Emigrants to Oregon Prior To 1839
compiled by Stephenie Flora
copyright © 1995

    

 

Prior to the first wagon emigration of 1842 there were many visitors to the Oregon Territory. Some adventurers came by ship, some were fur traders and mountain men that came overland and many were missionaries who came to the wilderness to minister to the native population. Below is a list of some of these individuals, the year in which they came and a brief explanation of who they were.  Additional information on some of these individuals may be found under the headings Explorers, Missionaries, French Canadians and Fur Traders. 

Family Histories of the French Canadians can be found at Ancestors of the French Canadians to Oregon prior to 1842 by Raymonde Gauthier

Family Histories of the Astorians can be found at Ancestors of the Astorians by Raymonde Gauthier

If you have an ancestor that came to Oregon prior to 1839 and you would like to have them included in this list, please contact me at the email address at the bottom of the site. The list is constantly being updated.  All additions and corrections are appreciated.

1811 Job AIKEN (-1811): Job was an employee and Astorian with the Pacific Fur Company.  He arrived on the Tonquin and was drowned at the mouth of the Columbia River while attempting a crossing.  He had been hired as a rigger and calker. "Messrs. Ebenerzer D. Fox and Job Aitken were both highly regarded by all."

1828 Jean P. ALEXANDER. dit Saunders (see Saunders)

1831 George T. ALLAN
(c1810-1892):   Allan was a well-known clerk with the Hudson Bay Company and in later years a storekeeper at Scottsburg and at Oregon City.  He was described as an affable, intelligient man `with a face like a coon'.  In his later years he lived at Cathlamet.  He wrote several accounts of his travels in early Oregon including "Copies of Letters and Journals of George T. Allan, Written at Fort Vancouver on the Columbia River, 1841." Typescript copy in files of Fort Vancouver National Historic Site, Vancouver, Washington. "Journal of A Voyage from Fort Vancouver . . . to York Factory, March 22—July 14, 1841." Typescript. In Provincial Archives of British Columbia, Victoria.

1836 John ALTZ: Altz was with the Whitmans and Spauldings in 1836.   A notation from Narcissa Whitman's diary states "Since we have been here we have made our tent. It is made of bedticking, in a conical form, large enough for us all to sleep under - viz.: Mr. Spalding and wife, Dr. Whitman and wife, Mr. Gray, Richard Tak-ah-too-ah-tis, and John Altz; quite a little family - raised with a centerpole and fastened down with pegs, covering a large circle. Here we shall live, eat and sleep for the summer to come, at least - perhaps longer."

1811 John ANDERSON: Anderson was a crew member and boatswain on the Tonquin.

1834 William Marshall ANDERSON (1807-1881): William Marshall Anderson was born June 24, 1807 in Louisville, Kentucky. He was an adverturer, a scholar and an educated lawyer.  Always restless, he was involved in numerous expeditions through out North America and Mexico.  At age 25 he joined William Sublette on an expedition of the Rocky Mountains.  In later years he became a surveyor in the state of Virginia and managed several farms in Ohio. William died January 7, 1881. [OHS MS; also in Frontier Omnibus, edited by A.J. Patrol.]

1834 Winslow ANDERSON: Anderson was a black man who lived on French Prairie and working for Ewing Young.  He was a close associate of James Baker listed below.

1830 Louis ANDRE (1792-bef 1843): m1. Angèle Unknown; Louis was listed on the books of the Hudson's Bay Company in 1830 as a middleman from Quebec, thirty-eight years of age, stationed at Ft. Vancouver.  In a letter written by McLoughlin in 1832 he was mentioned as a freeman.  He was a thought to be a métisse Iroquoise.  In some of the early church records he was listed as Pierre Akiéja and Pierre Akaissa and at times it appears he was listed as  Andre Louis.

183? John ANSON: John was an English employee of Hudson Bay Co.  He was loaned to the missionaries as an interpreter and accompanied Father DeVos on a mission to the mouth of the Columbia.  In 1836 a son, John, was born to him and Helene Chinook, after which the pair went separate ways.  When son, John, was baptized in 1840, Helene was the wife of Ignace Iroquois

1830 Amable ARCOUET (1802-1880): m'd 1839 Margaret Tchinouk. Amable entered the service of the Hudson's Bay Co as a middleman in 1823.  He was one of French Prairie settlers who went to CA for cattle in 1837.  He returned to CA again in 1849 for 3 months during the gold rush.  Amable settled on a claim north of Donald and became a naturalized citizen in 1851.  He was permanently blinded while helping blast a mill canal around the falls at Oregon City.  Amable was the father of  8 or 9 children with Chinook wife Marguerite including (Amable, Isaac, Jean, Leon, Marguerite, Lisette and Michel).  His marriage year was officially 1839 when he was married by arriving priests.  How long he was with Margaret prior to that is unknown but Amable Jr was born in 1831 to the couple. He is buried in the old St. Paul cemetery, Marion Co, OR

1813  Joseph ASHTON: Pacific Fur Co Employee; sailor and workman

c1818 Pierre ASHLEY: m'd Mary Ermatinger Part 1   Part 2

1830 Jean Baptiste AUBICHON (c1790-1879):  m1. 1839 Marie Tsalile; m2. 1847 Isabelle [indian]; originally from Sorel, Canada Aubichon settled in Marion County.  He died at Gervais and is buried in the St. Louis Cemetery, Marion Co, OR

183? Louis AUSANT (aka Aucent, Ossant, Aussent, Ozan, Ossin); see OZAN

1811 Edward AYMES: Aymes was a crew member and sailor on the Tonquin.  Aymes was a Welshman who missed returning to the boat on time at the Sandwich Islands.  When he attempted to reach the boat the next morning he was met by the Captain who beat him senseless and threw him into the water.  Friendly natives rescued him and pulled him into their boats.  Successive attempts to regain the ship proved useless and he was left at the islands.

