, Hopewell, Yamhill Co, OR; was 5 years old during the emigration.  After the turn of the century she wrote a book on the emigration.  It made mention of many of the early Oregon Pioneers.  It was published in 1991 by the family; mother of 10 children (William Jay, Mary Christiana, Glen O., John Dale, Daniel Emmanuel, Arthur Murry, Nellie, Walter Rollo, Lenore, Mona "Pearl" [*Into The Eye of the Setting Sun by Charlotte Matheny Kirkwood is a reminiscence of the emigration of 1843 and early Oregon. It is available through Marion County Historical Society and descendant Don Rivara ]

Daniel Boone MATHENY (1829-1890): m'd 1851 Margaret Elizabeth MCDONALD; s/o Daniel and Mary (Cooper) Matheny; father of 6 children (Elizabeth, Mary, Dwight Herbert, May, Jocelyn Grey, Collin D.)

Daniel MATHENY Sr. (1793-1872): m'd 1819 Mary "Polly" COOPER; s/o Isaiah and Rachel (Younger) Matheny; settled in Yamhill Co; built and operated a ferry across the Willamette near Wheatland with his brother, Henry; buried Hopewell Cemetery, Yamhill Co, OR; father of 10 children (Adam M., Elizabeth, Rachel, Isaiah Cooper, Sarah, Daniel Boone, Mary Elizabeth, Jasper Newton, David D., Charlotte)

David MATHENY (c1843- ): s/o Daniel and Mary (Cooper) Matheny; listed in 1850 census with Charlotte and Jasper living in household of William and Jane Miller

Elizabeth MATHENY (1823-1899): m'd Henry HEWETT; d/o Daniel and Mary (Cooper) Matheny;
"Elizabeth was born 26 March 1823, in Owen County, Indiana, the daughter of Daniel and Mary [Cooper] Matheny of the '43 migration.  The family moved to Edgar County, Illinois, in 1824.  They were there six years before moving to Schuyler County, Illinois in 1830. When Elizabeth was fourteen, the family moved to Platte County, Missouri. There she married Henry Hewitt on 25 February 1841. When she was seventeen and he, eighteen.  They were nineteen and twenty when they crossed the plains to Oregon two years later.  By that time they had a daughter, Ann Eliza, age two.  They spent the first year in Oregon lived on the Tualatin Plains near present-day Hillsboro, Washington County, Oregon.  The following year they purchased the farm of Joseph McLaughlin, son of Dr. John McLaughlin, in Yamhill County, at the site of present-day Unionvale.  This was close to Elizabeth's parents' land claim.  In 1875 the Hewitt's purchased the Salem ferry from Elizabeth's brother, Jasper Matheny, leaving their sons to farm their Donation Land Claim twelve miles away in Yamhill County.  They built a new home on the Polk County side of the Willamette River at Salem.  Later they traded the land they owned in Polk County for some in Multnomah County on the mountain that is now called Mt. Scott.  In 1882 they sold this land to Harvey Scott and returned to live in their old home on their Donation Land Claim. Henry died January 15,1899, and Elizabeth died later that year on October 13.  Both were seventy-six at the time of death.  They are buried at the Hopewell Cemetery, Hopewell, OR.  The Hewitts were married fifty-seven years at the time of Henry's death.  Their sons born in Oregon were Daniel Matheny Hewitt, 1844-1915; Henry Harrison Hewitt, 1846-1931; Adam Wesley Hewitt, 1849-1930; James Andrew Hewitt, 1851-1925; Isaiah Cooper Hewitt, 1854-1930; Matthew Cresswell Hewitt, 1857-1945; Jasper Lewis Hewitt, 1859-1946; Horry Wilbur Hewitt, 1865-1947; and Dr. Lorin Leroy Hewitt, 1869-1950." [Information provided by Don Rivara]

Henry Younger MATHENY (1800-1849): m'd 1822 Rachel COOPER; s/o Isaiah and Rachel (Younger) Matheny; settled in Yamhill Co; built and operated a ferry across the Willamette near Wheatland with his brother, Daniel; went to CA with other family members; died in 1849 of camp fever while seeking gold;
" Henry was born in Kentucky, probably in Hardin County.  He was a brother to Daniel Matheny.  His wife was Rachel Cooper, whom he married July 4, 1822, in Owen County, Indiana. Her sister was married to Daniel Matheny. They probably had six children according to the old census records, but only two lived to marry. He served on the grand jury of Platte County, Missouri, in 1839.  He did not serve in the military due to a strange malady.  He would suddenly not know where he was or how he got there.  He was ashamed and would never ask for directions.  As a result, he would frequently disappear and have to be found.  He and his wife established a Donation Land Claim at what is now Hopewell, Yamhill County, Oregon.  They donated the land for the Hopewell Cemetery.  In 1849 Henry went to the California gold fields, where he caught camp fever and died.  He was buried in what is now the Coloma Cemetery in El Dorado County, CA.  His daughter Sarah Jane [Matheny] Layson, the wife of Aaron Layson, also died in the epidemic as did Henry's father-in-law, Isaiah Cooper, and his brother-in-law, John M. Cooper.  His other daughter, Lucy Ann Matheny married Joseph Kirkwood and established a large family of Kirkwoods with her many sons." [Information provided by Don Rivara]

Isaiah Cooper MATHENY (1826-1906): m'd 1850 Emaline ALLEN; s/o Daniel and Mary (Cooper) Matheny; settled Polk Co; died in Seattle, WA while visiting his son; buried in Ashland Cemetery, Ashland, Jackson Co, OR;  father of 6 children (Neal G., Gale H., Mary, Albert, Dow Lorenzo, Charlotte)

Isaiah Cooper MATHENY (1827-1852): s/o Henry and Rachel (Cooper) Matheny; "Not much is known about Isaiah.  He was born in Owen County, Indiana, about 1827, the son of Henry Matheny and Rachel [Cooper] Matheny.  It appears that he served in the Cayuse War and applied for a Donation Land Claim in Yamhill County.  He appears to have died about 1852 because there is a probate of his estate.  He was not married and was about twenty-five years old when he died.  He may be buried in the Hopewell Cemetery established by his parents.  If so, there is no tombstone surviving.  It is also possible that he died in the California gold fields.  He was a double cousin to Isaiah Cooper Matheny." [Information provided by Don Rivara] 

Jasper Newton MATHENY (1834-1893): m1. Elizabeth LEE; m2. 1852 Mary Bell RING; s/o Daniel and Mary (Cooper) Matheny; in the late 1850 was a delegate to the Democatic convention in Yamhill Co; by 1862 is elected alderman of Salem;  the next year he has built and is operating a new steam ferry for Willamette River; is indicted in 1865 for running his ferry on a Sunday but charges are dismissed; Nov 1865 has sold out his interest in the ferry and was building a stone wharf above the ferry landing; in 1866 was elected Salem city marshall; was always active in the affairs of the community; Jasper died on board a ship enroute from Mexico to San Francisco, CA; buried in Masonic Cemetery, San Francisco, CA; father of 11 children (Lorenzo Dow, Henry Leuder, Albert Lee, Laura Bell, Ida Rose, Mary Ella, Minnie Maude, Alice Gertrude, Sarah Agnes, Guy Fox "Guido", Jasper Claud) [photo contributed by Van Atkins]

Louisiana Catherine MATHENY (1829-1908): m'd 1847 Joseph KIRKWOOD; d/o Henry and Rachel (Cooper) Matheny; buried in Hopewell Cemetery, Yamhill Co, OR

Mary MATHENY  (1832-1908): m'd 1846 Joseph M. GARRISON; d/o Daniel and Mary (Cooper) Matheny;  "Mary was 13 and Joseph was 33 when they married.  Joseph's claim lay on part of the old Jason Lee Mission in Mission Bottom, Marion County, Oregon, twelve miles north of Salem.  Across the Willamette River in Yamhill County was the land claim of Daniel and Mary [Cooper] Matheny, the parents of his second wife, where the Mathenys established the town of Wheatland and the Wheatland ferry.  A wharf that Joseph constructed on the Willamette by his land was called "Garrison's Landing.
   Advertisements in the Salem newspaper show that the Garrisons were trying to sell their land claim in 1861, but were not successful.  That December was the great flood that wiped out Wheatland and Champoeg.  The Garrison farm, on the bottom land, was flooded.  The flood came quickly, and the family retreated to the second floor of their home.  Neighbors made their way to the Garrison home to seek refuge in the second story.  They were rescued by friends with boats.  The old Garrison home was still standing until 1993, when termite infestation required it to be razed.
        After finally selling their destroyed farm, the Garrisons moved quite frequently.  At first they lived on another farm in Marion County. Then they were living in Clatsop County in 1875, from where Joseph sent news to the Salem Statesman about a shipwreck, and on Hood River, in Wasco County, by 1877.  By 1880 the Garrison had moved to The Dalles, where Joseph served as superitendent of schools.  In 1882 he suffered a paralytic stroke and died in January of 1884 at the age of seventy.  Mary survived him by twenty-four years, dying in the Sellwood district of Portland in 1908.  He is buried in The Dalles, she at Hopewell in Yamhill County.  The Garrisons' six children were Daniel David Garrison [1847-1909], an epileptic who never married; Mary Garrison [Hall] [1848-1904]; Isaiah Joseph M. Garrison [1849-1937]; Jasper Enoch Garrison [1852-1913]; Ada May Garrison [Evans] [1857-1929]; and  Emily Olive "Emma" Garrison [Barrett][Frizzell][1859-1931]." [information provided by Don Rivara. His Sources included: [1] The History of the Hewitt-Matheny-Cooper Family, by Don Rivara, based on the research of Julie Jones, Gary Burlingame, and Don Rivara, 1996, self-published; [2] Life and Labour of Rev. A. E. Garrison, 1887, Pages 57-58, 122,   memoirs of Abraham Garrison, brother to Enoch and Joseph M. Garrison, who were in the 1843 migration.  Abraham didn't come west until 1846 along the Applegate Trail.]

Nancy Ann MATHENY (1837-1915): m'd 1852 William Powell ALLEN; d/o William Matheny; born IL and died Cottage Grove, OR; originally settled with parents in Yamhill Co

Sarah Jane MATHENY (1825-1849): m'd LAYSON, Aaron Maxwell; d/o Henry and Rachel (Cooper) Matheny; "Sarah Jane had been born about 1825 in Owen County, Indiana.  She was the daughter of Henry and Rachel [Cooper] Matheny of the 1843 migration.  A few days before her parents' wagons left Platte County, Missouri, Sarah Jane went to serve as a witness at the elopement wedding of her best friend, Sarah Jane Layson, to Adam Matheny, the cousin of our subject Sarah Jane.  To be best man, Adam had chosen his best friend, Aaron Layson, the brother of the bride-to-be.  It ended up being a double wedding.  The two girls, in effect, ended up trading last names.  Sarah Jane Matheny became Sarah Jane [Matheny] Layson, and Sarah Jane Layson became Sarah Jane [Layson] Matheny.  If this isn't confusing enough, all were in the migration to Oregon in 1843, and all are buried at the Hopewell Cemetery at Hopewell in Yamhill County except Adam Matheny.   Our subject Sarah Jane went to the California gold fields with her husband Aaron.  There camp fever broke out and Sarah Jane died at the age of about twenty-four.  Also dying of the fever were Sarah Jane's father, Henry Matheny, her grandfather, Isaiah Cooper, and her uncle, John Cooper.  Aaron brought Sarah Jane's body back to what is now Hopewell, Oregon, where they lie side by side, even though Aaron was survived by his second wife.  Sarah Jane's mother reared her motherless children while Aaron tilled his widowed mother-in-law's farm.  Sarah Jane's children were Elizabeth Layson [Wilson], 1844; James R., 1847; and Cena Abigale  [Bailey], 1849."  [Information provided by Don Rivara; his sources include [1] Aaron and Sarah Jane [Matheny] Layson file of the Hewitt-Cooper-Matheny Family Association at the Yamhill County Historical Society Museum in Lafayette, Oregon.] 

MATNEY FAMILY RESEARCHER:
Walter Jefferson MATNEY
(1817-1874): m1. 1847 Martha Jane [maiden name unknown]; m2. 1853 Julia Ann COOPER, ; s/o Broadwater and Sarah (McCully/McCullough) Matney; Walter died in Modoc County, CA; was father of 10 children; also see MATNEY FAMILY by Dan Matney
"Walter was twenty-six year
s old in 1843 when he signed on to drive one of the wagons of Alexander Zachary, who Matney would indelibly learn was the cruelest man in the 1843 immigration.  As Zachary's provisions began to  diminish, he informed Matney that  he would have to provide his own provisions thereafter.  When Matney protested, Zachary fired him and left him without resources in the wilderness. Perhaps it was after this that Matney rode the very small jackass that Edward Lennox spoke of in his recollection."We had a great deal of fun also with a man by the name of Mataney [sic].  Mataney was about six and a half feet tall, and when he was on his donkey, his feet nearly touched the ground.  To him the boys would say, "Get off that rabbit and carry him!"  "Presently J.W. Nesmith bought the jack for five hundred dollars, mounted him, and rode off without paying for him, so Mataney sued Nesmith.  The company appointed Burnett as judge.  A trial was held at night.  Nesmith pleaded non-jurisdiction and won the case.  The next day Nesmith rode the jack, and Mataney walked and knew not what to do, but along toward night, Nesmith having had his fill of the fun, got off, saying, 'Here Mataney, take this rabbit, I wouldn't have such a thing.' Mataney mounted the creature and was happy once more." Matney married his first wife in 1847.  Apparently she died and he married Julia Ann Cooper in 1853.  Matney settled on a Donation Land Claim in Polk County, where he died in 1874" [ Information provided by Don Rivara; in addition to this web site his sources include [1] Our Proud Past, by Gail I. McCormick, self-published, p. 17 [James Nesmith's Diary of 1843, extracted from the Oregon Historical Quarterly, December 1906]; [2] Overland to Oregon, by Edward Lenox, pp.56]

MAUZEY FAMILY RESEARCHER:
William MAUZEY
(1819- ): m'd 1847 Eleanor EVANS, ; m2. Martha [maiden name unknown]; settled in Washington Co; was listed in 1850 Sacramento, CA census as a trader; family had returned to Oregon by 1853 when a daughter was born; buried at West Union Baptist Church Cemetery, Washington Co, OR; father of 6 children (Lucinda J., Thomas A., Maria, Martha Anna, May Latitia, Peter)

*4) Mr. MAXWELL : member of Fremont's second expedition; "May 17, ..near the junction of the Kansas River with the Missouri, Maxwell, a member of the first expedition to remain as far as the Upper Arkansas

William MAYS:

Morton Mathew MCCARVER (1807-1871): m1. 1830 Mary Ann JENNINGS; m2. Julia BUCKALEW; c1821 worked as hand on flatboat headed for New Orleans; went to Texas; 1833 was in IA staking out the site of Burlinton; 1838 was commissary general of the IA militia; 1843 founded town of Linnton with Peter H. Burnett; 1844-45 was member of the Legislative Committee of the Provisional Government of Oregon; 1848 managed the platting of Sacramento, CA; 1849 was member of the CA Constitutional Convention at Monterey, CA; was commissary general for Oregon troops during the Rogue River and Yakima Indian Wars; 1868 founded Tacoma, WA; [review of publication "McCarver and Tacoma" by Thomas W. Prosch, son-in-law of McCarver]; letter printed in 1843 and reprinted in Nebraska State Historical Society 20 (1922) p.123-25;
"Morton was born in Kentucky in 1807.  He left home at the age of fourteen and spent time on the Mississippi River, Louisiana, and Texas.  In 1830 he married Mary Ann Jennings and two years later moved to Iowa.  There he was one of the founders of the town of Burlington.  In Oregon he established the town of Lincoln, which is now part of Portland.  His wife died in 1844, and he married Mrs. Julia A. Buckalew.  In 1848 he went to California during the gold rush, where he helped lay out the city of Sacramento.  He was elected to the California legislature and was a member of the California constituitonal c
onvention.  He later helped found the city of Tacoma, Washington.  The frame  home built by McCarver still exists in Oregon City.  It is called Locust Farm by the Pratt family, who owns it." [Information provided by Don Rivara; his sources include [1]  Our Proud Past, by Gail I. McCormick, self-published, pp 13, [James Nesmith's Diary of 1843, extracted from the Oregon Historical Quarterly, December 1906]; [2]   pp. 42-43, by Mrs. Forbes B. Pratt, Oregon Historical Landmarks, pub. by Oregon Society Daughters of the American Revolution, 1957] 

MCCLANE FAMILY RESEARCHER:
John Burch MCCLANE
(1820-1892 ): m'd 1849 Helen C. JUDSON; s/o John and Mary (Swallow) McClane; John was born in Philadelphia Jan 31, 1820.  In 1842 he removed to TX and shortly thereafter to IA.  In 1843 he joined the emigration to the Oregon Territory, driving the first wagon from Fort Hall to Oregon.  He spent only a short time with the main migration, being one of a small party selected by Dr. Whitman to go in advance of the wagon train.  A letter regarding his emigration in 1843 is available at University of California Berkley Library, Recollections, mss, 13pp.  Upon arrival in Oregon Territory he settled in the Salem area of Marion Co where he engaged in flour milling and lumber mills.  He was a volunteer in the Cayuse War.  In 1848 he went to CA and upon his return he bought a stock of general merchandise that he used to open the second store in Salem. 1850 he was appointed first postmaster of Salem and elected to be county treasurer.  John returned east in 1850 where he remained for three years.  Upon his return he was state librarian from 1865-1872 and  US Indian Agent at Grand Ronde from 1885-1889.  He died Jan 21, 1892 and is buried in  Salem Pioneer Cemetery, Salem, Marion Co, OR  along with his wife and other family members.