182? James BAKER: m'd Betsy Tchinouk.  Baker was a canoeman out of Fort Vancouver by 1828.  He was at Ft. Walla Walla in 1829 and later, in the same year, on a trading vessel on the Columbia.  By 1841 he was living on French Prairie in close association with Winslow Anderson.  He was the father of (John, 1839) and Guillaume (1842).

1832 John BALL: Ball was a lawyer and teacher.  He graduated in 1820 from Dartmouth College.  He joined Wyeth's overland expedition in 1832 and was credited with establishing the first American farm at Champoeg.  Ball became disenchanted with primitive life and returned to NY in 1833.  He moved to Michigan where he spent remainder of his life. *1: MSS#195, 9pp letter, typescript in collection of OHS

183? Joseph BARNABE (1812- ): m'd 1838 Isabelle Boucher. Joseph setted on a claim near Broadacres in 1850 and became a citizen in 1851.  He married Isabelle Boucher (aka Elizabeth Boucher) in 1838.  He was the father of (Adélaide, Francois, Francois Xavier, Gideon, Joseph, Therese, Julienne, Christine and John).  He was one of the delegates from Champoeg county in 1846 to prepare pre-territorial memorial to Congress.  Joseph moved from the Willamette Valley to Wasco County, to Washington and to near Newman Lake in Idaho.  His wife died c.1860.

1829 James M. BATES (1809-1882): m'd 1847 Mrs Margaret Caldwell.  Bates went to sea in 1827 at which time he visited the Pacific Coast briefly.  In 1837 he returned to Oregon on the ship "Don Quixote"and joined the missionaries as a blacksmith.
"BATES, JAMES M.--
Born in Washington, D. C., in 1809 ; went to sea in 1827, and during the next year found his way to the Pacific Ocean, coming in a vessel owned in Boston. When the ship arrived on this coast an accident compelled it to put into Gray s Harbor to refit. This was in 1829. The ship s crew went in boats up the Chehalis River, and after putting to sea again they coasted southward, and wintered at Scappoose, where they "raised vegetables." In the spring of 1830 they coasted north to Sitka, and returning, entered the straits of Fuca. Took a load of horses to the Sandwich Islands, and sold them, and Mr. Bates proceeded on another ship to China, and thence home via the Cape of Good Hope. In 1887, still a sailor, Mr. Bates came to Oregon in the ship Don Quixote, and landing, joined the Missionaries as blacksmith, and has been in this valley ever since. Located at Jefferson, Marion County, in 1847, his present home. Was married in that year to Mrs. Margaret Caldwell, and has had one child Julia, by name, now the wife of Eli Vaughn, of Jefferson. Mrs. Bates died in 1882. Mr. Bates is, beyond a doubt, the earliest living pioneer of Oregon, if we consider his first coming to have constituted him a pioneer; and considering that he spent a considerable part of a year in Oregon, his claim to have become then a pioneer is well founded.Solomon Smith, who resided at Clatsop Plains, in 1872, claimed to have come to Oregon in 1832 with Wyeth ; but this date was several years subsequent to Mr. Bates arrival, so Smith could not be considered as the earliest living pioneer, which claim was put forth by some one on his behalf several years since." [History of the Willamette Valley by Herbert Lang p.594-5]

1837 Rachel BEARDSLEY ( -1851): m'd Alanson Beers. Rachel accompanied her husband to the NW in 1837 on the ship Diana.  She was described as quiet and docile.    Rachel died on the claim in 1851 leaving six children.

1812 Antoine BEAUCHEMIN:  Antoine was a Canadian voyageur and an overland Astorian.  It is thought he may have dropped out of the overland expedition.

183? Edouard BEAUCHEMIN: m'd Marianne WallaWalla.  Beauchemin was an employee of the Hudson's Bay Company during the 1830s and 1840s at Forts Vancouver and Walla Walla.  In 1855 he is living at Frenchtown in Walla Walla county with a wife and six children.  He was the father of (Paul, Alix, Charles, Baptiste, Justin, Louis and Norris.)  Edouard served for a short time in the Indian War of 1856 in Capt. Sidney Ford's company of Walla Walla Mounted Volunteers.  He was apparently close to Thomas Brancheau and Brancheau family legend states that Edouard and his wife were killed by Indians and their sons, Paul and Louis were raised by Thomas Brancheau and his wife.

1836 Jane BEAVER: m'd Rev. Herbert Beaver. Jane accompanied her husband to Fort Vancouver in 1836.  She was appalled at the domestic conditions in affect at the Fort (mainly the intermarriage of the men of the fort and the natives) and continued to hold herself aloof from the rest of the population until their departure in 1838.

1836 Rev. Herbert BEAVER: Rev. Beaver was chaplain at Fort Vancouver from 1836-1838.  He was described as a rather small person, with a light complexion and feminine voice.  He felt his clerical dignity was defiled by the gentlemen  at Fort Vancouver due to the domestic relations of the Hudsons Bay men with local native women.  The departure of the Rev. Beaver was hastened by an angry comfrontation with Dr. McLoughlin which almost resulted in a duel.

1837 Alanson BEERS (1800-1853): m'd Rachel Beardsley; m2. 1852 Sarah Unknown. Beers was born in Connecticut and became a blacksmith with the Methodist missionary reinforcements that arrived on the ship Diana in May 1837.  He was a member of the board of the Oregon Institute until his death;in 1853.  Beers participated in the establishment of a Provisional Government and was involved in forming the first military organization.  At the end of 1845 he helped lay out the town of Butteville with George Abernathy. He stayed on the farm after the mission was disolved.  He was listed as the father of six children but mention is made that he arrived with three children.  It is assumed he was either the father of seven children and one died or else he only arrived with two children as the birth dates of only two of the children are early enough  (Ellen c1834, Benjamin c1835, Abigar c1842, William c1844, Oliver c1846, Jonathan c1848).  Alanson died 20 Feb 1853and is buried at Lee Mission Cemetery, Salem, OR

1837 Benjamin BEERS (c1835- ): s/o Alanson and Rachel (Beardsley) Beers.  Arrived on the ship Diana in May 1837 with her parents.

1837 Ellen BEERS (c1834- ): d/o Alanson and Rachel (Beardsley) Beers.  Arrived on the ship Diana in May 1837 with her parents.

1837 Sarah Ann BEERS (1832-1854): m'd 1846 William Douglas Clay Gilliam.  d/o Alanson and Rachel (Beardsley) Beers.  Arrived on the ship Diana in May 1837 with her parents.

1818 Pierre BELEQUE (1793-1849): m'd 1839 Genevieve St. Martin.  Pierre joined the Northwest Fur Company in 1818 in New Caledonia.  He became an employee of the Hudson Bay Company in 1821 where he remained until his retirement about 1830.  At that time he took up a claim on French Prairie.  The claim included the old Henry House trading post and the surrounding pasture lands.  Beleque was described as mild and honest.  He was officially married to Genevieve in 1839 when the priests arrived but it is obvious from the ages of their children that they were together much earlier.  During the gold rush he and his eldest son, a boy of about 13, went to CA gold fields where he was reportedly quite successful.  On the journey home by ship, Pierre died and was buried at sea off the mouth of the Columbia.  Pierre was the father of eight children including: Sophie (1832), Pierre (1835), Jane (1837), Genevieve (1838), Esther (1840), Joseph (1843),  Jean Baptiste (1845), Cyperion (1848). The name is often seen spelled as Belleque.  His widow married Casimir Gardipie.

1811 George BELL: George Bell arrived with the Pacific Fur Company on the Tonquin.  He was a cooper.

18?? John BELL:

1813 Andre BELANGER: Northwest Company employee

1808 Registre BELLAIRE: Bellaire was part of the McClellan party to Bitterroot Valley in Sep 1807.  In 1808 he was engaged by Thompson to carry Salish House returns across the mountains.  By the winter of 1813-1814 he was working on the Willamette River as a free trapper in company with Astorians Alex Carson, John Day and William Cannon.   New Years Day 1814 he agreed to pay 180 pounds of beaver for the services of four Hawaiian trappers.  He traveled with his family up the Columbia River in the boat brigade of 1814 but dropped off at the mouth of the Walla Walla River to hunt in Snake County.

1813 Alexis BELLANT: Bellant was a North West Company employee.

1811 Antoine BELLEAU:  Belleau was a voyageur and Astorian with the Pacific Fur Company.  He arrived on the Tonquin.

1811 Jean Baptiste BELLEAU: Belleau was a voyageur and Astorian with the Pacific Fur Company.  He arrived on the Tonquin.

1818 BELLEQUE: See Beleque

1808 Pierre BERCIER ( -1830): m'd Emelie Finlay.  Pierre was a guide for David Thompson of the Northwest Company in 1808.  He was a boatman and horse keeper at Spokane House in 1813 and was with Peter Skene Ogden in the Snake River Country in 1824-26.  Pierre was the father of :  Marguerite (1817), Louis (1826), Cecile (1826), Basile (1835), Isabel and Pierre.  Bercier died about 1830 and his widow, Emelie Finlay m'd Simon Plamondon Sr.

1815 Edward Berland (1799- ): born 1799 in Canada; a Metis believed to have to come to the NW about 1815

1813 Julian BERNIER: Northwest Company employee

18?? Pierre BERNIER:

1813 Angus BETHUNE: Northwest Company employee

1837 Rev. Hiram BINGHAM (1789-1869): head of the Presbyterian mission in 1837.

18?? James BIRNIE (1800-1864): m'd Charlotte Beaulieu.  James Birnie was born in Aberdeen, Scotland and removed to Canada at the age of 16 years where he went to work for the Northwest Fur Company, and later, for the Hudson's Bay Company.  He was stationed at various posts in the Northwest, but he resided mainly at Astoria.  In 1845 he retired to Cathlamet where he donated part of his land claim for a Catholic church and cemetery.  He is buried in the Pioneer cemetery on his claim alongside his wife.  James was the father of Alexandre (1842), Caroline (1844), Archibald (1847), and Thomas Lowe (1851).