Alexander MCCLELLAN (c1773-1843): drowned when boat capsized in rapids near The Dalles;
"Alexander McClellan was an adopted member of the Lindsay Applegate family.  They called him "Uncle Mac."  McClellan was a surrogate grandfather for the Applegate children.  He had come to the Applegate home years before looking for work.  Gradually he became one of them.  He was about seventy years old at the time of the crossing and he drowned while futilelessly trying to save Edward Applegate from the same in the Columbia River gorge.  He had one eye damaged years before with scissors. " [Information provided by Don Rivara; his sources include: [1] Skookum-An Oregon Pioneer Family's History and Lore, by Shannon Applegate, Beech Tree Books, William Morrow, New York, 1988]

F. MCCLELLAN .: cutoff from Fort Hall for California with the Joseph Childs company; name also seen as T. McClelland

John MCCLURE (1790-): m'd 1851 Louisa CHEHALNE; settled Clatsop Co; wife, Louisa, was native of the Chehalne tribe; John came to Oregon when in his 50s.  His birth has been listed as both 1790 and 1798.  The 1850 Clatsop county, Oregon census lists him as John McClure, 60, with an occupation of "speculator" and a worth of $30,000; John owned one of three lots that later became Astoria.  He sold his land at Astoria in 1858 to Cyrus Olney and returned to Indiana.

George Fristo MCCORKLE (1819-1891): m'd 1840 Elizabeth Brooks HOWELL; s/o Alexander and Rebecca (Fristoe) McCorkle; settled Marion Co where he farmed and raised his family.  He was active in the Democratic party and was active in the community.  He was selected as a judge of the produce at several of the county fairs.  He is buried at Howell Prairie Cemetery , Marion Co, OR. George was the father of 8 children (Temperance, Alexander, Mary A., Elizabeth F., Josephine, John H., Isabelle P., Marian A. and Albert)

Temperance MCCORKLE (1842- ): m'd 1862 David WILLS; d/o George and Elizabeth (Howell) McCorkle; Temperance was born in MO just prior to emigration.  It is believed that she died before the 1870 census, as David Wills is found living with wife Emma at that point.  He was later divorced from Emma.

William MCDANIEL (1821 - ): William McDaniel was born in Marshall Co, TN.  In 1847 he signed a petition in Clatsop Co to ban the sale of alcohol.  Around 1855 he took up a donation land claim in Marion Co.
"Mc Daniel apparently hired on as a driver for one of Lyman Cooper's wagons.  In James Nesmith's diary entry for Wednesday, October 4, 1843, he states, "Cooper had the fore axle-tree of his wagon broken off this evening by two Indian bulls charging on the team and causing them to run aground.  McDaniel, the driver, shot at one of them with a pistol, wounding him in the mouth." [Information provided by Don Rivara; his sources include: [1]  Our Proud Past, by Gail I. McCormick, self-published, p. 20,  22, [James Nesmith's Diary of 1843, extracted from the Oregon Historical Quarterly, December 1906]

Elizabeth MCGARY (1829-1904): m'd 1845 Asa Lawrence LOVEJOY; d/o James and Martha McGary of Madisonville, KY.  Elizabeth came to Oregon with her mother, Martha and brother, Garrett.  While on the trail she met Asa Lovejoy and later married him.  The Lovejoys are living at Oregon City in the 1880 census.  By 1900 they were Elizabeth was living with her daughter and son-in-law at Portland.  She died at Portland June 4, 1904

Garrett Washington MCGARY (1822-1897): m'd 1853 Catherine SPARKS; s/o James and Martha McGary. Garrett settled in Polk Co with mother his mother, Martha and sister, Elizabeth McGary.  He was the father of ten children (James H., Martha, Sarah Elizabeth, Lucretia A., Samuel H., Olive, Kate, Edward M., Isaac L. and Harrison White).  He moved to Los Angeles, CA where he died Dec 20, 1897

Martha MCGARY (c1800- ) : m'd c1820 James MCGARY; came to Oregon with son and daughter; maiden name unknown at this time

Sarah J. MCGARY  (1824- ) : m'd 1841 William T. NEWBY; Sarah almost drowned when their boat capsized on the Columbia. Sarah and her family settled near McMinnville, Yamhill Co, OR.  Sarah was the mother of (James B., Luther A., Virginia, Harrison, Olly, Emma, Martha and Rosalee).

Mr. MCGEE : cutoff from Fort Hall for California with the Joseph Childs company

*4) Napoleon McGILLIVRAY: trapper with Fremont

MCHALEY FAMILY RESEARCHER:
Amanda Jane MCHALEY
(1831- ) : m'd 1859 Hezekiah PORTER; d/o John and Sarah (Russell) McHaley;1860 is enumerated in the Marion County census, by 1870 the family is living in Baker county and by 1880 in Umatilla county.  Amanda was the mother of Lillie and Elmerine.

Andrew Jackson MCHALEY
(1839-1919): m'd Mary A. [maiden name unknown]; s/o John and Sarah (Russell) McHaley; Andrew is listed as a farmer in the 1860 Josephine Co census.  By the 1870 census he is in Wasco county where he remains through the 1900 census.  Andrew was the father of one son and three daughters (William H., twins Mattie and Minnie, Ida).

Francis Marion MCHALEY (c1841- ): s/o John and Sarah (Russell) McHaley; Francis is living in Josephine Co in 1860, with his brother Andrew but is not found in later census records.

George Washington MCHALEY
(1836-1906): m'd Mary L. JACKSON; s/o John and Sarah (Russell) McHaley.  George moved to Wasco Co in 1870 where it appears his wife died.  He then moved to Grant Co by 1880.  He served in the state legislature from Grant county in 1882 and 1883 and in special sessions of 1883 and 1884.  He accumulated 2,000 acres of land in Grant county and lived in Prairie City at the time of his death.  It appears he never remarried.  He was the father of George Volney, Rice R., Nettie E., Clara J., Inez, Rodney and Anna.  *1: MSS#543, 23pp reminiscence in collection at OHS.

Henry A. MCHALEY (1833- ): m'd 1861 Esther BULLING; s/o John and Sarah (Russell) McHaley.  Henry settled in Marion county with his parents but by 1860 is found farming in Jackson County.  By the 1870 census he is living in Wasco county next door to his brother, George.  By 1880 it appears that Henry is deceased.  His youngest children are living with his brother Andrew J. McHaley.  Henry was the father of Emily J., Delilah, Viletta A., Norvesta and Sarah E.

John MCHALEY (1784-1865): m1. 1806 (Unknown); m2. 1830 Sarah Ellen (RUSSELL) Frazier; s/o William and Catherine Michaely; John brought to Oregon his four Frazier step-children and five of his own children.  Another son was born in 1845.  The family settled near Macleay in Marion Co and then moved to the Aumsville area of Marion county.  When the Civil War broke out John was a strong sympathizer of the south so he packed bag and baggage and returned to IN to offer his services.  At the time he was of an advanced age and was turned away.  He was in Indiana in 1863 and then left for Texas.  He was not heard from again and was presumed dead.  Probate papers were filed in 1871 in Marion county.
".  In James Nesmith diary entry for Monday August 21, 1843, on the Bear River, "Upset McHaley's wagon in Bear River."  The next day he states, "Seven wagons of us left camp this morning, leaving McHaley and Applegate to lay by."  [Information provided by Don Rivara; his sources include: [1]  Our Proud Past, by Gail I. McCormick, self-published, pp 18 [James Nesmith's Diary of 1843, extracted from the Oregon Historical Quarterly, December 1906]

John MCINTIRE : cutoff from Fort Hall for California with the Joseph Childs company

D. MCKISSIE :

*3) Ciprien MENARD : s/o Pierre Menard.  Ciprien's father was at one time Lt. Governor of Illinois.  Reportedly, several members of this family were among the gentlemen members of the Stewart party.

*4) Louis MENARD :  Louis was a member of both Fremont's first and second expeditions.  He was engaged at St. Louis, MO for the second expedition and when the party later split in two for exploration he stayed with Fremont.

Eliza Lois MIDDICK (1808-1888): m'd 1827 Nehemiah MARTIN. Eliza and her husband emigrated to Oregon with 4 children, Clementine, Mary, John and Nancy.  Two of their children, Abigail Jane and Ann Eliza had died prior to the emigration. .  They settled in Yamhill Co where five more children were born to them; Jerome, Sarah Caroline, Isaiah M., Henry Clay and Flint W.

Temperance MIDKIFF (1796-1848): m'd 1811 John HOWELL; d/o Isaiah and Mary (Kimble) Midkiff.  Temperance was the first burial in Howell Prairie Cemetery, Howell Prairie, Marion Co, OR.  She was buried on the donation land claim of her husband.  Temperance was the mother of 14 children (Mary 1812, Haywood Benjamin 1814, John Jamison 1816, William Brooks 1818, Pleasant Rose 1820, Elizabeth Brooks 1822, Thomas E. 1824, Wesley 1826, George W. 1828, Sarah J. 1830, Andrew 1831, Kimble Edmond 1833, Jefferson Metcalf 1835 and Nancy 1836)

Elizabeth MILLER (1815- ): m'd 1831 Lindsay APPLEGATE; sister of Malinda (Miller) Applegate; *1: MSS#1089, bio of Elizabeth Miller by Lillian Gertrude Applegate, typescript (Dye Coll. Box 1) is in the collection at the OHS.;
"Betsy was the younger sister of Melinda Miller, who married Charles Applegate.  Betsy married Charles' younger brother Lindsay Applegate.  Betsy was born in 1816.  She was twenty-seven at the time of the 1843 crossing." [Information provided by Don Rivara, his sources included: [1] Skookum-An Oregon Pioneer Family's History and Lore, by Shannon Applegate, Beech Tree Books, William Morrow, New York, 1988]

Malinda MILLER (1812-1888): m'd 1829 Charles APPLEGATE; sister of Elizabeth Miller; mother of 16 children;
"Melinda Miller was born in 1813.  She was the older sister of Elizabeth "Betsy" [Miller] Applegate, the wife of Lindsay Applegate.  Melinda in 1829 married Charles Applegate [1806-1879], the oldest of the three Applegate brothers who were in the '43 migration.  Melinda was thirty years old at the time of the 1843 crossing. The children of Charles and Melinda in the 1843 crossing were Lucy Applegate, born 1830; Susan Applegate, born 1831; Ellen Applegate, born 1832; James Applegate, born 1834; Mary Applegate, born 1836; Lisbon Applegate, born 1837; Irene Applegate, born 1839; John Applegate, born 1842; and Albert, born 1843.  An infant had died in 1841, and there would be other children born in Oregon:  Harriet, 1845; Thomas, 1847; Jane, 1848; Fanny, 1850; George "Buck" Applegate, 1852; and Milton, 1854, sixteen children in all.  Charles built a new frame home.  The house was a duplex with two separate entries, one side for the women, the other for the men.  Charles died in 1879, and Melissa died in 1888 at the age of seventy-five.  She is buried in the Yoncalla Cemetery."  [Information provided by Don Rivara, his sources included: [1] Skookum-An Oregon Pioneer Family's History and Lore, by Shannon Applegate, Beech Tree Books, William Morrow, New York, 1988]

Andrew Jackson MILLICAN (1834-1907): s/o Elijah and Lucinda (Crisp) Millican; shown in 1850 Yamhill Co census living with parents

Edmund MILLICAN (c1812-c1895): brother of Elijah Millican; father of 12 children

Elijah MILLICAN (1804-c1887): m'd 1827 Lucinda Wilson CRISP. Elijah settled Linnton in 1843 but moved to Lafayette, Yamhill Co in 1844. He emigrated with 2 wagons he built himself and 5 yoke of oxen. Elijah went to CA temporarily in 1849.  The father of 12 children, he died at age 83yrs.

Elizabeth Hannah MILLICAN (1840-1917): m1. 1861 Robert HORTON; m2. 1867 (Unknown) MCCULLOUGH; m3. Dorsey Sydney BAKER; d/o Elijah and Lucinda (Crisp) Millican

James K. MILLICAN (1843- ): m'd Sarah (Unknown); s/o Elijah and Lucinda (Crisp) Millican

Lettice Jane MILLICAN (1830-1911 ): m1. 1845 Ransom CLARK; m2. Amos Reynolds; d/o Elijah and Lucinda (Crisp) Millican; Lettice met Ranson Clark during the 1843 emigration and was married to him in 1845.  They settled in Yamhill Co where they took up a successful farming operation.  In 1856 Ransom Clark traveled to Walla Walla in present day Washington to secure a land claim.  Mr Clark returned to Portland. but was taken sick on the way home and lived only a couple of weeks. Sixteen years before, Lettice Millican, as a girl of thirteen years, had passed through the Walla Walla valley; now she returned, the widow of Ransom Clark. At Celilo, she boarded the steamer Col. Wright, which was loaded with supplies for Lieutenant Mullah, who was in charge of the construction of the Mullen road between Fort Benton, Montana., and Walla Walla.  Upon arrival at the claim she found the log house finished and farm work progressing, Mrs. Clark returned to Portland, settled her affairs and later, with her two youngest children, one a baby girl six weeks old, left for her donation claim on the Yellowhawk to make final proof. The town of Walla Walla was just starting. The camping place for teamsters packers and immigrants was along Mill Creek, on one side of which the cantonment was built in 1856, so the town was started there by merchants, butchers and saloon-keepers. Split logs were driven into the ground, poles were laid across the top, and canvas or clapboards laid for a roof.
   There were only five donation claims in Walla Walla county. Three of these were taken by Hudson's Bay Company men, one by the American Foreign Missionary Society which included the Whitman site. The Ransom Clark claim was the fifth and was destined to become the scene of splendid endeavor and triumph by a brave young pioneer mother. Her deeds have since been commemorated in a bronze marker embedded m the fireplace of the local Y. M. C. A., also in a marker affixed to a large block of native granite brought from the hills and placed near the northwestern corner of the claim The marker bears this inscription :  "To mark the site of the Ransom Clark Donation Claim and to honor the memory of   LETTICE J. REYNOLDS 1830-1911 A pioneer of 1843 with Whitman's Train       As widow of Ransom Clark this brave woman completed in 1859 under conditions calling.for the greatest courage the claim to this land, initiated by him in1800.   She married Almos H. Reynolds in 1861 and survived him 22 years. She was the ideal pioneer wife, mother, and generous Christian citizen. [This marker was placed by the Narcissa Prentiss Chapter, Daughters Of the American Revolution, June, 1935].

Louisa Allen MILLICAN (1837-c1902): m'd c1858 DIXON, Jesse Downs; d/o Elijah and Lucinda (Crisp) Millican; settled in Yamhill Co where she is enumerated in the 1850 census with her parents and the1860, 1870 and 1880 census with her husband and children.  In 1900 she is living in Tillamook with her daughter, Jane, and her son-in-law S.M. Hayes.  She is shown as a widow at that time.

Mary Adlin MILLICAN (1832 - ): twin of Melvina

Melvina MILLICAN (1832-1916): m'd 1845 James L. HEMBREE; twin of Mary; "Before the emigration of 1843, there were so few white women in the Oregon country that most of the white men took Indian wives. White girls were so much in demand that many of the girls married at the age of 12 or 13 years.... One of my chums was married when she was 12 years old. Mother made me promise not to get married so young, so I waited till two days after my thirteenth birthday before I was married.";
"Melvina celebrated her eleventh birthday on the Oregon Trail.  She was born September 22, 1832, in Arkansas, the daughter of Elijah Milligan and Lucinda [Crisp] Milligan.  Just two years after celebrating her birthday on the trail, Melvina was married to James N. T. Hembree, on September 29, 1845, in Yamhill County, the week after her thirteenth birthday.  
      In 1914 Melvina recalled, "Two days after I turned thirteen I married.  My husband was nineteen years old.  When we exchanged vows, I was wearing a new calico dress that Mama made me, regular store-bought shoes, and even stockings.  We took a donation land claim of 640 acres and built a cabin which we moved into at once.  Within the next few days my husband made a bedstead out of fir poles, which he peeled and fastened to the wall.  He pegged them together for we had no nails.  On this bed we laid dried ferns for our mattress.  Our table was a tree split down the middle, and we had two stools.  Pegs were driven into the walls for hats, coats, and clothes. My only dishes were a big iron kettle, a small iron pot, and an iron skillet.  I had to stoop over the mud fireplace in order to cook.  I baked bread in the iron skillet, pot-roasted our meat in the iron pot, baked potatoes in the ashes, and browned wheat or oats for our coffee.  My husband was a great hand to hunt.  He usually turned out about daybreak and would be gone only an hour or two, returning with deer, grouse, rabbit, or the like.  We always had game hanging in the tree near the kitchen door.  The first baby came along.  Others followed.  I took care of the babies, cooked, washed clothes, made soap and candles, knitted and darned and seved and did all the other things that had to be done.  For entertainment we used to go to preachings at the neighboring houses or to barn-raisings or house-warmings.  The kids are grown and we have grandchildren, great grandchildren, and even a few great great.  Next year Pa and me will celebrate seven decades of being together, and that's mighty good."
      The Hembrees lived for many years in Lafayette, Oregon.  They were married seventy years when Melvina died at the age of eighty-three on March 17, 1916, in Lafayette, a longer marriage than any other pioneer of 1843.  In 1910 Melvina and James, his brother Waymon and Waymon's wife Nancy Beagle Hembee, and Charlotte Matheny Kirkwood posed for a photograph and news article as the last five survivors of the 1843 migration.  There were several others alive then, but it made a good story anyway."  [Information provided by Don Rivara; his sources include: [1] Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, on-line Family Search; [2]  "Newlyweds," p.8, Pioneers Vol. 11, by Rick Steber, Bonanza Publishing, Prineville, OR, 1993.]

William Mansil MILLICAN (1836- ): s/o Elijah and Lucinda (Crisp) Millican

MILLS FAMILY RESEARCHER:
Charity Mariah MILLS
(1830-1912): m'd 1848 William PHILLIPS, d/o Isaac and Rachel (Bales) Mills; Charity and William settled in Clackamas county and remained there until their deaths.  In the 1900 Clackamas county census Charity is shown as the mother of 9 children with 5 still living, however, the various census records list the following 10 children (Charles, Albert, James/Alvis, John F., Mary E., Emma J., Anna, Florence, Hattie, Clyde)

Isaac MILLS (1786-c1871): m'd 1811 Rachel BALES; s/o Aaron and Charity (Mendenhall) Mills; was born to Quaker parents in NC; starting c1806 family moved back to TN, then to IN and back to TN; by 1838 living in Arkansas; 1843 to OR where he settled in Tualatin area, Washington Co, OR (father of 13 children: Priscilla (1812); Mary Ann (1813); John Bales (1815); Amanda Narcissa (1816); Henry (1818); Mary (1820); Owen (1821); Laura Jane (1824): William A. (1826); Isaac Clarkson (1830); Charity Mariah (1830); Rachel Emily (1832); Julia Ann (1834);  it appears that some of the older children remained in Arkansas and did not emigrate to OR.
"Charlotte Matheny Kirkwood states in her memoir, "Somewhere near the crossing of the North Platte, we camped at a place called Soap Springs.  It was a boggy place:  old Mr. Mills stepped into a sinkhole and, as he said, went in up to his hat band."  [Information provided by Don Rivara; his sources include: [1] Into the Eye of the Setting Sun, pp. 22-23, by Charlotte [Matheny] Kirkwood, Pub. by Hewitt-Matheny-Cooper Family Assoc.]   

Isaac Clarkson MILLS (1843- ): s/o John and Margaret (Hurst) Mills

John Beales MILLS (1815-1907): m'd Margaret HURST; s/o Isaac and Rachel (Bales) Mills; enumerated in 1845 Tuality Census, later Washington Co.   John is shown in the 1850 Clackamas county census, the 1860 Douglas county census, and the 1870 Washington county census.  He died in Yakima, WA.  John was the father of (Rebecca J., William A., Isaac C., Jasper, Mary A., Martha S., John F., Virginia, Margaret, and J.N.)

Julia Ann MILLS (1834-c1866): m'd Jesse CORNELIUS; d/o Isaac and Rachel (Bales) Mills; Julia is not enumerated in the 1870 census and her husband is showed remarried with a 1 year old son.  Julia was the mother of (John W., Thomas E., Rachel A., Eliza F.,and Julia A.)

Laura "Jane" MILLS (1824- ): m'd 1844 Richard ARTHUR; d/o Isaac and Rachel (Bales) Mills; Laura and Richard are shown in the 1860 and Washington Co, OR census. Richard died in 1869 and Laura is head of household in the 1870 Washington county census records.  At that time she was the mother of (Millie, William, Robert, John, Julia A., Margaret, Samuel, Minerva, Elizabeth and Rachel )

Mary Jane "Polly" MILLS (1820-1849): m'd 1840 William WILSON; d/o Isaac and Rachel (Bales) Mills; Mary Jane died January 1849 leaving 5 children.  Mary was mother of (Caroline, John R., Rachel, Isaac C., Charity M.)

Owen MILLS (1821- ): m1. 1847 Priscilla BLAIR; m2. 1888 Hannah S. BRAND; s/o Isaac and Rachel (Bales) Mills; Owen is  shown in the 1860 Tulare county, CA census with his wife and the following children (James, William, Stephen, Charles).  By 1880 Owen is living with his niece in Washington county and working as a hired hand on their farm.  There is no mention of his family. He remarried in 1888.

Rachel "Emily" MILLS (1832- ): m'd 1848 Enos Thomas MENDENHALL; d/o Isaac and Rachel (Bales) Mills; Emily is shown with her family in the 1860 Place county, CA census.  Enos is listed as a lumberman with a worth of $10,000. In 1870 and 1880 Enos is listed in the San Diego county census.  His son, George is residing with him.  No listing for Emily in 1870 but she appears in the 1880 Washington county census living with her niece.  Her daughter, Lydia is living with her at that time.  Emily was the mother of (Elivra Ellen, George Washington, Hannah Jane, Sylvester Jacob, Pamela Ann, Emily Sylvinia, Thomas Dick, Lyal Albert, Lydia Asenath).  In the 1900 San Diego county census, Enos Mendenhall is enumerated as a widow and two of his sons, George and Thomas D. are living with him.

Rebecca J. MILLS (1838- ): d/o John and Margaret (Hurst) Mills

William A. MILLS (1826- ): m1. 1848 Rachel Way (JOY) Fisher; m2. Mary E. Capps; s/o Isaac and Rachel (Bales) Mills; William married the widow of John Fisher who died on the trail in 1847 and settled in Washington Co.  Rachel died c1868 and William remarried.  William and Rachel were the parents of (Rachel (d. 1851), Julia A., John M., Mary E., Laura A., Elva J., Albert W.)

William A. MILLS (1841- ): s/o John and Margaret (Hurst) Mills

Gilbert MONDEN (c1822-bef 1870): m'd Elizabeth J. DEAN; Gilbert is enumerated in several sources as a pioneer of 1843; in 1847 he is shown in a supreme court decision Gilbert Munden vs James McGinnis; in 1850 Gilbert "Munden" is shown residing in Yamhill county where he signs a resolution defending Joseph Lane; by 1860 he is living in Jackson Co with his wife and children (Zachariah, Sarah J., J.M., and Margaret).  Gilbert is not found in the 1870 census but Jack Monden is shown in Marion County as a laborer.  Since Zachariah Monden is shown as being born c1851 in MO it is possible that the family came later or that Gilbert went back east and returned again in a later emigration.

*4) Louis MONTREUIL (c1795- ): member of Fremont's second expedition; believed to be the Louis Montreuil shown in the 1850 Jefferson Co, LA census

Jackson MOORE: turned south at the Platte River to go to Taos, then a town of the Mexican province of New Mexico

Philip P. MULKEY: family legend says he was originally with Fremont in 1839 and came again in 1843; reportedly was a wagon scout during several of the emigration years; led a party of family members to OR in 1847; (note: in the 1843 roster of the Fremont party I did not find any mention of Philip Mulkey so his participation in the 1843 emigration is in question)

John Jacob MYERS: was a first lieutenant under Fremont.  John Jacob MYERS

NAYLOR FAMILY RESEARCHER:
Thomas Chapman NAYLOR (c1844-1904): m1. m2. Catherine ALEXANDER; s/o Thomas and Sarah (Storey) Naylor; father of 6 children (Archie, Hardenia C., John H., Margaret Ella, Harvey A. and Irvine); settled in Washington County, OR; apparently went back east and fought in the Civil War;  he met and married his wife in PA where two of his children were born before he returned to OR c1875

Thomas George NAYLOR
(1814-1872): m1. 1840 Sarah STOREY; m2. Catherine STOREY; s/o Thomas Chapman and Jane P. (Walton) Naylor; settled in Washington Co; first wife died on claim Feb 2, 1852 leaving 6 children (Thomas C., Sarah Catherine, Hardenia P., James Henry, Margaret A. and John); children by second wife are (Myra, George, Charles, Edward, Milton, Cora, Hiram, Edith)

(Unknown) NAYLOR ( -1843): "Edward Lenox states in his recollections, "…G. T. Naler's [sic] little boy who also fell over the front end of the wagon during our journey.  In his case the great wheels rolled over the child's head, crushing it to pieces." [Information provided by Don Rivara; his sources include:[1] p.64, Overland to Oregon, by Edward Lenox, written 1904, republished by Ye Galleon Press, Fairfield, Washington]

*4) Samuel NEAL: member of Fremont's second expedition; while camped at Sutter's Fort  "March 22, Neal, the blacksmith (an excellent workman, and an unmarried man, who had done his duty faithfully and had been of very great service to me) desired to remain, as strong inducements were offered here to mechanics.  Although at considerable inconvenience to myself his good conduct induced me to comply with his request; and I obtained for him, from Captain Sutter, a present compensation of two dollars and a half per diem, with a promise that it should be increased to five if he proved as good a workman as had been represented."

Elizabeth NELSON (c1842 - ): d/o John B. and Clarissa Nelson; was somehow left behind after a stop on the trail, the frantic parents returned to find the sleeping infant

Jasper NELSON (1841- ): m'd c1884 Ada A. (maiden name unknown); s/o John B. and Clarissa Nelson; was living at home through the 1870 census; living next door to parents in 1880 Yakima Co, WA census

John B. NELSON (1817-1893): m'd 1839 Clara Clarissa JONES; his wagon carried tools of his blacksmith trade, and the root of a hop vine to make yeast for bread; after reaching Oregon City he melted the old wagon wheels and made plows; settled on DLC in Marion County for a while; by 1860 was living in WA; died in Yakima Co, WA where he is buried with his wife in the Nelson Cemetery

Margaret Ann NELSON (1839-aft 1910):  m'd 1856 James H. FRESH; d/o John B. and Clarissa Nelson; was the mother of 4 children; was a widow in 1900 Multnomah Co, OR census and 1910 Yakima Co, WA census; dressmaker

Thomas NELSON (1843 - ): m'd c1880 Emma F. MABRY; s/o John B. and Clarissa Nelson, born Christmas Day at The Dalles in the covered wagon; settled in Yakima Co, WA; was still living at home through the 1870 census; by 1880 was married and living in the area

James Willis NESMITH (1820-1885): m'd 1846 Pauline GOFF; s/o William and Harriet (Willis) Nesmith; was of Scotch-English descent; James Nesmith, without family ties, looked upon the emigration of 1843 as an "adventure" and a chance for a new life; he was a volunteer in the Cayuse Indian War, Rogue Indian War and Yakima Indian War; US Senator; settled at Derry, Polk Co where he had a large farm

NEWBY FAMILY RESEARCHER:
William Thompson NEWBY
(1821-1884): m'd 1841 MCGARY, Sarah; 1839 to MO; orphaned at six; he and wife almost drowned when their boat capsized on the Columbia; founded the town of McMinnville, Yamhill Co in 1855; 1853 built a grist mill and in 1854, a store; State Senator in 1870;  buried in the Masonic Cemetery, near McMinnville, OR (father of eight children: James Blakley (1846-1872); Luther Augustus (1847-1897); Mrs. Virginia Kinney Watson Blackburn (1848-1928); Harrison Caldwell (1850-1926); Mrs. Olley Lemon (1851-1932); Mrs. Emma Ladd (1855-1896); Mrs. Martha Ann Graves Bean (1861-1936) and Mrs. Rosa Lee Clark (1865-1933)

Noah NEWMAN: listed as an emigrant of 1843; it is believed he may have been in party that returned east

*4) Mr. NICOLLET: member of both Fremont's first and second expeditions

Thomas A. O'BRIEN: listed on scout list for 1843.  No further information.

OBRYANT FAMILY RESEARCHER:
Hugh Donaldson O'BRYANT
(1815-aft 1880): m'd c1853 Matilda Doddridge Walter; b. GA; 1850 living in Portland, OR; was a carpenter who build Portland's first public library in 1850; elected as Portland's first mayor in 1851by receiving 104 of the 222 votes cast;  O'Bryant Square on the corner of Park and Washington St. in Portland is named in his honor; father of (Rachel, Martha, Duncan, Walter, Wilson, Sherman, Sarah)

Humphrey P. O'BRYANT (1829-aft 1880): m1.c1857 (unknown);  m2. c1862 Julia (Indian); b. GA; traveled to CA mines with Eberman, Wood, Thompson and Alexander; went into town with Eberman brothers and returned to find remainder of camp had been massacred by indians; found in the 1850 Oregon census living with Springer family; by 1860 is living in King Co, WA with a 1 year old daughter and no wife; 1870 is living in Whatcom Co, WA; father of children (Lydia, James, Mary, Ella, Lilla, Nellie)

Abraham Christian OLINGER (1813-1872): m'd 1834 Rachel STOUT; settled in the Waldo Hills area of Marion Co where he farmed; father of  twelve children including: (Amanda, Nancy, Sarah A., Martha, Ephraim, Oroseltha, Lucretia, Alice, Silas A. and John);  buried in Olinger Cemetery, Marion Co, OR

Amanda C. OLINGER (1837-1916): m'd Dr. Andrew Willson PATTERSON; d/o Abraham and Rachel (Stout) Olinger; after marriage settled at Eugene where her husband was a physician; Amanda was the mother of 8 children (Augusta, Anna, Ida, Clyde L., Carl V.L., Harriet, and 2 children who died young); after the death of her husband she ran a rooming house in Eugene

Nancy Jane OLINGER (1840-1890): m'd 1855 Samuel Clinton Buster; d/o Abraham and Rachel (Stout) Olinger; buried Stipp Cemetery, Marion Co, OR; family settled in Marion County; Nancy was the mother of Francis, Clarence and Claud M.

Sarah A. OLINGER (1843 - ): m'd Ephraim Henness; d/o Abraham and Rachel (Stout) Olinger; born on trail; no information is found on Sarah after the death of her father in 1872.  At that time she was still single.  