18?? Samuel BLACK: Black was born in Scotland and removed to Canada at the age of 17 years where he served with the XY Company, the Northwest Fur Company and the Hudson's Bay Company.  He was Chieft Trader at Ft. Walla Walla and Kamloops until 1837 when he was promoted to Chief Factor.  He remained at Kamloops on the Thompson River until his death at the hands of a disgruntled employee.

1838 Francis Norbert BLANCHET (1795-1883): Most Rev. Francis N. Blanchet was one of the earliest Catholic missionaries to the Northwest, arriving at Fort Vancouver in 1838 from Canada with Modeste Demers.   The pair traveled widely throughout Oregon and Washington, establishing churches along the way.  Blachet worked chiefly at Vancouver and in the country south of the Columbia.  He had the brick church at St. Paul built as his cathedral, having become Archbishop of Oregon.  He died in Portland in 1883 and was buried in the St. Paul parish cemetery. [see web page under heading Missionaries for additional information]

1813 Augustin BOISVERT: Northwest Company employee

1804 John Boley: Boley was member of Lewis and Clark's "Corp of Discovery".

1832 Capt. Benjamin BONNEVILLE (1796-1878): Bonneville was born in Paris, France and immigrated to America with his family in 1803.  He was educated at West Point.  In 1832 he was granted leave from the army to explore the region west of the Rockies.  In 1833 Bonneville he and Joseph Walker, with a party of about 40 men took an expedition into California.  Capt. Bonneville led parties to the Columbia River at least twice.  In 1835 he returned to Washington.  He also spent time at Ft. Kearny and Fort Vancouver.  In 1861 he retired but was recalled to duty during the Civil War.  In 1865 he was promoted to the rank of Brigadier General.  He died June 12, 1878.

1818 Jean Baptiste BOUCHARD (1800- ): m1. 1839 Louise Tchelis; m2. 1842 Angelique Okanaya. Bouchard was an engagé from LaPrairie, Montreal, Canada for the Hudson's Bay Company.  He came as a company boatman in 1818 and was a resident of Ft. Vancouver.  In some of the early church records he was also referred to as Olivier Bouchard.  He married Louise Tchelis in 1839 when the priests arrived in the area but they had been together many years before as they had an 8 year old son at the time of their marriage.  His first wife died in 1840.  He was the father of Jean Baptiste (c1832) and Cyrien (1844-1844)

1813 Charles BOUCHER: Pacific Fur Co Employee; overland Astorian

1813 Jean Baptiste BOUCHER (1759-1824): m'd Josephte desChudieres;  Jean Baptiste Boucher was past 50 years of age when he came to Fort George as an interpreter for the North West Fur  Co.  He took Josephte Kanhopitsa [desChaudieres] as his wife after her abandonment by John Clarke.   Boucher died while on an expedition to the Snake River country; "This morning, after an illness of 20 days, during which we carried him on a stretcher, died Jean Baptiste Boucher, an honest man."  His widow, Josephte married Joachim Hubert.

1813 Michel BOULLARD: Northwest Company employee; summerman

BOURGEAU FAMILY RESEARCHER:
183?
Joseph BOURGEAU (1807-1849): m'd Angele Lafantasie. Joseph was a brother of Sylvain listed below.  He joined the Hudson's Bay Company from l'Assumption, Quebec in 1829.  He was a boatman at Ft. Colville and accompanied Tolmie to the north in 1833.  Heron claimed to have had trouble with him for laziness and Tolmie claimed he was unreliable.  Joseph was the father of Marie Anne, Rose and Joseph.

183? Sylvain BOURGEAU (c1801-1871): m1. Josephte Tchinouk (c.1837); m2. 1839 Marie Mathlomat; m3. Angele Chehalis, widow of Jean Baptiste Perrault; Syvain was the brother of Joseph Bourgeau listed above.  Syvain was an engage with the Hudson's Bay Company and is listed as formerly being from Montreal, Canada.  He was the father of Betsy (1833) and Jean Baptiste (1837) by Josephte and Pierre (1838) by Marie Mathlomat.

1813 Joseph BOWITHICK: Northwest Company employee; hunter

1804 Pvt. William BRATTON (1784-1841):  Pvt. Bratton was a member of Lewis and Clark's "Corp of Discovery".  He reached the Pacific Coast  November 15, 1804.  Bratton became quite ill at one point and was subjected to various cures.  The final experiment which entailed the Indian method of inducing sweating and then immediate cooling in the river was credited with his final recovery.

1792 Lt. William R. BROUGHTON: Broughton accompanied Capt. George Vancouver on an exploring expedition that arrived in Oct 1792.

1811 Bazile BROUSSEAU: Pacific Fur Co Employee; overland Astorian

183? Louis BROWN: m'd Emilie Tchitaosh.  Brown was with Tolmie in 1833 on an expedition to the north.  He resided for a time at Ft. Colville where Father Demers noted that "a virtuous man by the name of Brown had taught the Christian prayers to the natives during our absence".  By 1850 he was living on French Prairie near St. Louis.  He was the father of Rose and Modeste.

1811 Pierre BRUGIERE: Pacific Fur Co Employee; overland Astorian

1811 Regis BRUGIERE aka Bruguier: "Mr. Pillet and McLennan arrived in a canoe sent from Mr. David Stuart and paddled by two of his men.  As passengers they brought an Iroquois family and Mr. Regis Bruguier, who Gabriel Franchere had known in Canada.  Mr. Bruguier came to hunt beaver and was supplied with traps and other necessary equipment."