OLNEY FAMILY RESEARCHER:
Nathan Olney
(1824-1866): m'd Annette HALLICOLA; originally was member of 1843 emigration, returned to states in 1844 and joined emigration of 1845; settled at The Dalles and was prominent in it's early settlement; was storekeeper at the Dalles, Marshall of Dalles City and sheriff of Wasco Co; served as Indian Agent, guide and interpreter during Yakima Indian War; m'd daughter of Chief Chalalee of the Wasco tribe by tribal custom; m'd widow of James Sinclair who he divorced after only a month and remarried his indian wife in 1859 by Justice of the Peace; died Sep 28, 1866 in Ahtanum, WA

Bennett ONEIL:
"In James Nesmith's diary entry for Monday, July 3, 1843, "..Two men arrived in our camp from Applegates company…They bring us intelligence of one of their company being lost by the name of Bennett O'Neil.  He had been out three days.  They have made a vigilant search, which proved unsuccessful…" [Information provided by Don Rivara; his sources include: [1]  Our Proud Past, by Gail I. McCormick, self-published, pp 14, [James Nesmith's Diary of 1843, extracted from the Oregon Historical Quarterly, December 1906]

Neil OSBORN: listed on scout list for 1843

Edwin Walter OTEY (1816-1887): m'd 1846 Martha Jane Bunton; s/o John Hopkins and Elizabeth (Buford) Otey; born  Bedford Co, VA; settled in Yamhill Co, was living in Clackamas Co during 1850 census and by 1857 was residing in Douglas Co; father of 11 children (Eliza, James, Edward, Elijah, Julia, William, Lilly, Monroe, Lucy, George); buried in Otey Cemetery, listed interchangeably as Edward and Edwin

Morris B. OTEY  (1818- ): b. VA; is shown on 1847 Yamhill Co tax rolls and 18 Aug 1847 had land claim in what is now Washington Co; went to California prior to 1850 where he worked for Joseph B. Childs on his farm;  appears that he never married.  Does not appear in the 1880 census records;  probably brother of Edwin W. Otey listed above

OWENS FAMILY RESEARCHER:

Dr. Bethenia Angeline OWENS (1840-1926): m1. 1854 HILL, Lagrande; m2. 1884 Col. John Adair; d/o Thomas and Sarah (Damron) Owens; crossed plains with parents when 3yrs old;  m1. 04 May 1854; was a small woman, reaching only 5'4" in height; divorced her husband for cruelty leaving herself with small son to support; moved home and did washing; studied to get an education; after a year taught school, did sewing, took care of boarding house for room and board; started a millinery shop at Roseburg to get money to send son to medical school; 1870 went to San Francisco to enter her son in the U of CA; she trained to be a nurse; later went to Philadelphia to study to be a doctor; opened an office in Portland; her son, George, entered the medical dept of Willamette University at age 19 and graduated two  years later; later sold her property and went to Ann  Arbor, Mich to study at medical school at U of Mich; traveled to lectures all over world, visiting all the leading hospitals; returned to Portland office; on July 24, 1884 m'd Colonel Adair, a childhood acquaintance; Bethenia had  one child in 1887 by Col. Adair but it died within three days of the birth; after her retirement from medical practice she devoted her energy to pushing for laws to protect the youth of  OR; worked for temperance, woman suffrage, sterilization of criminal insane and preservation of historical records of the pioneers; moved to Warrenton with second husband; died 1926 at the age of 86 in Astoria and is buried in Oceanview Cemetery, Warrenton, OR 

Diana Maria OWENS (1838-1874): m'd 1851 John Hobson; d/o Thomas and Sarah (Damron) Owens; settled in Clatsop county where she died in 1874 in childbirth; mother of  (Frank P., Mary Ada, Harry B., Maud E., infant ); buried in Pioneer Cemetery, Clatsop Co, OR

James W. Fleming OWENS  (1841- ): m'd 1864 Nancy L. Stevens; s/o Thomas and Sarah (Damron) Owens; settled in Roseburg area where he was a farmer and a warehouseman

Thomas A. OWENS (1808-1873): m'd 1833 Sarah Damron; settled in Clatsop Co; of Welsh descent, was tall and slender; arrived in OR with a half dollar and 10 years later had over $20,000 in bank; 1848 built a schooner with neighbors that they stocked with produce and sailed to San Francisco where they sold all the cargo; father of   (Bethenia Angelina, Diana Maria, James Flemming, Josiah B.,  Jane, Sarah, Solomon Pierce, Eliza Mary, Melissa A., Lydia, Luracy); went to CA for his health where he died at Piety Hill, Trinity Co, CA

PAINE: See Payne  This name seems to be shown as Paine in the earlier records and as Payne later on.

Pierre (Peter) PAPIN: on some lists as 1843 emigrant but actually arrived at Ft. Vancouver in 1838; see 1838 list for additional information

Cynthia Ann PARKER (1814-1881): m'd 1831 Jesse APPLEGATE; d/o Jeremiah and Sally (Yount) Parker; "Cynthia Parker was born in 1813 in Kentucky, the daughter of Jeremiah Parker, a flatboatman on the Mississippi River, and Sally Ann [Youhnt] Parker, of Dutch descent.  There were five children, four boys and a girl.  Sally died in 1824, so Jeremiah sent Cynthia, age eleven, and her youngest brother, William, five, to live with their uncle, John Yount, in Missouri.  On March 13, 1831, she married Jesse Applegate, when she was seventeen and he, nineteen.  They had twelve children. Six crossed the trail to Oregon in 1843: Rozelle Applegate, born 1832; Edward Bates Applegate, born 1833; Alexander McClellan Applegate, born 1838; Robert Shortess Applegate, born 1839; William Henry Harrison Applegate, born 1841; and Gertrude Applegate, born 1841.  Born after arriving in Oregon were Daniel Webster Applegate, 1845-1896; Sallie Applegate, 1848-1912; Peter Skeen Ogden Applegate, 1851-1916; Ellen Applegate; and Flora Applegate. Another child, Milburn, 1836-1839, died before the journey."[information provided by Don Rivara. In addition to the present website his Sources included: [1] Skookum-An Oregon Pioneer Family's History and Lore, by Shannon Applegate, Beech Tree Books, William Morrow, New York, 1988]

Jesse PARKER:

William Glen PARKER (1822-1890): m'd Lucinda TETHEROW; in boat that capsized in the rapids near The Dalles but was able to swim to safety; brother-in-law of Jesse Applegate; settled in southern Oregon;
"Born April 22, 1819, in Kentucky, William was the younger brother of Cynthia [Parker] Applegate, wife of Jesse Applegate.  Their father was Jeremiah Parker, a flatboatman on the Mississippi River.  Their mother was Sally Ann Yount, of Dutch extraction.  Sally died when William, the youngest, was five.  His father took the oldest three boys and sent William and Cynthia to live with their uncle, John Yount, in Missouri.  Cynthia married Jesse Applegate in 1831, when William was not yet twelve.  At the time of the 1843 crossing, William, age twenty-four, was not yet married.  He was in the Applegate boat that capsized sending three of the Applegate party to their deaths. An able swimmer, William was able to save himself.  With the Applegates he spent the winter of 1843-1844 in the abandoned Methodist Mission buildings twelve miles north of Salem.  In the spring he moved to the Salt Creek area of Polk County.   On January 25, 1847, William married Lucinda Tetherow, the seventeen-year-old daughter of Solomon Tetherow and Ibba [Baker] Tetherow, immigrants of 1845. William did not settle on a land claim until 1849, after an unproductive period at the California gold fields. The land he and Lucinda selected was on the Luckiamute River near the land claim of  the Tetherows.  In 1860 he sold his land in Polk County and moved to Petaluma, Sonoma County, California, where he owned a farm. The founder of the nearby town of Yountville was probably a kinsman. From there the Parkers moved to Clear Lake in Modoc County, California, and farmed near the Oregon border.  Selling out there, the Parkers moved to the area between Klamath Falls and Ashland, Oregon, where they established Parker Station, a stage stop between  the two towns, in 1875. William died from pneumonia on November 2, 1890, and was buried in the Ashland Cemetery. The Parkers had eight children:  Sisney, 1848; Solomon, 1850, who died in infancy; Jesse, 1854; Sumner Austin, 1860; Atlanta, 1864; Cynthia, 1868; Josephine, and Samuel." [Information provided by Don Rivara; his sources included [1] pp. 112-113 Polk County Pioneers, Study of the Inhabitants Listed in the 1850 Federal Census of Polk County, Oregon, by Shirley H. O'Neil, 2002, self-published.] 

Joseph R. PATTERSON (1822-aft 1900): m1. 1845 Sarah L. (Keizur) Corzine; m2. c1854 Mary Jane Sherrill.  Joseph was born in Delaware and upon arrival in the Oregon Territory secured a Donation Land Claim in Marion county.  His first wife died in 1850 leaving 2 children (Mary A. Corzine, age 9, by her first husband and Sarah Patterson).  By the 1860 census Joseph has remarried and is living in Siskiyou County, California where he remains through the 1900 census.  In 1900 he is living with his son Harry and is listed as a widower.  Joseph was the father of  Sarah (1849), Margaret E. (c1855), William A. (c1857), Harry H. (1861), Etta D. (1865).  "I was riding Patterson's young skittish horse by his request; nobody could manage him.  I got one load on, and in getting on another I made a blunder, the horse jumped and broke the girth.  He was held with the end of a long rope.  He kept jumping till he got loose, then went of with rope and bridle for good and always.  Hess carried my saddle to camp, so I was out nothing but rope and bridle.  The next day I wanted to go back with the boys to look for him but the company would not agree...We always thought if I had gone I would have got the horse.  He was a noble horse." [Recollections of An Oregon Pioneer of 1843 by Samuel Penter (OHSQ Vol 7 p55-61)]  

Claiborne PAYNE (1796-1843): m'd Miriam Sumners.  Claiborne Paine was born 1796 Crawford Co, Ark; he became ill with what was called "inflammation of the bowels" and died August 4 on the Sweetwater leaving a wife and four children (also seen spelled as PAINE);
"In James Nesmith's diary entry for Monday, July 31, 1843, "Came up to Martin's company about 1:00 and found some very sick men in the company.  Among the rest were Mr. Payne and Stevenson.  The latter seemed very dangerous of fever and flighty, uttering incoherent sentences.  His situation excited my sympathy, to see a fine stout young man reduced to a wreck by disease.  I took a parting look, never expecting to behold him again."      On Friday, August 4, 1843, Nesmith states, "Mr. Payne, a man in Martin's company, died this morning at 3:00 o'clock.  He suffered severely, being unwell since we left Fort Laramie.  Died of inflammation of the bowels, leaving a wife and four small children.  He was decently interred on a rise of ground at the left of the road." Charlotte [Matheny] Kirkwood, in her memoirs, states, "Father had said that we might need some extra planks on the way, so our wagon boxes were all made with false bottoms. I did not know what he had in mind, what use he expected to make of them, but one morning while we were camped on the Sweetwater, I remember seeing him unload one of our wagons and lift out several of the long boards. He was not his usual merry self, and I learned that Mr. Paine had died during the night.  The boards were to be used for a coffin….

Jasper PAYNE (1842-1916): s/o Claiborne and Miriam Payne; born 1842 Crawford Co, Ark and died 16 Feb 1916 McMinnville, Yamhill Co, OR; was listed as a laborer in the various census records.

Martin V. PAYNE (1838-1898): m'd 1858 DRURY, Melissa Ellen; s/o Claiborne and Miriam Payne; born 14 Sep 1838 Crawford Co, Ark and died 02 Dec 1898 Portland, Multnomah Co, OR; buried in Lone Fir Cemetery, Portland, Multnomah Co, OR; was listed as a physician in the census records.  Settled in Yamhill County before moving to Portland.  Last ten years of his life he was in poor health.

Melissa PAYNE (c1843- ): d/o Clairborne and Miriam Payne; born Crawford Co, Ark

Newton PAYNE (c1841-c1844): s/o Clairborne and Miriam Payne
"Newton Payne, the son of Claiborn and Miriam Payne, was born about 1840 and died about 1844. He was a twin to Jasper Payne. He was buried on the Daniel Matheny Donation Land Claim while his widowed mother was living there with her children."  [Information provided by Don Rivara]

Sarah PAYNE (1809-1854): m'd 1825 Joel Jordon HEMBREE
" Sarah Paine was born March 2, 1809, in Tennessee.  She was sixteen when she married twenty-one year old Joel Jordon Hembree, on October 20, 1825, in McMinnville, Warren County, Tennessee. Sarah was thirty-four when she crossed the plains with her husband and children: James N. Thomas Hembree, 17; Waymon Clark Hembree, 14; Albert T. Hembree, 10; Isham John Hembree, 8; Joel Hembree, 6; Houston Hembree, 4; Nancy Jane Hembree, born July 26, 1843, on the Oregon Trail.  Sarah was almost nine months pregnant when young Joel was killed on the trail on July 17, when he was run over by a wagon. It was the second child the Hembrees had lost that year.  In February, before leaving their home in Carthage, Jasper County, Missouri, they had lost their two year old daughter Sarah Hembree. In Oregon the Hembrees settled in Yamhill County, where the Hembree brothers and their wives named the village they started McMinnville, after their home town in Tennessee. The Hembrees had other children in Oregon:  George A. Hembree, April 2, 1846-July 10, 1861; and Martha Ann Hembree, May 14, 1848.  Sarah died on March 15, 1854, at the age of forty-five.  Joel survived her by fourteen years." [Information provided by Don Rivara]

Harriet PEARSON: See Harriet Elizabeth Pierson

PENNINGTON FAMILY RESEARCHER:
John Barton PENNINGTON (1812-1910): m1. 1841 Sarah Elizabeth HEMBREE; m2. c1854 Mrs. Elizabeth SPORTSMAN; m3. c1875 Mrs. Margaret J. FISHER; s/o J.B. and Mary (Bennett) Pennington; settled at Linnton for the winter and then moved to Yamhill County. John died in Fresno, CA in Oct 1910 when he fell from a wagon and broke his neck.

Martha Matilda PENNINGTON (1842-1929): m'd 1858 Francis Marion TUSTIN; d/o John and Sarah (Hembree) Pennington; mother of 11 children (George Samuel, N. Austin, Edwin F., Annie Agnes, Alaric N., Ella A., John F., Charles C., Martha Frances, Blanche and Freddie C.)

Mary Jane PENNINGTON (1843-1899): m'd 1861 John CRIMMINS; born July/Aug 6 on the trail; d/o John and Sarah (Hembree) Pennington; mother of 10 children (Stephen A., John C., Mary Ellen, Charles Edwin, Nora M., Walter L., Catherine A., George W., Clarence W. and Lester A. Crimmins)

Samuel PENTER (1814-1908): m1. 1837 Matilda Caroline KEIZUR (div 1872); m2. 1872 Rebecca (MORLEY) JACOBS (widow of Abram Okey Jacobs); settled in Marion County;  "....In 1814  I was born on Reeds Creek in Blount County, East Tennessee.  I knew but little of Tennessee.  In 1820 we moved to Arkansas........In 1836 I was married to M. C. Keizur.  In the fall of 1842 I moved to Missouri to get ready to emigrate to Oregon.  Wintered in Bates County, went early in the spring to Fisher's Mill.  There we laid in our supplies for the trip.  We started the 20th of May.  I started with two horses and a small wagon and one cow that gave us milk all the way...." Recollections of An Oregon Pioneer of 1843 OHSQ 1906 p.56-61

Samuel Monroe PENTER (1843 - ): s/o Samuel and Matilda (Keizur) Penter; is enumerated in 1850 and 1860 Marion County census.  Shown in 1865 listing and then not found in records after that point.

Thomas H. PENTER (1839-1922): m'd Sarah A. (Unknown); s/o Samuel and Matilda (Keizur) Penter; lived in Marion County through 1880 census; estate was settled in Tillamook Co, OR

*4) Alexis PERA: member of Fremont's second expedition; turned back for home on September 22

*4) Francois PERA: member of Fremont's second expedition

Hubert PETIT (1822-1892): m'd 1849 Emerance GAGNON (div 1857); s/o Amable and Marianne (Beaudry) Petit; spent most of life in Marion County.  It is possible that he may actually be an emigrant of 1844.  He first shows up in the records in the 1845 Champoeg Territorial Census.  Father of  three known children (Adelaide, Amable 1853-1854 and Josephine)

Francis William PETTYGROVE (1812-1887): m'd 1842 Sarah ROLAND; s/o Thomas and Mary (McCurdy) Pettygrove; left NY for the Sandwich Islands in 1842, rested there 6 months and arrived  19 May 1843 from the Sandwich Islands on the bark "Fama"; one week after arrival he set up a store at Oregon City in partnership with his brother-in-law, Philip Foster; 1844 built grainary and warehouse at Champoeg; was merchant at Oregon City and one of the founders of Portland; sold interest in Portland claim in 1848; 1852 sailed up into what is now Washington and founded Port Townsend.  He died there in 1887.

Mary Charlotte PETTYGROVE (1810-1880): m'd 1834 Philip FOSTER; d/o Thomas and Mary (McCurdy) Pettygrove; arrived with her husband 19 May 1843 from the Sandwich Islands on the bark "Fama"; with five of their nine children the family settled at Oregon City until 1847 when Philip puchased a claim at Eagle Creek where her and her husband operated a store at Eagle Creek that served the emigrants;  Mary Charlotte provided the Oregon Territory with starts of lilac, apple and pear trees she brought from Maine; the farm is a national historic monument open to the public in the summer. Philip Foster Farm

Charles E. PICKETT (- ): Pickett was a Clackamas County Judge in 1845; was appointed Indian Agent for Oregon by President Polk but he never actively served in the position; he was not generally acceptable to the settlers; he preferred to sojourn in the Sandwich Islands from where he moved to CA; there he advised Californians traveling to OR to kill Indians wherever and whenever found.; 1848 had a store at Fort Sutter, during an altercation with Isaac Alderman he shot and killed him; he was tried and acquitted on self defense

Harriet Elizabeth PIERSON (1818-1883): m'd 1833 Jacob HAWN; d/o John and Thankful (Wilcox) Pierson; born in Newark, New Jersey and married in Buffalo, New York; emigrated with husband and children; settled in Yamhill Co with her family until the death of her husband in 1860; by 1870 she was head of household in Wasco Co; Harriet died at The Dalles in April 1883.  

Robert  H. POE ( -1846):  died in Washington county in 1846

*4) James POWER: member of Fremont's second expedition

*4) Hiram POWERS: member of Fremont's second expedition under Thomas Fitzpatrick; was discharged at Ft. Hall

*4) Charles PREUSS: member of Fremont's second expedition; was assistant in charge of the scientific equipment; when party later split into two partys for exploration he stayed with Fremont

Dr. Frederic PRIGG ( -1849):  mentioned by John Boardman in his diary " a man named Prigg attempted to ride a mule down to the water. The saddle slipped over the mules head and down the mountain at a furious rate rolled poor Prigg"; was the only physician at Oregon City; appointed secretary of the Provisonal Government.  Disappeared in Oct 1849 and was thought to have drowned due to the influence of alcohol.  His body was found some 6 months later in the Willamette River but due to wounds in his back it appeared he had been murdered.

*4) Raphael PROUE: member of Fremont's second expedition; also member of Fremon't first expedition; engaged at St. Louis, MO;  when party later split into two partys for exploration he stayed with Fremont

*3) John RADFORD: cousin of Kennerly; was among the members of the gentlemen traveling with Stewart's hunting expedition; returned to St. Louis with trappers the party met on the Platte

James RAMAGE (c1790-1851): m'd Sarah (Unknown); settled Yamhill County where he farmed and was active in local affairs; one newspaper article mentioned that he was growing peaches 9 1/2" in diameter.

Sarah RAMAGE ( -1863): m'd James RAMAGE; settled Yamhill Co where she died in 1863.

Rev. Thomas Manley RAMSDELL: mentioned in some references as emigrant of 1843 but actually came in 1844.  See 1844 list.

Pierson Barton READING (1816-1868): a party left Platte City, MO May 5th consisting of  William Martin, William Sheldon, M.P. Dougherty, Lindsay Tharp and Pierson Reading and arrived at Fitzhugh Mill, a place of rendezvous for those wishing to go to Oregon; cutoff from Fort Hall for California with the Joseph Childs company; was in charge of Sutters Fort in 1844 while Sutter was away; suffered from a severe bout of mountain fever, was bled by Dr. Whitman; Major in Fremont's California Battalion; later settled in Shasta Co, CA where he died and is buried; Journal edited by Philip B. Bekeart and published in Quarterly of the Society of California Pioneers Vol 6 [1930] p.148-260

John RECORD:  see John RICKARD

Jacob T. REED (1815- ): m'd 1844 Martha "Patsy" WILLIAMS; initially settled in Washington County where he was growing wheat near Wapato Lake.  Appears he moved to CA late 1859 or early 1860

Sarah Jane REED (1823-1913): m'd 1841 Almoran HILL; d/o Joseph and Hannah (Clemens) Reed; *1: MSS#1508, 27pp reminiscence from diary, handscript, "Our Trip to Oregon"; lost her first child on trail and a second child was born on the trail near Grande Ronde 

Thomas D. REEVES (1814-1886): m'd 1846 Nancy LLOYD; s/o John and Mary Reeves; settled Benton Co; wife died in 1862 and in 1880 census he is found living with his daughter Nancy E. Barclay; 1885 he was committed to Oregon State Hospital at Salem where he died in 1886; buried Reeves Cemetery, Benton Co, OR

George W. RICE ( -1849):  the estate for George W. Rice was filed in 1849 in Clackamas county.  In the 1850 census a George W. Rice, age 3, is living with the Martin and Anna Angle family.  

Alonzo Linn RICHARDSON (1841-1915): m'd 1871 Mrs. Caroline SMITH Yarrington; s/o Daniel and Dorcus (Daugherty) Richardson; father died at Ft. Hall during emigration; Alonzo lived at Oregon City with his mother until after 1860 census; 1870 Alonzo is living in ID where he was listed as a clerk in the Supreme Court up until his death

Amos RICHARDSON (1843- ):

Benjamin Clayton RICHARDSON (1843-1920): m'd 1869 Mary Violet DAVIS; s/o John and Britana (Hinton) Richardson; attended public schools of southern Oregon near Ashland; early manhood went to the Cariboo mines in British Columbia where he spent one year and then went to CA in 1864; next moved to Boise basin where he mined until spring of 1868 when he moved to Baker county, Oregon where he continued to mine; 1883 resided in Vale, Oregon where he was a farmer and stock raiser; went into politics in 1904 and was elected county judge of Malheur county for three consecutive terms; democrat; father of four sons including James M. (1870) and Benjamin M., (1875)

Daniel RICHARDSON (1806-1843): m'd 1838 Dorcus DAUGHERTY; s/o Daniel and Nancy (Townsend) Richardson; died on August 31 at Fort Hall leaving a wife and two children; "At Fort Hall James Nesmith's party stayed from their arrival on late August 28 until September 1.  In his diary entry for Monday, August 28,  "Nothing of importance occurred, with the exception of a Mr. Richardson dying.  Was buried August 31 at Fort Hall." [Information provided by Don Rivara, his sources included: [1]  Our Proud Past, by Gail I. McCormick, self-published, pp 18, [James Nesmith's Diary of 1843, extracted from the Oregon  Historical Quarterly, December 1906] 

John RICHARDSON (1813-1886): m'd 1835 Britana HINTON; s/o Daniel and Nancy (Townsend) Richardson; traveled with Applegate train; spent winter in Oregon City then moved up to Yamhill County where he established his DLC; 1860 moved to CA and ran a stage station called Willow Springs on the road from Yreka to Oregon; returned to Oregon in 1865 and in  1868 moved to Eldorado mines in Baker county where he worked at the carpenter's trade; he later added mining to his activities; his wife died at Vale in 1883 and is buried there;  in 1885 John moved to Arizona where he died in about 1886; was member of Oregon territorial legislature for several terms; father of six children--John C., Thomas H., Margaret, Benjamin Clayton, Madison G. and James K. P..

John C. RICHARDSON (1837- ): m'd Rebecca A. (Unknown); s/o John and Britania (Hinton) Richardson; settled in Lane county

Margaret RICHARDSON (1841- ): d/o John and Britania (Hinton) Richardson

Minas Gallatin RICHARDSON (1839-c1887): m'd 1877 Marie COLLINS; s/o Daniel and Dorcus (Daugherty) Richardson; father died at Ft. Hall; miner at Baker City and Clarksville; listed in 1870 Baker County census as ditch tender

Richard RICHARDSON (1835- ): m'd CHILDERS, Sarah Elizabeth; s/o John and Britiana (Hinton) Richardson

Sidney Daniel RICHARDSON (1844-1911): s/o Daniel and Dorcus (Daugherty) Richardson; father died at Ft. Hall; born in February after mother arrived in Oregon

Thomas H. RICHARDSON (1839- ): s/o John and Britania (Hinton) Richardson

John RICKARD (1828- ): m'd Susannah (Unknown); attorney; was member of small party organized by Dr. Whitman to travel in advance of wagons to Fort Hall

Thomas RIVERS: see Thomas D. Reeves; listed on scout list of 1843 as Thomas Rivers

Emsley ROBERTS:

James ROBERTS:

Nancy ROBERTS: m'd 1838 Benjamin KELSEY

Solomon ROBERTS:

Louis ROBIDOUX (1796-1868):  m1.?; m2. Guadalupe GARCIA; it is hard to know if this is the Robidoux family mentioned below but the children listed in the 1850 CA census were born in New Mexico up until 1844 when a daughter was born in CA.  Based on the seven year span between the emigration and the census it is easy to imagine that the older children may have married and moved out. Is Guadalupe his second wife.  Research still needed on this family.
Charlotte Matheny [Kirkwood] recalled in her memoirs, "Mr. Rubedeaux's wife was dead and he had a large family of little children.  The eldest of the six or seven was only about twelve years old.  She was tattered, barefooted and very freckled…She was a fine little worker: self-reliant, and the mainstay of her father.  Everyone admired her, and the men of our party were glad to give her a lift when she needed it.  Mr. Rubedeaux walked beside the oxen and the wagon bristling with little heads.  The young girl [I have forgotten her name]walked and drove the loose cattle.  Getting started of a morning with loose cattle everywhere was not an easy task for anyone, but this small girl with her ox whip took her equal and effective part in the general commotion as she cracked her whip and talked to her little herd of lean oxen, some cows, and a calf or two.  I remember her as we passed through the Snake River country.  There were rocks everywhere and I noticed that she limped.  I was sorry for her.  I wonder now why someone did not lend her a horse; plenty of them were driven loose or led tied to the backs of the wagons.  Perhaps she had refused one--I do not know about that.  I do know that she walked most if not all of the way, and drove her herd of cattle.  She drove them as if she liked it and was glad to do it.  Everyone helped her when she needed it.  One day a band of Indians came to us and rode along beside us for aways.  One of them, in passing the small girl, grabbed the ox whip from her hand and dashed away with it.  That whip was dear to her; she clutched at it and screamed.  Her father bounded toward her but he was too late.  The whip was gone.  His face was so red and angry--I remember seeing him pick up a rock and heave it with all his might after the laughing, galloping Indian.  The rock was as big as by head.  It could not have carried twenty feet. I do not know what became of Mr. Rubedeaux and his flock of little motherless children--we never saw them again after we separated from them at The Dalles…but when I think of that girl, I know that in her was the making of a fine, fine woman." [Information provided by Don Rivara, his sources include: [1] pp.12-13, Into the Eye of the Setting Sun, by Charlotte [Matheny] Kirkwood,  pub. by Hewitt-Matheny-Cooper Family Assoc.]

Miss ROBIDOUX (c1831?- ):  d/o Louis Robidoux
Charlotte Matheny [Kirkwood] recalled in her memoirs, "Mr. Rubedeaux's wife was dead and he had a large family of little children.  The eldest of the six or seven was only about twelve years old.  She was tattered, barefooted and very freckled…She was a fine little worker: self-reliant, and the mainstay of her father.  Everyone admired her, and the men of our party were glad to give her a lift when she needed it.  Mr. Rubedeaux walked beside the oxen and the wagon bristling with little heads.  The young girl [I have forgotten her name]walked and drove the loose cattle.  Getting started of a morning with loose cattle everywhere was not an easy task for anyone, but this small girl with her ox whip took her equal and effective part in the general commotion as she cracked her whip and talked to her little herd of lean oxen, some cows, and a calf or two.  I remember her as we passed through the Snake River country.  There were rocks everywhere and I noticed that she limped.  I was sorry for her.  I wonder now why someone did not lend her a horse; plentyj of them were driven loose or led tied to the backs of the wagons.  Perhaps she had refused one--I do not know about that.  I do know that she .  I do know that she walked most if not all of the way, and drove her herd of cattle.  She drove them as if she liked it and was glad to do it.  Everyone helped her when she needed it.  One day a band of Indians came to us and rode along beside us for aways.  One of them, in passing the small girl, grabbed the ox whip from her hand and dashed away with it.  That whip was dear to her; she clutched at it and screamed.  Her father bounded toward her but he was too late.  The whip was gone.  His face was so red and angry--I remember seeing him pick up a rock and heave it with all his might after the laughing, galloping Indian.  The rock was as big as by head.  It could not have carried twenty feet. I do not know what became of Mr. Rubedeaux and his flock of little motherless children--we never saw them again after we separated from them at The Dalles…but when I think of that girl, I know that in her was the making of a fine, fine woman." [Information provided by Don Rivara, his sources include: [1] pp.12-13, Into the Eye of the Setting Sun, by Charlotte [Matheny] Kirkwood,  pub. by Hewitt-Matheny-Cooper Family Assoc.]

Catalina ROBIDOUX (1835- ): s/o Louis Robidoux

Carmel H. ROBIDOUX (1842- ): s/o Louis Robidoux

Luis ROBIDOUX (1838- ): s/o Louis Robidoux

Pasqual ROBIDOUX (1840- ): s/o Louis Robidoux

G. W. RODGERS:

S. P. RODGERS:

Harriet B. ROGERS (1807-1879): m'd 1828 BURNETT, Peter Hardeman; d/o Peter and Sally (Pirtle) Rogers; died in San Francisco, CA

Joseph ROSSIN:

John W. ROWE (1821- ): m'd 1846 Amanda J. MCHALEY

3) Richard ROWLAND: traveled with Sublette and Stewart to Rocky Mountains in 1843 and then returned east; *1: MSS #1180, 8pp letter typescript in collection at OHS

Philip RUBY:

Mrs. Philip RUBY:
"James Nesmith's diary entry for Sunday, September 30, 1843, states, "…Mrs. Rubey died at Grande Ronde and was buried October 1." [Information provided by Don Rivara, his sources include: [1]  Our Proud Past, by Gail I. McCormick, self-published, p. 20, [James Nesmith's Diary of 1843, extracted from the Oregon Historical Quarterly, December 1906]

RUSSELL FAMILY RESEARCHER:
Mrs. Mary RUSSELL
(c1753-1843): m'd Abner Russell (maiden name unknown at this time); Mrs. Russell, mother of Sarah Ellen Russell Frazier McHaley, was 90 years old, died and was buried on Laurel Hill.

Sarah Ellen RUSSELL (c1805-1857) : m1. William FRAZIER; m2. 1830 John McHALEY; settled near Sublimity, Marion Co, ORl buried Twin Oaks Cemetery, Marion Co, OR

William RUSSELL (1822- ): m'd 1848 Elizabeth O'HARA; settled Clackamas Co

*4) Oscar SCARPY: member of Fremont's second expedition

Henry F. SEWELL (1819-1869): m'd 1846 Mary Ann Jones GERRISH; settled Washington Co; died in Dec 1869 from a self inflicted gun shot wound, listed as a farmer and clergyman in the census records; father of  5 children-- James H. (c1846) Laura (c1849), John (c1854) and Anna (1859), Mary (1863); the mother is also deceased because by 1870 census the younger children are all living with the oldest brother, James.

Thomas SHADDEN: listed as Thomas Shaddon in some records for 1843 but was emigrant of "1842"; see 1842 Thomas Shadden

Cornelius SHARP (1819- ): m'd c1845 Mary (Unknown); single in the 1845 Tuality Co census, in 1850 Cornelius Sharp is shown as a gunsmith in Washington Co census with a wife and two daughters (Julia and Caroline); in 1853 Cornelius Sharp and his wife were indicted on the murder of a Mr. Somers at the brothel ran by Mrs. Sharp.  Cornelius Sharp was convicted in early 1854 but escaped from the penitientiary later that year.  His wife was not convicted.