1811 Louis BRULE: Brule was a voyageur and Astorian with the Pacific Fur Company.  He arrived on the Tonquin.

1820 Paschal CAILLE (1791-1854): dit Biscornet; m'd Louise Kawitchin; Caille came from Montreal to the Northwest in 1820 and settled on a claim north of Donald in 1845.  At the time of his death at St. Paul in 1854 he was entered in the Catholic Church records as Francois Paschal Biscornet.  He was the father of Francois (1833), Henriette (1835), Rose (1837), Moyse (1841)

182? Pierre CALDER (1799- ):  m'd Marguerite, d/o Chief Cassino; Calder was an apprentice at Ft. Vancouver as early as 1827 but disappears by 1839.  He may have died or simply left the area.  His wife later married Olivier Couturier. He was the father of Pierre (1835)

1811 William CANNON (1755-1852): Cannon was an overland Astorian.  It was claimed that he was a Revolutionary War soldier.  In 1814 he was working as a freeman trapper in 1814.  At one time he was a millwright for Hudson's Bay Co and by 1843 was running milling operations at Thomas McKay mill at Champoeg. During the exceptionally high water of 1843 he was rescued from his perch on a crate in the mill loft by neighbors who ran a canoe directly through a second story window.  His age at death is usually given as 99 rather than the 97 in the Church records.

1812 Jacque CARDINAL Sr.: Cardinal was a North West Company employee.

1813 Guillimone CARDINALLE.: Pacific Fur Co employee

1828 Angelique CARPENTIER (1828-1859): daughter of Charles Carpentier. She and her sister were placed in the Methodist Mission School near Salem for a few years when they were left motherless. After leaving the mission, Angelique seems to have had a number of lovers. At the time of her murder, at the hands of her current husband, Charles Roe, the Oregonian reported that "She had previously lived with a Negro and a Kanaka and had children by both."

1828 Charles CARPENTIER: not much is known of Charles.  His daughters were placed in the Methodist Mission School in 1838 after their were left motherless.

1828 Sophie CARPENTIER (1826- ): daughter of Charles Carpentier. She and her sister were placed in the Methodist Mission School near Salem for a few years when they were left motherless.

1812 Michel CARRIER: Carrier was an overland Astorian

1811 Alexander CARSON: Carson was an overland Astorian, a gunsmith and a freeman trapper.  He was a distant relative of Christopher "Kit" Carson. Alexander was the victim of  an Indian attack c1836 in Yamhill Co on Alec's Butte [which was later named after him].

1812 Martin H. CASS: Cass was an overland Astorian

1813 Antoine CAYALLE: Northwest Company employee

1838 Andre CHALIFOU Sr. (1789-1851): m'd Catherine Russie. Chalifou was a steersman on the brigade bringing Fathers Blanchet and Demers west in 1838.  At that time he brought his wife and several children with him.  At least one of his sons was drowned in a bateau accident at the Dalles.  There is a notation in the Vancouver Catholic Church Records that states "the body of Charles, aged 3 years who died 22 Oct 1838 was buried close to a cross planted at the Fort of the Lakes.  Another son, Michel, was born the end of September just prior to the death of Charles.  Andre was also the father of Rose (1836-1848), Lucie (1840-1849), Andre (1842-1880) settled with his family on French Prairie.

CHAMBERLAND FAMILY RESEARCHER
1837 Francois Dolphus CHAMBERLAND (1818-1888): aka Adolphus Chamberlain. m1. Julienne Watiece (five known children); m2. Louise Humperville (eleven children). Chamberland was born in Montreal, Canada and came with Dr. McLoughlin to Fort Vancouver in 1837.  He worked for Hudson Bay Co as tinsmith for a time and later settled on French Prairie.  Chamberland was literate and became a member of the Provisional Legislature in the late 1840s.  He was Secretary of the St. Paul School Board.  In adulthood some of his children used the English surname Chamberlain while others used the French Chamberland.  He was buried as Adolphe Chamberlain in the Old St. Paul Cemetery, St. Paul, Marion County, OR.

1804 Jean Baptiste CHARBONNEAU: s/o Toussaint and Sacajawea Charbonneau.

1804 Toussaint CHARBONNEAU (1789-1812):  Charbonneau was a guide, interpreter and member of Lewis and Clark's "Corp of Discovery"

1804 Toussaint CHARBONNEAU aka Pompey (1804-1866): s/o Toussaint and Sacajawea Charbonneau.  He was born Feb 11, 1804.

1813 Joseph CIRE: employee of Northwest Co.

1812 B. CLAPP: Clapp was an employee of the Pacific Fur Company that arrived on the second ship, Beaver.

1812 Antoine CLAPPINE: overland Astorian

1804 William CLARK (1770-1838):  Lewis and Clark Expedition

CLARKE FAMILY RESEARCHER 
1812 John CLARKE (1771-1852): m'd Josephte Kanhopitsa.  Clarke was a Pacific Fur Co Employee and an Astorian on the Beaver.  He joined the Hudson's Bay Company in 1814.  He was credited with building Fort Spokane near the North West Company post in that area.  Clarke was buried in Clarke Cemetery, Montreal, Canada (see book "Old Montreal" by his daughter, Adele Clarke)

1811 John COLES: Coles was a sailmaker and crew member on the Tonquin.  He drowned at the mouth of the Columbia River while attempting a crossing.