Alva Compton Riggs SHAW (1817-1880): departed late in 1843 and arrived in Linn County in 1844; see 1844 listing

William SHELDON: a party left Platte City, MO May 5th consisting of  William Martin, William Sheldon, M.P. Dougherty, Lindsay Tharp and Parson Reading and arrived at Fitzhugh Mill, a place of rendezvous for those wishing to go to Oregon; a William Sheldon is listed on the census and tax rolls of Tuality/Washington Co 1845-1859;fought in Cayuse War

N. K. SHELTON:

Samuel SHIRLEY:

John M. SHIVELY (1804-1894): m1. 1836 Martha Ann JOHNSON; m2. 1847 Susan L. ELLIOTT; commissioned by Dr. McLaughlin to lay out the town of Oregon City; founded Astoria when he took up DLC in 1843; was a storekeeper and surveyor until November 1842 when his wife died and he headed west; returned east in 1844 where he wrote a guide to Oregon and California; received an appointment as postmaster of Astoria while in Washington, D.C.; returned west in 1847 bringing his son, Charles W.; he died at Astoria, Clatsop Co; Recollections, 19pp, Indiana State Library

SIMKINS FAMILY RESEARCHER:
Hiram SIMKINS
(1826-1905): m'd 1857 Mary Ann GAY; settled on the border between Polk and Yamhill countys; father of sixteen children (George, Newton, Alfred, Mary, John, Jane, Isabel, Andrew, Alicia, Anna M., Rosa M., Louisa, Ettie E., Frasina)

Nathan Koontz SITTON (1825- ): m1. 1847 Priscilla Evaline ROGERS; m2. 1871 Mary (SHELLEY) Laughlin; settled Yamhill Co;  while on guard duty one night he shot what he supposed to be an Indian; it later turned out to be one of mules owned by the Martin brothers;  "Charles Fendall rode horseback most of the way and acted as one of the hunters.  On one hunting expedition he met a young man named Nathan Koontz Sitton on foot making his way toward the east.  He was the Nathan Sitton who had accidentally shot a mule belonging to the captain of another train, thinking it was an Indian.  The captain, angered, started Sitton back on foot.  Fendall persuaded Sitton to continue west.  They spent the first winter together on what is now known as Panther Creek and later married sisters." Nathan became the father of nine children by his first wife (Charles Edward, Amanda Ellen, Caroline E., Ora Ann, Ella Wright, Hiram Wilbur, Noah Huber, Fred Dudley and Elbridge Duvall) and five by his second wife (Benjamin Franklin Ward, Pratt Koontz, Minnie Gertrude, Jennie Grace and Sena Shelley)

Abner T. SMITH (1837- ):  s/o Anderson and Ann (Enyart) Smith

Anderson "Poker" SMITH (1806-1873): m'd 1837 Ann ENYART; settled in Washington Co; buried in Harrison Cemetery, near North Plains, Washington Co, OR; Anderson was the father of (Elijah, Abner, John G., James W., Alexander, Nancy A., Sarah E., Benjamin, Edward, Mary)

Elijah SMITH (1834- ): s/o Anderson and Ann (Enyart) Smith

Isaac W. SMITH (1815-1897): m'd 1846 Mary (Unknown); settled in Washington Co;
"James Nesmith's diary entry for October 24, 1843, he states, "Arrived at the Hudson Bay Company's mill about seven miles above the fort, at twelve o'clock, where we met Waters, Tharp, Marten [sic], and Smith taking up a barge to bring the families down from the Mission." Edward Lenox states that Smith was superintendent of a squad of guards on the trail.  Later on Smith would serve in the Oregon legislature." [Information provided by Don Rivara, his sources included: [1]  Our Proud Past, by Gail I. McCormick, self-published, p. 22, [James Nesmith's Diary of 1843, extracted from the Oregon Historical Quarterly, December 1906]; [2] p. 44, 55, Overland to Oregon, by Edward Lenox, Ye Galleon Press, Fairfield, Washington. [Written in 1904] 

James W. SMITH (1842- ): s/o Anderson and Ann (Enyart) Smith

John G. SMITH (1840-): m1. Rhody Ann (Unknown); s/o Anderson and Ann (Enyart) Smith

Robert SMITH (1822-1888): m'd 1851 Susan APPLEGATE; s/o Richard and Martha Ann (Pitzer) Smith; settled in Douglas Co where he farmed until his death; father of (Richard, Frances, Robert Frank, Jerome, Ellen, Albert and Elmer); parents and siblings came to Oregon in 1853

Samuel C. SMITH (1815- ): settled in Clatsop Co

*3) Sidney SMITH: officer in US army, granted 6 mos leave of absence in order to accompany Stewart Company; "Report of Journey to the Rocky Mountains"; accompanied Sublette-Stewart hunting expedition; MOHS Bulletin 11, 1945 pp 41-53

Thomas SMITH:

Thomas H. SMITH (1826- ): m'd 1845 Maria (Unknown); settled in Columbia Co (now WA)

Chauncey D. SPENCER: is enumerated in 1845 Champoeg census and 1847 Yamhill Co tax rolls.  No records located after 1847

Christopher STEMMERMAN (1814-1888): m1. ; m2. 1851 Sarah GRACEN; listed in 1860 Scaramento Co, CA census, by 1870 and 1880 census is located in Coos Co, OR; father of 6 children by second wife (George W., Josephine, Charles, Rosella, James Albert and Ora Dell);  had at least three children by his first wife (Henry b. c1841 and Mary b. c1839, William b.c1848)

Mrs. Christopher STEMMERMAN ( -c1848): m'd Christopher STEMMERMAN

Henry STEMMERMAN (1841- ): s/o Christopher Stemmerman and his first wife; not found after the 1850 census

Mary STEMMERMAN (1839- ): d/o Christopher Stemmerman and his first wife; in 1860 census living with the A.F. White family in Santa Clara, CA

George STERLING:

Edward STEVENSON ( -1843): died August 9 of fever contracted near Fort Laramie;
"In James Nesmith's diary entry for Monday, July 31, 1843, "Came up to Martin's company about 1:00 and found some very sick men in the company.  Among the rest were Mr. Payne and Stevenson.  The latter seemed very dangerous of fever and flighty, uttering incoherent sentences.  His situation excited my sympathy, to see a fine stout young man reduced to a wreck by disease.  I took a parting look, never expecting to behold him again." Edward Lenox also spoke of Stevenson: "One of our men, Edward Stephenson, traveling with J. A. Masters, fell sick of a fever.  He became weaker every day, and at length died in the wagon as it rolled along one afternoon.  The next morning he was buried beside the road, and we left him there in the wilderness, one of the multitude of victims of the trip across the plains." [Information provided by Don Rivara, his sources included: [1]  Our Proud Past, by Gail I. McCormick, self-published, pp 12, [James Nesmith's Diary of 1843, extracted from the Oregon Historical Quarterly, December 1906]; [2]  pp.56-59 Overland to Oregon, by Edward Lenox, 1904, republished by Ye Galleon Press, Fairfield, Washington]

Catherine STEWART (1843- ): d/o Peter and Rebecca Stewart; born on July 1, 1843 at Sleepy Grove

Daughter STEWART (1843- ): d/o Peter and Rebecca (Cason) Stewart; b. at Sleepy Grove July 1, 1843

Peter Grant STEWART (1809-1900): m1. c1829??; m2. 1842 Rebecca Rawlings CASON; m3. 1876 Mrs. Eliza Rosecrans; watchmaker and a jeweler; member of the executive committee of the Oregon Provisional Government;
"Peter Stewart and James Nesmith rescued the drowning William Vaughan in the Kansas River, rolling him over a barrel and pumping his arms to save his life.  William H. Vaughan, who was traveling with the Stewarts, alternated with the two Stewart sons in driving the Stewart wagon." [Information provided by Don Rivara, his sources included: [1] Overland to Oregon, p,39-40,Ye Galleon Press, Fairfield, Washington. [written in 1904]

Sir William Drummond STEWART (1795-1871):  Sir William Drummond Stewart was a Scottish nobleman who was drawn to the adventure of North America and the west.   Upon his arrival he made the acquaintance of some of the early trappers and outfitters for the Rocky Mountain Fur Company.  He joined forces with them and is found throughout the west in the 1830s with various hunting expeditions, including a visit to Ft. Vancouver with Wyeth in 1834.  In 1843 he organized a "party of pleasure" excursion to see the Rocky Mountains. William Sublette led the party of 60 consisting of "lawyers, botanists, Bugg Ketchers, Hunters, etc".  William Sublette's brother, Solomon, joined with his party making 80 in the party with 18 carts, 3 wagons and one small "Barouche"
"In James Nesmith's diary entry for Sunday, July 23, 1843, "Two men from Child's [Chiles's] company met us this evening, informing us that they were all across the north fork, about ten miles ahead, but could not find Sir William Stewart's gum elastic boat as they had directions they would find it in the forks of a tree." [James Nesmith's Diary of 1843 Oregon Historical Quarterly, December 1906] [portrait as painted by Alfred Jacob Miller]

Catherine STOREY (1833- ): m'd 1853 Thomas George NAYLOR; may have been a sister to Sarah, married Thomas Naylor after her death

James STOREY (1827- ): may have been a brother of Catherine and Sarah.  Appears in the 1860 Marion County census with a wife and four children and then is not found in Oregon again.

Sarah STOREY (1820-1852): m'd 1840 Thomas George NAYLOR; d/o Thomas Storey; died on Tualatin Plains in 1852; was the mother of the following children  (Sarah Catherine, Charles, Hardenia P., James Henry, Margaret A., Thomas Chapman and John); one son was killed on the trail when he was ran over by a wagon

Alexander R. STOUGHTON (1807- ): m1. 1827 Elizabeth SEXTON; m2. 1840 Nancy (Unknown); in the 1845 Tuality Co census; moved to Marion Co by 1850 where he stayed until sometime before 1870 when he is enumberated in the Columbia County Census; later sold part of land and stock due to wife's illness; was indicted several times in Marion County for theft, including once when his son testified against him.  In 1882, at the age of 75, he is listed as an inmate of Columbia Co Penitentiary; 13 years later, at the age of 88 he is enumerated in the Oregon State Penitentiary.  I initially thought it had to be a son or another with his name but the data seems to confirm that it is actually Alexander.  "In his diary entry for  Saturday, August 19, James Nesmith states that while searching for some missing cattle, "we ascertain at Stoughton's camp that they were driven ahead." [Information provided by Don Rivara] 

John A. STOUGHTON (1830-1924 ): m'd 1850 Frances E. (Unknown); s/o Alexander and Elizabeth (Sexton) Stoughton; almost drowned while crossing the Snake River, rescued by Dr. Whitman;found in Marion County in 1850 and Washington County, OR in 1870; later years lived in Spokane, WA.    Recollections, Washington Historical Quarterly 15 (1924) p.208-10; Told By the Pioneers, Vol 1 pp 73-74 "With Whitman on the Way West"

Mary B. STOUGHTON (1820-1904): m'd 1845 John Lord FORCE; d/o Alexander and Elizabeth (Sexton) Stoughton;  lived in Marion County with her husband and children; after the death of her husband in 1864 she moved to Red Bluff, CA along with her children.  She died there in 1904.  Mary was the mother of (Anna M., Eliza Amy, Elizabeth, Jannette Darling, John M., Lillie, Mary E., and Nettie)

Eli STOUT (1828 - ):  m'd Nancy J. (Unknown); appears in Marion Co records until about 1860; 1870 is in Union Co; 1879 wife files for divorce in Umatilla Co

Ephraim STOUT Sr. (1775-1852): m'd 1797 Jane SMITH; settled Marion Co; s/o Samuel and Rachel (Chancey) Stout; Ephraim was the father of (Ephraim Jr., James, Hugh, Rachel Mary, Annie, Jane and John); it is not know if his wife accompanied him or died prior to the emigration; some of his children came west in later years and some did not make the journey at all

Hugh STOUT (1810- ): m'd 1827 Anna BROWN; s/o Ephraim and Jane (Smith) Stout; settled in Marion county through the 1850s; by 1870 is enumerated as an inmate of the asylum at Portland; if wife made the emigration she died prior to 1850 census

Milly STOUT (1840- ): d/o Hugh and Anna (Brown) Stout

Rachel Mary STOUT (c1818-1861): m'd 1834 Abraham OLINGER; d/o Ephraim and Jane (Smith) Stout Sr.; settled in the Waldo Hills area of Marion Co with her husband and children; mother of  twelve children including: (Amanda, Nancy, Sarah A., Martha, Ephraim, Oroseltha, Lucretia, Alice, Silas A. and John);  buried in Olinger Cemetery, Marion Co, OR

STRAIGHT FAMILY RESEARCHER:
Cyrus Branson STRAIGHT (1838-1916): m'd 1865 Lucinda Ester MAEL; s/o Hiram and Susan (Laswell) Straight; shown as Silas in the 1850 Clackamas Co census; father of five children (George, Clarana, Minnie, Freddie and Ida E.); died in Clackamas Co, OR; buried Hiram Straight Cemetery, Clackamas Co, OR

Hiram Aldrich STRAIGHT (1814 -1897): m'd 1837 Susan LASWELL; settled in Clackamas Co; listed as lawyer in 1850 Clackamas Co census; foreman of the jury during the Whitman Massacre trial; served in territorial legislature; father of 7 children (Cyrus Branson, Mary Etta, Jane, Hiram Jr., George, Julia and John); buried Hiram Straight Cemetery, Clackamas Co, OR

Mary Etta STRAIGHT (1843-1916): m1. 1860 John CASON; m2. 1878 Henry LUCAS; m3. John GEORGE; d/o Hiram and Susan (Laswell) Straight; born 04 Sep 1843 shortly after arrival; settled in Clackamas Co; mother of four children by first marriage(Austin , William , Julia , Carrie M. ) and one child by second marriage (Henry George)

Cornelius "Corny" STRINGER (c1813-1843): s/o Cornelius Stringer; reportedly drowned while attempting to help Miles Eyers on a crossing of the Snake River;
"Edward Lenox states in his recollections, "We soon came to the treacherous Snake River, where we lost two of our men, Ayres and Stringer.  Seeing the difficulty which I had in crossing, and discouraged by the hardships of the ford at this point, they insisted upon keeping the left side of the river, with the intention of making a crossing farther down at Fort Boise.  They were compelled to cross before they reached the point which they had in view, by the closing in of the canyon.  Ayres, who was an old man about sixty, got into trouble with his mule in crossing the stream.  Stringer, who was about thirty years of age, went to his relief, and both of them were drowned in sight of their women folks whom they had ferried across.  The bodies were never recovered.  Stringer's father with Ayres' son with the women folks, managed to make their way on until they struck our trail which they followed through to the Columbia River." [Information provided by Don Rivara, his sources included: [1] pp67-68,  Overland to Oregon, by Edward Lenox, written in 1904, republished by Ye Galleon Press, Fairfield, Washington.] 

Cornelius STRINGER (1786-c1865): born in England, lived and farmed in Marion county until his death; did not marry after his arrival in Oregon

*3) Solomon SUBLETTE: guide for party that included two priests and 15 others; met and joined brother, William's party

*3) William SUBLETTE: guide for the Sir William Drummond Stewart "party of pleasure" excursion to see the Rocky Mountains; led party of 60 consisting of "lawyers, botanists, Bugg Ketchers, Hunters, etc"; brother, Solomon, joined with his party making 80 in party with 18 carts, 3 wagons and one small "Barouche"; crossed the continent in 1823 with Jedediah Smith

George SUMMERS (c1810 -1873): settled Clatsop Co where he was a merchant; legislator from Clatsop Co in 1846; was single throughout his time in Oregon

W. C. SUMMERS:

Miriam SUMNERS (1818- c1881): m'd Claiborne PAINE; s/o Owen and Lucy V. (Sowers) Sumners

Nathaniel SUTTON: see Nathan Koontz SITTON

Louisa SWAN (1808-1879): m'd 1826 David Thomas LENOX; d/o George Swan; mother of 11 children (America, Edward Henry, Mary Ann, Elizabeth J., George Washington, David Jr., Frances Deborah, Samuel Swan, Susan Amanda, Margaret Ann, James Thomas); settled in Washington county with her husband and children; buried West Union Cemetery, Washington Co, OR

Granville Perry SWIFT (1821-1875): m'd 1858 Eliza Jane TATE; s/o William Thomas and Rachel Boone (Walker) Swift; wintered in OR; 1844 moved to CA where he was a successful farmer and wine grower; died in Napa Co; father of William and Granville Perry

Mr. TABEAU ( -1844): member of Fremont's second expedition; on the return trip "May 9, Presently Carson came to me and reported Tabeau, who early in the day had left his post, and, without my knowledge, rode back to the camp we had left in search of a lame mule, had not returned......May 10th, This morning, as soon as there was light enough to follow tracks, I set out myself with Mr. Fitzpatrick and several men in search of Tabeau....Blood upon the leaves and beaten-down bushes showed that he had got his wound about twenty paces from where he fell, and that he had struggled for his life.  He had probably been shot throught the lungs with an arrow.  From the place where he lay and bled, it could be seen that he had been dragged to the bank of the river, and thrown into it.  No vestige of what had belonged to him could be found, except a fragment of his horse equipment."

*4) Theodore TALBOT: with Fremont expedition 1843-44 for the exploration of the Oregon Country; was described in memoirs of Fremont as gentleman "of Washington City", who joined expedition "with a view to advancement in his profession"; *1: MSS #773, 155pp photostat of handscript journal in collection at OHS.

Stephen TARBOX (1812-1878): had no family in Oregon; worked as a farm laborer; moved around between Clatsop, Washington and Yamhill Counties; later settled in Benton Co area where he died near Monroe in 1878; was of Irish descent; spent time as a private in the late 1830s in the 1st Regiment of Dragoons under the command of Stephen A Kearney stationed at Ft. Leavenworth

Cyrene B. TAYLOR (1815-1911): m'd 1831 Miles CARY; (note: name also seen as Syrena Taylor); was born in Richmond, VA July 24, 1815; brought black slave girl with her; did not remarry after her husband's death in 1858;  remained in Yamhill Co until her death in 1911

Jeremiah TELLER: see Jeremiah TULLER

B. TESSON: member of Fremont's second expedition; turned back for home on September 22

Lindsey THARP: (also seen as Lindsey Thorp); a party left Platte City, MO May 5th consisting of  William Martin, William Sheldon, M.P. Dougherty, Lindsay Tharp and Parson Reading and arrived at Fitzhugh Mill, a place of rendezvous for those wishing to go to Oregon; settled in Clatsop Co; " In James Nesmith's diary entry for October 24, 1843, he states, "Arrived at the Hudson Bay Company's mill about seven miles above the fort, at twelve o'clock, where we met Waters, Tharp, Marten [sic], and Smith taking up a barge to bring the families down from the Mission." [Information provided by Don Rivara, his sources included: [1]  Our Proud Past, by Gail I. McCormick, self-published, p. 22, [James Nesmith's Diary of 1843, extracted from the Oregon Historical Quarterly, December 1906]

John THOMPSON: this may be same Thompson that traveled to CA mines with Eberman, Wood and O'Brien; if so he was victim of indian massacre in 1848 (OHSQ Vol II p.180-184)

Lucinda THOMPSON (1810-1887): m'd 1831 William BEAGLE; d/o William and Nancy (Drinkard) Thompson; buried Olney Cemetery, Pendleton, Umatilla Co, OR

*4) Charles TOWNS: " July14--I also admitted into the party Charles Towns--a native of St. Louis, a servicable man, with many of the qualities of a good voyageur; Feb 27, 1844 after great difficulties in the snows of the mountains "Towns became light-headed, wandering off into the woods without knowing where he was going, and Jacob brought him back....March 1, Charles Towns, who had not yet recovered his mind, went to swim in the river, as if it were cummer and the stream placid, when it was a cold mountain-torrent foaming among rocks." [John Charles Fremont]

D. TRAINOR.:

Jeremiah G. TULLER: started west in 1843 but turned back and made emigration in 1844; see 1844 listing

Eliza TURNER (1807-aft 1880): m1. Miles EYRE; m2. 1847 James CAMPBELL; m3. 1853 William HOBSON; after death of husband the family was transported from the Snake River to Whitman's Mission where they remained through the winter; May 1845 transported to Oregon City and from there to  Marion Co; during 1846-47 her girls were placed in a boarding school; in 1847 Eliza applies for a land claim in Champoeg (later Marion) county; probate on Mile Eyre was filed in Marion Co and the administrator was named as James Campbell who later became the second husband of Eliza;  they had two children before Eliza divorced James Campbell; Eliza later married William Hobson who had also been on the 1843 train and resided at Astoria, Clatsop Co, OR

John UMICKER: (also seen as John Umnicker)

Anna C. VANCE (c1834-c1868): m'd 1851 William HAWKINS; d/o Samuel and Mary (Howell) Vance; mother of  (Ellen, George E., Arabella E., Emily, Julia and Albert)

Elizabeth VANCE (c1840-aft 1860): m'd 1858 John GRIFFIN; d/o Samuel and Mary (Howell) Vance

Samuel N. VANCE (1808-aft 1880): m1. Mary HOWELL; m2. 1851 Mrs. Mary Ellen (  ) WILLIS; settled in Clackamas county; father of four known children by first wife (Anna C., Elizabeth and Temperance); no known children by second wife

Temperance VANCE (c1841-c1859): m'd 1857 Stephen FOSTER; d/o Samuel and Mary (Howell) Vance

Auguste VASQUEZ: member of Fremont's second expedition;  when party later split into two partys for exploration he stayed with Fremont; turned back for home on September 22

VAUGHAN FAMILY RESEARCHER:
William Hatchette VAUGHAN
(1822-1906): m'd 1847 Susan Mary OFFICER; almost drowned when struck by an attack of cramps while leading some stock across the Kansas river; worked as a fence and barn builder for the Hudson Bay Company; 1844 settled on the Molalla Prairie; over time he built a good relationship with the local Molalla tribe and mediated for them with the locals; buried at Adams Cemetery near Molalla;
"William was born in Rutherford County, Tennessee, on January 17, 1822, the son of James Vaughan and Nancy [Hatchette] Vaughan; so he was twenty-one when he crossed the plains.  Vaughan had the aspiration to attend West Point to receive a military education and received an appointment through the efforts of an older brother and the local congressman.  His father refused to allow William to attend.  When William left his home in Tennessee, he never saw his family again. Vaughan made an agreement with the Peter Stewart family to work for his food on the trip west.  He alternately drove their wagon. In the Kansas River, he almost drowned, being rescued by James Nesmith and Peter Stewart, who rolled him on a keg and pumped his arms to save his life. Two days later he was able to resume his duties.  He settled near Molalla, Clackamas County, upon arriving in Oregon.  Two other settlers, William Russell and John Waggoner, were driven away by the hostile Molalla Indians.  Later William developed a trust with the Molallas and often mediated for them in disputes among tribes. William married Susan Mary Officer, daughter of James Officer, on August 27, 1847. The Officers had come to Oregon in 1845. Shortly after the marriage, the Whitman Massacre occurred, and William joined the volunteer army to punish the Cayuse Indians and then returned to his bride and farm. The Vaughans prospered, and their large home still stands on Macksburg Road near Molalla. William, who was called "Uncle Billy" in his later years, died in 1906 at the age of eighty-four.  Susan died in 1911.
        As one can tell from the names of their children, the Vaughans were strong Confederate sympathizers during the Civil War. Their eleven children were Franklin White Vaughan, born 1849; Isom Crandall Vaughan, born 1852; Nancy Virginia Vaughan, born 1854, who married Oren Cutting; Mary Tennessee Vaughan, born 1857, who married George T. Frazier; Viola Evaline Vaughan, born 1860, who married John Stubbs and later William Engle; Stonewall Jackson Vaughan, born 1862, who married Florence Patty; Hardee Longstreet Vaughan, born 1865; Susan Florida Vaughan, born 1868, married Nathan Moody; John Calhoun Vaughan, born 1870, who never married; Cora Kuehn Vaughan, born 1873, who married Jenks McCown; William Officer Vaughan, born 1876." [Information provided by Don Rivara, his sources included: [1]  Our Proud Past, by Gail I. McCormick, self-published, pp 34-38, [James Nesmith's Diary of 1843, extracted from the Oregon Historical Quarterly, December 1906.]

George VERNON: believe this to be George Washington Vernon that emigrated in 1853 with family and settled in Linn County; apparently one of those that returned east sometime after his arrival in 1843

*4) Baptiste VERROT: member of Fremont's second expedition

John B. WAGGONER:

Jacob M. WAIR:

WALDO FAMILY RESEARCHER:
Avarilla WALDO
(1834-1885): d/o Daniel and Malinda (Lunsford) Waldo; m'd 1855 Robert C. HAYNE, no children; m'd c.1863 Samuel BASS, two children: Daniel Waldo and Jessie Logan; Avarilla is buried Salem Pioneer Cemetery, Salem, Marion Co, OR.   [Avarilla is often confused with her aunt Avarilla (Turpin) Waldo wife of Daniel Waldo's brother John B. Waldo (not to be confused with Daniel Waldo's son John B. Waldo).  Avarilla (Turpin) Waldo moved to Oregon after her husband's death where she married Rev. Jesse Moreland in 1863; she died in Portland in 1891.]  

Daniel WALDO (1800-1880): m'd 1825 LUNSFORD, Malinda; s/o Jedediah and Polly (Porter) Waldo; had a prosperous farm in MO but was suffering from the augue [a form of malaria] that was prevalent along the rivers of the Mississippi Valley; family was involved in the trade between MO and Santa Fe;  was elected to provisional government and legislature in 1844; served as county judge but did not actively seek public office; brother, William, was Whig candidate for governor of CA when it was admitted to the union; was the father of 10 (11?) children (three children died prior to emigration, the remaining children died after emigration to Oregon,  they include: Ann Josephine, Avarilla, David, Jedediah, John Breckenridge, Mary Porter, Narcissa, and William); Daniel  is buried Salem Pioneer Cemetery, Salem, Marion Co, OR   Note: Information stating that America Waldo Bogle was his daughter has been proven incorrect.

David WALDO (1828-1853): s/o Daniel and Malinda (Lunsford) Waldo; was mining near Yreka, CA with friends when ambushed by Indians in Nov 1853.  David was killed and was buried at that location.

Mary Porter WALDO (1840-1911): m'd 1862 David LOGAN; d/o Daniel and Malinda (Lunsford) Waldo; Mary is buried Salem Pioneer Cemetery, Salem, Marion Co, OR  

Narcissa WALDO (1829-1887): m'd 1865James Charles BROWN; d/o Daniel and Malinda (Lunsford) Waldo; settled in Marion County with her husband; was well know for her needlework and received several awards at local fairs; died of typhoid fever; Narcissa had two children: George Glanville and Josephine Waldo; Narcissa is buried Salem Pioneer Cemetery, Salem, Marion Co, OR  

William WALDO (1832-1911): never married; s/o Daniel and Malinda (Lunsford) Waldo; went to CA to mine and engaged in business at Yreka in 1852; returned east and in 1853 drove a large herd of cattle across the plains;  he returned east several times and studied at the University of Missouri; studied law in Salem; admitted to bar in 1863;  became interested in Salem woolen mills and traveled to Australia in 1870 in conjunction with that interest; State Senator 1880 & 1882; President of the Senate in 1885;  William is buried Salem Pioneer Cemetery, Salem, Marion Co, OR  

Joseph Reddeford WALKER: [His biographer says Rutherford, not Reddeford] Joseph was a famous mountain man.  He had agreed to meet the Joseph Chiles California-bound party at Fort Laramie to guide the group to California via Walker Lake and Walker Pass.  He traveled with the group from Fort Laramie to the California cut-off.  He died in California in his late seventies.  His brother was Joel Walker, also a famed mountain man. Information provided by Don Rivara, his sources included; [1]  Our Proud Past, by Gail I. McCormick, self-published, pp 117[James Nesmith's Diary of 1843, extracted from the Oregon Historical Quarterly, December 1906]

T. B. WARD:

WARNOCK FAMILY RESEARCHER:
John Francis
WARNOCK
(1816-1885): m'd 1845 Mary HALLEY; born in Scotland; well educated; apprenticed as a sailor at a young age; traveled extensively; granted commission as the Captain of a trading schooner; resigned commission and sailed on Russian ship to San Francisco where he settled for a brief period; became trapper, trader; was reportedly imprisoned for a time in a Mexican prison; reportedly spoke several languages and was used often as an interpreter with the indians; later removed to OR where he spent time in Yamhill, Clackamas, Multnomah and Marion counties; remaining years spent in Marion Co where he is buried in Miller Cemetery

James W. WATERS: was emigrant of 1843; went to meet train of 1844 expecting family to be on train; guided train to Willamette Valley

John WATSON:

Margaret WATSON (1822-1900): m'd 1839 John J. BURTON

James WELCH: m'd Nancy DICKERSON; wife and 3 boys started to Oregon in 1843 with a number of families from near Bloomington, IA but turned back and remained at St. Joseph, MO until spring of 1844; see 1844

William N. WELLS:

H./ N.WHEELER:
"In James Nesmith's diary entry for Friday, September 8, 1843, he states, "Had a fight in camp this evening.  Old Zachary stabbed Mr. Wheeler with his knife." [Information provided by Don Rivara, his sources included: [1]  Our Proud Past, by Gail I. McCormick, self-published, p. 19, [James Nesmith's Diary of 1843, extracted from the Oregon Historical Quarterly, December 1906]

James WHITE FAMILY RESEARCHER:
Elizabeth Jane WHITE
(1842- ): Samuel C. TOMLINSON; d/o James and Rhoda (Kinzie) White
"Elizabeth was born in 1842 in Michigan, the daughter of James and Rhoda [Kinzie] White.  She was just a year old during the crossing. The family settled in Polk County on the Willamette River opposite Salem. She later married Samuel C. Tomlinson, on July 5, 1857, in Polk County, Oregon, when she was fifteen." [Information provided by Don Rivara, his sources in addition to this web site included: [1] pp.292-293, Polk County Pioneers--Study of the Inhabitants Listed in the 1850 Federal Census of Polk County, Oregon, by Shirley H. O'Neil, self-published, 2002]

James WHITE (1804-1854 ): m1,: m2. 1841 Rhoda KINZIE; settled in Polk Co; James was killed in 1854 when the steamboat Gazelle exploded near Oregon City, killing many passengers;  "James White was born in 1804 in Armstrong County, Pennsylvania.  After the death of his first wife James married Rhoda Kinzie on January 18, 1841, in Berrien County, Michigan. James, Rhoda, and his children Leonard, Methelclemy, Sarah, Sophia, and their daughter Elizabeth crossed the plains in 1843." [Information provided by Don Rivara, his sources in addition to this web site included: [1] pp.292-293, Polk County Pioneers--Study of the Inhabitants Listed in the 1850 Federal Census of Polk County, Oregon, by Shirley H. O'Neil, self-published, 2002]  "We headed Sweet Water and camped at a lake on the divide.  There James White struck his wife.  Bob Smith wanted to whip him, but Olinger thought he served her right for abusing his little girls." [ Recollections of An Oregon Pioneer of 1843 by Samuel Penter (OHSQ Vol 7 p55-61)]  

Leonard WHITE (1827- ): s/o James and (first wife) White;
"Leonard was born about 1827 in Indiana, the son of James White and his first wife.  He was sixteen years old at the time of the 1843 crossing. Leonard worked with his father and stepmother in the operation of the Salem ferry until the middle 1850's when he became the captain of the steamboat Colonel Wright.  About 1854 Leonard married Gertude Unknown. He then moved to Deschutes, Wasco County, Oregon.  The 1860 U.S. Census of that county shows that Leonard and Gertrude had these children:  Judd, 5, born OR; and Tonata, 4, born OR."  [Information provided by Don Rivara, his sources in addition to this web site included: [1] pp.292-293, Polk County Pioneers--Study of the Inhabitants Listed in the 1850 Federal Census of Polk County, Oregon, by Shirley H. O'Neil, self-published, 2002]   

Methotemy WHITE (1829- ): s/o James and (first wife) White;
" Methclemy was born in 1829 in Indiana, the daughter/son of James  White and his first wife.  Methclemy's mother died sometime before 1841, and his father married Rhoda Kinzie.  He was fourteen years old at the time of the 1843 crossing.  The family settled in Polk County, Oregon, on the Willamette River opposite Salem.  Methclemy and his brothers helped to operate the ferry across the river to Salem."  [Information provided by Don Rivara, his sources in addition to this web site included: [1] pp.292-293, Polk County Pioneers--Study of the Inhabitants Listed in the 1850 Federal Census of Polk County, Oregon, by Shirley H. O'Neil, self-published, 2002]     

*4) Patrick WHITE: member of Fremont's second expedition; turned back for home on September 22

Sarah WHITE (1834- ): d/o James and (first wife) White;
"Sarah was born  about 1834 in Indiana, the daughter of James White and his first wife.  Sarah's mother died before 1841, and his father then married Rhoda Kinzie.  Sarah was nine years old when the family crossed the plains in 1843.  She later married Elias Robbins."  [Information provided by Don Rivara, his sources in addition to this web site included: [1] pp.292-293, Polk County Pioneers--Study of the Inhabitants Listed in the 1850 Federal Census of Polk County, Oregon, by Shirley H. O'Neil, self-published, 2002]     

Sophia WHITE (1837- ): d/o James and (first wife) White;
"Sophia was born about 1837 in Indiana, the daughter of James White and his first wife.  Sophia's mother died about 1840, and her father then married Rhoda Kinzie.  Sophia was six years old when the family crossed the plains in 1843."  [Information provided by Don Rivara, his sources in addition to this web site included: [1] pp.292-293, Polk County Pioneers--Study of the Inhabitants Listed in the 1850 Federal Census of Polk County, Oregon, by Shirley H. O'Neil, self-published, 2002]       

Perrin Beza WHITMAN (1830-1916): m'd 1854 Priscilla Mace PARKER; nephew of Dr. Whitman, member of small party selected by Dr. Whitman to go in advance of wagon train to Fort Hall; worked with the Indians at the Dalles; after Whitman Massacre removed to Marion County where he married and resided for a period of time; died in Lewiston, Nez Perce Co, ID

Harriet WILCOX (1818-1883):

Archibald WILKES (1821-1901): m'd 1843 Mahala GLENN; Archibald may have made the 1843 emigration; he was married in March 1843 and possibly returned east because he is noted as an emigrant of 1845 with his wife and son

WILLIAMS FAMILY RESEARCHER:
Benjamin
WILLIAMS
(1818-1852): m'd Harriet WINGFIELD; s/o Richard and Keziah (Huckabee) Williams; Benjamin was a farmer and a carpenter.  He spent his time between Washington County and Douglas County where he helped Jesse Applegate on his land.  Ben took care of Jesse's farm in Dallas in 1846 when Jesse was gone exploring what became the Applegate Trail/Southern Route.  While in Dallas, Ben's son, Silas was born.  Ben died in Washington county of lung fever June 18, 1852 leaving behind a wife and four small children.  His wife married second Warren Goodell.  She was the niece of Jesse, Charles and Lindsay Applegate.