1804 Pvt. John COLLINS: Collins was a member of Lewis and Clark's "Corp of Discovery".  Collins received 100 lashes for disobedience.  He was credited with being involved in the making of salt at the saltworks set up by the expedition.

1804 Pvt. John COLTER (c1773-c1812): Colter was a member of Lewis and Clark's "Corp of Discovery".  On return trip he left with traders on the Missouri near Omaha, NE and in 1807 went on to explore portions of the Yellowstone.   He was considered by Lewis and Clark to be a loyal and valued member of the expedition.

1835 Charles COMPO: Compo was an interpreter for the missionary, Samuel Parker.  He settled near Waiilatpu soon after he came to the mission with Parker in 1835.

1811 George CONE: Cone was a Pacific Fur Co Employee and an overland Astorian

1838 James CONNER: Conner was employed by both the Hudson's Bay Company and the American Fur Company.  He and his Nez Perce wife and baby arrived with the Missionary party in 1838.

1813 Michel COTENOIR:  m'd Marie Ketse.  Cotenois was formerly of Saint Cuthbert, Montreal, Canada.   Michel worked for the Northwest Fur Company and as a freeman. Father of Lisette (1822), Edouard (1832), David (1837), Marie (1840)

1811 Joseph COTE: (aka Cotte) Cote was a Pacific Fur Co Employee and an overland Astorian.

1826 Joseph COURNOILLE Sr. (1803- ): m'd Therese Spokane. Cournoille was born at Sorel, Canada and joined the Northwest Fur Company in 1819.  He accompanied Chief Trader Samuel Black to the Rocky Mountains in 1824 and was described as "a real rough and tumble.. he works with hand and foot, tooth and nail at the line".  In 1826 when he was transferred to the Columbia District.  He was one of those sent to the Umpqua to recover Jed Smith's goods and was with Work on the Snake River in 1831-32.  After that time he became a free trapper, chiefly with Laframboise.  Although he had a land claim on which he paid taxes in 1844 he did not live to receive a patent on it.  His wife was Therese Spokane, widow of Joseph Grenier, who had drowned at the Dalles in 1830.

1812 Ross COX:  Cox was a Pacific Fur Company employee and a clerk under both the Astorians and the Northwest Fur Company.  He arrived on the ship Beaver. In 1817 he returned to his native Ireland.

CRAIG FAMILY RESEARCHER:

1829 William CRAIG (1807-1869):

1837 James CRAIGIE (1813-1895): m'd 1845 Mary Ann Dejarlais.  Craigie was an employee of the Hudson's Bay Company at Ft. Boise.  Although he was in the area periodically he did not come to settle until around 1850.

1838 Edouard CRETE: m'd Sophie Boucher; s/o Baptiste and Marie Anne (Laur) Crete of Canada.  Edouard was a French Canadian voyageur who came by canoe route across Canada in 1838.  He was employed as master of canoe and bateau fleet for Hudsons Bay Co.  He brought the Spalding and Whitman survivors down to Fort Vancouver after Whitman Massacre for Peter Skene Ogden.  In 1849 he retired to Crates Point below the Dalles, raising stock and transporting emigrants down river in partnership with Charles Lefeve of Pendleton. He was the father of 14 children.

1804 Pvt. Peter CROISETTE:  aka Cruzat, Crouzat, Crusatte, Crousatte.  His real name was probably Croisette or Croixette.  Cruzatte was a member of Lewis and Clark's "Corp of Discovery" and the expedition fiddler.  He was a French-Canadian boatman and the chief waterman of the expedition.  He accidentally shot Capt. Lewis Aug 11, 1806 while out hunting.  Was described as "nearsighted and has the use of but one eye, his is an attentive and industrious man and one whome (sic) we both have placed the greatest confidence in dureing (sic) the whole rout (sic)>"

1811 Ramsay CROOKS (1787- ): Ramsay Crooks was a Scotsman who emigrated to North America in 1803 at the age of 16.  He was a clerk at Mackinac for three years and then went to St. Louis where he joined Robert McClellan as  a partner in trading expeditions.  In 1810 he joined Astor's Pacific Fur Company and came overland in 1811.  Ramsay Crooks and John Day fell behind the main party in the Snake River country in the winter of 1811-12.  They had terrible experiences, but eventually got through the snow of the Blue Mountains and fell in with friendly Walla Walla Indians.  They were then directed down the Columbia river to meet their companions when in the vicinity of the mouth of John Day River the men were met by hostile Indians who robber them of all they had, including their clothes.  They were rescued when they met Robert Stuart's party descending the Columbia River.  After the Pacific Fur Company sold he remained in Astor's employee and was in charge of the American Fur Company activities from 1822-1834.  He became a successful American entrepreneur.

1804 John DAME (1784- ): Dame was a member of Lewis and Clark's "Corp of Discovery"

18?? Thomas DAVIS: by 1839 Catherine Towaka had married Andre St. Martin.  In the records at that time she is listed with a daugter, referred to as both Catherine and Francoise, aged 2, natural daughter of Thomas Davis and Catherine Towaka.  It is unknown at this time if Thomas had died or simply left the area.  It is noted that a Thomas Davis is an emigrant of 1843 so it may be that he returned east and emigrated again in 1843.