David WILLIAMS (1819- ): m'd Rachel KELSEY; s/o Richard and Keziah (Huckabee) Williams.  David settled in Yamhill Co and  in the 1850 Washington County census he is listed as a merchant.  About 1865 he moved his family to Contra Costa Co, CA, taking with them Benjamin's sons  Silas Thomas and Joseph.  David remained in California and is buried in San Lorenzo Cemetery near Hayward, CA

Edward WILLIAMS: listed on several lists as an emigrant of 1843; further information not found on Edward at this time

George Washington WILLIAMS (1842- ): s/o David & Rachel (Kelsey) Williams

Isaac WILLIAMS: cut off at Fort Hall for California;  the 1850 Santa Cruz, CA census shows an Isaac Williams, age 27 living with wife Lydia, living nearby is James Williams; the 1860 census shows Isaac still in Santa Cruz Co, CA with a wife and small children so it is appears he may have remained there; "In James Nesmith's diary entry for Wednesday, July 12, 1843, `Sold a gun at camp this morning, belonging to Issac Williams, for having gone to sleep on post last night.'  Williams was the captain of a guard division during the crossing.  Nathan Sutton, who mistakenly shot a mule in the middle of his night watch, was in Williams' division." [information provided by Don Rivara. In addition to the present website his Sources included: [1]  Our Proud Past, by Gail I. McCormick, self-published, pp 15, [James Nesmith's Diary of 1843, extracted from the Oregon Historical Quarterly, December 1906]

James WILLIAMS: cutoff from Fort Hall for California with the Joseph Childs company;  the 1850 Santa Cruz Co, CA census shows a James Williams, age 36 living with what may be a wife and small children, living nearby is Isaac Williams; the 1860 Santa Cruz Co, CA census show James still living in the area so it appears he may have remained there; "In his diary entry for Friday, June 30, James Nesmith states, "Come stir in camp this morning in consequence of a sentinel's gun going off accidentally, which killed a mule belonging to James Williams, the bullet breaking the mule's neck.  This is the most serious accident that has yet occurred from carelessness in the use of firearms, though, judging from the carelessness of the men, I have anticipated more serious accidents before this time, and if they do not occur, they will be avoided by great good luck, not by precaution."  We learn from the memoirs of Edwin Lenox that the sentinel who shot the mule was Nathan Sutton. [information provided by Don Rivara. In addition to the present website his Sources included: [1]  Our Proud Past, by Gail I. McCormick, self-published, pp 12, 13, James Nesmith's Diary of 1843, extracted from the Oregon Historical Quarterly, December 1906; [2] pp. 52-56, Overland to Oregon, by Edward Lenox, written in 1904, republished by Ye Galleon Press, Fairfield, Washington.]

John WILLIAMS: cutoff from Fort Hall for California with the Joseph Childs company; there are a multitude of John Williams in the 1850 and 1860 census so without extensive research it is hard to know if he remained there or not

Mary Anna Louise C. WILLIAMS (1815- ): m'd 1834 HOLMES, William L.; settled Clackamas Co where she is shown in the 1850, 1860, 1870 and 1880 census; her husband died Sep 1880

Mary Jane WILLIAMS (1843- ): d/o David & Rachel (Kelsey) Williams; born at end of trail on Nov 2, 1843

Squire F. WILLIAMS (c1826- ): cutoff from Fort Hall for California with the Joseph Childs company; Squire F. Williams is shown in the 1850 Louisville and vicinity, El Dorado Co, CA census with $800;  by 1860 Squire F. Williams is found in the Grand River Twp, Henry Co, MO census living with a wife and children;  if this is the same Squire Williams it appears he may have returned home

Mary Virginia WILLIS (c1842- ): m'd Josiah HOWELL; step daughter of  Samuel Vance

James WILMONT: (also seen as Joseph Wilmont)

William WILSON FAMILY RESEARCHER:
Caroline WILSON (1842- ): d/o William and Mary (Mills) Wilson; 1850 living with parents in Washington Co

John R. WILSON (1841-1891): m1. 1860 MCNAMER, Miranda; m2. 1875 McMahon (TONG) Rebecca Mrs.; s/o William and Mary (Mills) Wilson; appears to have lived in Washington Co most of his life according to 1850, 1860 and 1880 census information

Rachel WILSON (1843- ): d/o William and Mary (Mills) Wilson; living in Washington county with her parents in the 1850 and 1860 census

William WILSON (1820-1899): m1. 1840 Mary Jane "Polly" MILLS; m2. 1850 Mrs. Sarah (PHILLIPS) Tedwell; m3. 1893 Sarah HOARD; s/o John and Sarah Wilson; settled in Washington Co where he remained except for 1849 trip to CA to mine for gold

Harriet WINGFIELD: m1. 1838 Benjamin WILLIAMS; m2. Warren GOODELL;  Harriet's mother was the sister of Charles, Lindsay and Jesse Applegate; after the death of her husband from lung fever she moved to Yoncalla to be near her uncles and married Warren Goodell; buried in the Yoncalla Pioneer Cemetery next to her second husband, Warren Goodell

William H. WINTER: traveled in a party of eight with Overton Johnson; at Fort Boise, Boardman, Johnson and Winter continued on to Oregon by the established route; went to CA in 1844; 1845 returned east with Overton by way of the Oregon Trail; coauthored an account entitled "Route Across the Rocky Mountains, with a Description of Oregon and California"

Tallmadge Benjamin WOOD (1817-1848); s/o Jesse and Rebecca (Bryan) Wood; a native of NY he wrote several letters to family and friends from Oregon that have been preserved.  Evidence  supports the theory that he was the Benjamin Wood that was killed by Indians in 1848 in the California gold mines. "was well educated man from New England and New York; lived with Eberman family in IL and then in Milford, MO; emigrated in 1843 with Ninian Eberman; worked at Hunt's mill and went to California mines; was a man of about thirty and was very ingenious when it came to making mechanical devices; discovered gold on American River at a place later called Murderer's Bar; while several members of his group left for supplies, Wood and several others were massacred by indians." (OHSQ June 1901 Vol II p.180-184)

Joseph Wareham WOODS (1817-1907): m'd 1845 Martha Jane WHITE; s/o Joseph and Lucy (Maynard) Woods; Joseph was b. 18 Jun 1813 in Westborough, Massachusetts; after arriving in Oregon he settled in Washington Co where he married Martha Jane White 31 Aug 1845;  Joseph and his family appear in the Washington Co census for 1850, 1860, 1870, 1880; in the 1900 census he and his wife are living in Klickitat Co, WA next to their son, Alfred; he was the father of  8 children, 4 of whom were still living in 1900; Joseph died at Cleveland, Klickitat Co, WA 20 Feb 1907 and is buried in the Cleveland Cemetery next to his wife.

*4) Tiery WRIGHT: member of Fremont's second expedition

ZACHARY FAMILY RESEARCHER:
Alexander
ZACHARY
(1802-1859): m'd 1822 Sarah LUSTER; settled Washington Co; s/o Bartholomew (Bartlett) and Polly (Bruce) Zachary Sr.; was shown in the Hempstead Co, AR census in 1828 and 1830; 1840 appears to have been in TX; was in Milton City, Washington Co, OR census for 1845 and 1850; 1855 was one of a committee of 4 who was in charge of the July 4th celebration at Five Oaks, Washington Co, OR;  after his death in 1859 his widow married Henry B. Bones in 1860

"Alexander was born May 8, 1802, in New River, VA.  He was married to Sarah Luster on January 13, 1822, in Washington, Franklin County, Missouri.  From there they moved to Hemstead County, Arkansas. Zachary was one of   the most disliked persons in the immigration of 1843.  Charlotte Matheny Kirkwood gave him the pseudonym of "Zanders" because her comments on him were so condemning that she did not wish to embarrass Zachary's descendants.  She accused him of cruelty toward his negro slave Marth.  Zachary beat her with a chain for having awakened hungry in the middle of the night and cooked herself some flour and water.  [She was nursing at the time.] The five-year-old Charlotte witnessed the beating through the open flap of the tent.  He also was in the habit of threatening others, not doing his share of the common work, etc.  James Nesmith also related in his diary that Zachary had refused to give food to the man he hired to drive his wagon to Oregon, Walter Matney.  When Matney complained to Zachary that he was welching on their agreement, Zachary fired him, leaving Matney to his own fate without food in the wilderness.  Thereafter Matney had to rely on others for his food. Zachary was forever in rows with others in the train.  In one engagement by the  Snake River, he stabbed Mr. Wheeler with a knife. Nesmith rejoiced in his diary when Zachary was evicted from the wagon train.  Another time it is probably Zachary to whom Nesmith refers to as "Old Prairie Chicken." Zachary settled in Washington County, Oregon.  He died in Hillsboro, Washington County, Oregon, in April of 1859.  Sarah survived him by thirty-seven years." [information provided by Don Rivara. In addition to the present website his Sources included: [1] Into the Eye of the Setting Sun, by Charlotte Matheny Kirkwood, Pub. by the Hewitt-Matheny-Cooper Family Association, pp.11, 12, 15; [2] Our Proud Past, by Gail I. McCormick, self-published, pp. 14, 17, 19 [James Nesmith's Diary of 1843, extracted from the Oregon Historical Quarterly, December 1906]; [3] Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints Family Search on-line]

"To cross the Crow they dug out canoes of black walnut and lashed them together to form a raft. On this the wagons were put and ferried over. The Zachery family when near the western bank had the misfortune to have the raft sink, immersing the whole family as well as their provisions and all in the water. There were crowds of peaceable Indians on the shore who boldly plunged into the water to their rescue. A little boy about six years old was sitting on an ox-yoke which, being light, floated off with him. The river ran very rapid at this place and the little fellow perched on his frail raft hung on without a cry of fear. Several savages fleet offoot ran down the bank, and after getting a few rods ahead of the boy, went out and brought the young Moses ashore." [Alexander Blevins interview 1879]

Catherine ZACHARY (1838- ): d/o Alexander and Sarah (Luster) Zachary; Catherine was born 15 Sep 1838; she appears in the 1850 Milton City, Washington Co Census but additional information has not been found at this time

Cynthia Irene ZACHARY (1843-1878): m'd 1860 MCCOURT, Alex; d/o Alexander and Sarah (Luster) Zachary; Cynthia was born 26 Feb 1843 in MO. and married Alex  McCourt 28 Apr 1860 in Washington Co; the 1870 census shows the family living in Forest Grove, Washington Co; Alex was 13 years older than Cynthia; Cynthia died 01 May 1878 Wasco Co, OR;  Alex died after 1880

Daniel Luster ZACHARY (1830-1910): m'd 1862 DINWIDDIE, Martha Levica Hildreth; s/o Alexander and Sarah (Luster) Zachary; Daniel was born 26 Nov 1830; census records show Daniel in Milton City, Washington Co in 1845 and 1850; by 1900 he was living and farming in The Dalles, Wasco Co, the father of 13 children, 9 who were living; Daniel died at The Dalles 10 Jun 1910

H. Alexander ZACHARY (1840- ): s/o Alexander and Sarah (Luster) Zachary

Infant ZACHARY: see Martha Jane Zachary

John Quincy ZACHARY (1826-1896): m'd 1851 BROWN, Theresa; settled Washington Co; s/o Alexander and Sarah (Luster) Zachary; John Quincy was b. 23 Mar 1827 in Hempstead Co, Ark; he married Theresa Brown 02 Mar 1851 in Washington Co; John died 10 January 1896 at Roseburg, Douglas Co, OR

Lucetta Ann ZACHARY (1825-1899): m'd EMERICK, Solomon; m'd d/o Alexander and Sarah (Luster) Zachary
"Lucetta was was born January 28, 1825, in Hemstead County, Arkansas. On June 17, 1845, Lucetta married Solomon Emerick, also an immigrant of 1843, in Cornelius, Washington County, Oregon. She died August 22, 1899 in Fletcher, Lewis County, Idaho, and was buried in the Nez Perce Cemetery, Fletcher, Lewis Co, ID.  Solomon had died earlier that year. [information provided by Don Rivara. In addition to the present website his
Sources included: [1] Into the Eye of the Setting Sun, by Charlotte Matheny Kirkwood, Pub. by the Hewitt-Matheny-Cooper Family Association, pp.11, 12, 15; [2] Our Proud Past, by Gail I. McCormick, self-published, pp. 14, 17, 19 [James Nesmith's Diary of 1843, extracted from the Oregon Historical Quarterly, December 1906]; [3] Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints]

Martha Jane ZACHARY (1827- ):  
"Marth was the negro slave of Alexander Zachary and had an infant she was nursing. She was born November 3, 1827; so she was fifteen until reaching the end of the trail. Charlotte Matheny Kirkwood stated Marth was beaten with a chain by Alexander Zachary for sneaking food in the middle of the night. Mrs. Kirkwood changed the name of Zachary to "Zanders" in her book, no doubt out of  respect for the Zachary family."  [information provided by Don Rivara. In addition to the present website his Sources included: [1] Into the Eye of the Setting Sun, by Charlotte Matheny Kirkwood, Pub. by the Hewitt-Matheny-Cooper Family Association, pp.11, 12, 15; [2] Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints]

Mary A. E. ZACHARY (1822- ): d/o Alexander and Sarah (Luster) Zachary
"James Nesmith seems to have been fond of Mary, because he carved the young woman's name on Independence Rock on July 30, 1843, with that of Jane Mills.  Mary was born November 25, 1822, in Washington county, Missouri.  She died January 6, 1902, in Dayton, Columbia County, Washington." [information provided by Don Rivara. In addition to the present website his Sources included: [1] Into the Eye of the Setting Sun, by Charlotte Matheny Kirkwood, Pub. by the Hewitt-Matheny-Cooper Family Association, pp.11, 12, 15; [2] Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints]

Milley Jane ZACHARY (1833- ): m'd 1852 KIMSEY, Thomas; d/o Alexander and Sarah (Luster) Zachary; Milley Jane was b. 25 Apr 1833.  She is shown in the 1850 Milton City, Washington Co census still living with her parents.  Milley married Thomas Kimsey 11 Jan 1852 at the home of  Solomon Emerick.

Robert B. ZACHARY (1835- ): s/o Alexander and Sarah (Luster) Zachary; Robert was b. 06 Jul 1835 in Arkansas.  He is shown in the 1850 Milton City, Washington Co census living with his parents

Sarah ZACHARY (1837- ): d/o Alexander and Sarah (Luster) Zachary; Sarah was b. 15 Jun 1837;  it is not known at this time if she came in the 1843 emigration;  she is not shown in the 1850 Milton City, Washington Co census so it appears she died prior to that time

William L. ZACHARY (1824- ): s/o Alexander and Sarah (Luster) Zachary; Alexander was b. 10 Jan 1824.

*4) Louis ZINDEL: member of Fremont's second expedition;  "...had been nineteen years a non-commissioned officer of artillery in the Prussian army, and regularly instructed in the duties of his profession" was brought along to man cannon if necessary in Indian attack;  when party later split into two partys for exploration he stayed with Fremont

BIBLIOGRAPHY

 


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