1811 John DAY:  John Day was a Virginia backwoodsman and an employee of the Pacific Fur Co.  He was a freeman trapper and hunter and an overland Astorian.  He and Ramsay Crooks fell behind the main party in the Snake River country in the winter of 1811-12.  They had terrible experiences, but eventually got through the snow of the Blue Mountains and fell in with friendly Walla Walla Indians.  They were then directed down the Columbia river to meet their companions when in the vicinity of the mouth of John Day River the men were met by hostile Indians who robber them of all they had, including their clothes.  At the time, Robert Stuart's party was descending the Columbia and rescued them.    According to some reports, Day went quite insane at Astoria c1814 and died while being returned east.  Other reports stated he died in 1820 in Snake River country.

182? John DEASE (1783-1830):   Dease was a brother of the better known Peter Warren Dease, Arctic explorer.  John Dease was a Chief Trader in the Northwest and Hudson's Bay Companies, stationed variously at Rainy Lake, Fort Alexander, Fort Nez Perce and Flathead Post.  He died at the Dalles in 1830 while enroute to Fort Vancouver.  Napoleon Dease was his son by a Flathead woman, probably born during his father's years in the Colville District.  He also had a daughter, Margaret, born in 1818.  It may have had the same mother, but this is not known.

1805 Philippe DEGRE: Degre was a member of the Lewis and Clark Expedition of 1805 but apparently dropped out along the way, working his way west later; as if in amazement at his great age, Father Demers wrote at the bottom of the page in the register, "Mon Dieu, Mon Dieu!" at his death at age 108 years

182? Joseph DELARD (1792-1869): m1. c1820 Lisette Shuswap; m2. Marie Poirier; Joseph Delard came from Sorel, Canada, spending many years in the North West with the Hudson's Bay Companies.  In 1828 Governor Simpson mentioned him at Kamloops as "an able good Steersman and an active hand with the horses", real praise from the critical governor.  Joseph retired in 1832 to a claim near Fairfield on French Prairie.   Joseph was the father of 13 children including: Antoine (1838), Augustin "Quine" (1827), Basile (1833), Catherine (c1821), Marie Anne (1836), Pierre dit Delore (c1824)

1811 Joseph DELAUNAY: Delaunay was a Pacific Fur Co Employee, a freeman trapper and an overland Astorian

1811 Pierre DELAUNAY: Delaunay was a hunter for the Pacific Fur Company and an overland Astorian

1811 Jean Baptiste DELORME:  Delorme was a Pacific Fur Co Employee and an overland Astorian

1838 Modeste DEMERS: Catholic priest; arrived at Fort Vancouver in 1838 from Canada with Francis Norbert Blanchet; later became Bishop Demers.

183? Pierre-Narcisse DEPOT (11799-1868): m1. Susanne Tchinook; m2. 1839 Marguerite Clamak; m3. Lisette (Elizabeth) Gagnon.  Pierre was born 23 Dec 1799, St.. Antoine sur Richelieu, QC.  He was the s/o Joseph-Louis and Suzanne (Brault) Depot. (Source: PRDH database, U. of Montréal, Morin Ed.). He appears to be the last of 14 children born to the couple. Signs a first contract with North-West Trading Co. in Montréal (departure June 1st 1820) gave residence as St-Roch de l'Assomption (today St-Roch de l'Achigan, parents had moved there from St-Antoine between 1799 and 1807). Signs a second contrat with Hudson's Bay in 1821 for Snake Country Expeditions.  www.gov.mb.ca/chc/archives/hbca/biographical/d/depot_pierre.pdf   Pierre was the father of Pierre (1835) and Joseph? (1837) from first marriage; Harriette? (1842), Adelaide (1843) and  Etienne (1847) from second marriage (Margaret died January 1850 leaving three children, one of whom died) ; Catherine (1859) and Marcelline (1868) from last marriage.   Pierre settled on a donation land claim in Marion county.  [information supplied by Jacques Orsali with the help of Pierrette Dépot]

183? Antoine DESCHAMPS (c1804- ): m'd Marie (described in church records as Marie Nez Perces, Marie Nesqualys, Louise Chehalis, Aloise Cowlitz--may or may not all be the same woman); s/o Francois and (a Cree woman) Deschamps.  Antoine was a brother of Pierre.  Deschamps was listed as an engage for the Hudson's Bay Company.  He was the father of David (1839), Jean Baptiste (1845) and Marie (1849)

183? Baptiste DESCHAMPS: Antoine and Pierre Deschamps were brothers from Red River.    It is unknown if Baptiste was also related to these two DesChamps.

1838 Pierre DESCHAMPS ( -c1868): m'd 1853 Marie Oskanha (d/o Louis Oskanha dit Monique). s/o Francois and (a Cree woman) Deschamps. Pierre was a Metis from the Red River region and was a brother to Antoine.   It is unknown if Baptiste was also related to these two DesChamps.  Pierre was among the party bringing the priests to Vancouver in 1838 and was one of those who was able to save himself in the upset of the bateau in the rapids.  Pierre was the father of Christine, Odile, Chloris, Odile (II), Rosalie, Pierre, Celestine and Jean Ephram.

183? Joseph Frederic DESPARD (1799- ): m'd Lisette Tchinouk.  Joseph was from Montreal, Canada and married Lisette at Vancouver in  1839 when the priests arrived.  By that time they were the parents of Joseph 12yrs, Marie Anne 5yrs, Rose 3yrs and Marguerite, 8 mos.  By 1850 Joseph was living on a donation land claim in Marion County.  Lisette died in 1851.

1811 Pierre DETAYE:  Detaye was an overland Astorian

1811 Louis DINNELLE (aka Dinelle): Dinnelle was a Pacific Fur Co Employee and an overland Astorian

1838 Mary Augusta DIX (1810-1881): m. 1838 William Henry GRAY; Mary's husband was a Presbyterian missionary working with the Whitmans.  She died in 1881 at Clatskanie, Oregon.  Her and her husband were originally buried at Astoria but 25 years later their bodies were removed and buried at Wailatpu next to the Whitmans  where they had begun their missionary work.

183? Jean Baptiste DOBIN ( -1849): m'd Nancy (woman of the Dalles); Dobin was an employee of the Hudson's Bay Company at Fort Vancouver during the 1830s and later held land south of Champoeg, where he built a "big long" log cabin according to his step grandson, Thomas Lachance.  Half  was on either side of the line between his claim and that of his wife.  Both went to the gold fields, where Jean Baptiste died 26 Sep 1849 and was buried by Father Delorme.  His wife Nancy returned home but died almost at once 23 May 1850.

183? David DOMPIERRE ( -bef 1850): m'd 1838 Marguerite Souilliere; Dompierre was a carpenter with the Hudson's Bay Company at Fort Vancouver.  He was the father of Marie (1834), David (1837), Joseph (1831) and Julienne (1839)

1811 Jean Baptiste DORION (c1815-1850): m'd 1845 Josephine Walla Walla (Cayuse). s/o Pierre and Marie (Laguivoise) Dorion.  CCR : Dorion may have been one of the children accompanying his parents on the overland trip of the Hunt party.  As Pierre Dorion was killed in 1814, Jean Baptiste's birth must date near or prior to that time.  His mother was known as "Madame Dorion" and was widely respected.  He was the father of at least seven recorded children-Denise, Pierre, Genevieve, David, Philomene, Joseph and Marianne.  After the death of Dorion about 1850, his six-year-old son, David, was reared by his father's half-sister, Marguerite Vagnier Gobin.

1811 Pierre DORION ( -1814): m'd Marie Laguivoise (aka Marie Ohioise).  Pierre was a Pacific Fur Co Employee, an interpreter and an overland Astorian.  He was killed by Indians in 1814 in the Reed party massacre.  His wife and children barely escaped.  Marie became known as "Madam Dorion" and was widely respected.  

1823 David DOUGLAS:  Douglas was a British botanist who spent time exploring and documenting the flora and fauna in the territory from 1823-1827.

1830 Sir James DOUGLAS (1803-1877): m'd Amelia Connolly. Douglas was educated in Scotland.  He was a clerk for the Northwest Fur Company and then for the Hudson's Bay Company.  He came to Fort Vancouver in 1830 and by 1834 had risen to the position of Chief Trader and in 1839 became Chief Factor.  In 1849 he was transferred to Vancouver Island and in 1859 became Governor of British Columbia.  He was knighted in 1863 and retired in 1864.  He was the father of  Jane (1839), Marguerite (1846-1848) and Rebecca (1849)

1837 Mr. and Mrs. DOUGLAS: arrived on the first of at least two ships to Oregon in 1837 

1837 Susan DOWNING (1816- ): m1. 1837 Cyrus Shepard; m2 1841 Joseph Whitcomb.  Susan was a member of reinforcements sent to aid Jason Lee and the Willamette Mission.  She arrived in May 1837 and married Cyrus Shepard the same yearl, in a joint ceremony with Jason Lee and Anna Maria Pittman and Charles Roe and Nancy, an Indian girl. After the death of her first husband she remarried and returned east where her husband died shortly after arrival.  Susan was described as "small, attractive, well liked, and with a keen sense of humor"

1830 Alexander DRIPS: (sometimes spelled Draeps);  Alexander had been trapper and trader since the 1820.  He was a founder, with Henry Vanderburgh, of the American Fur Company.  In 1839 he accompanied Sutter to the Willamette Valley. After Fontenelle's death in the winter of 1839-40, Joe Walker became his unofficial partner. The American Fur Company was disbanded at Rendezvous in 1840 but Drips (in company with Bridger and Carson) continued to travel various trails as a guide and trader.

1804 George DROUILLARD:  aka Drewyer. Drouillard was a hunter, interpreter and member of Lewis and Clark's "Corp of Discovery".  After returning from the expedition, Drouillard joined with Manual Lisa to trade with the Indians.  Drouillard was a "half-breed"; the Indian side of him made him the best hunter and woodsman of the party; he was a crack shot, and simply invaluable.  Lewis praised Drouillard highly: "A man of much merit; he has been peculiarly useful from his knowledge of the common language of gesticulation, and his uncommon skill as a hunter and woodsman; those several duties he performed in good faith and with an ardor which deserves the highest commendation.  It was his fortune to have encountered on various occasions with either Capt. Clark or myself all the most dangerous and trying scenes of the voyage in which he uniformly acquitted himself with honor.  He has served the complete term of the whole tour and received only 25 Dollars pr. month and one ration pr. day, while I am informed that it is not unusual for individuals in similar employment to receive 30 Dollars pr. Month..."

DUBREUIL FAMILY RESEARCHER
1811 Jean Baptiste DUBREUIL ( - 1849): m'd 1839 Marguerite Yougoulhta (Chinook).  Dubreuil was from Saint Anne, Montreal, Canada.  He was an overland Astorian and was referred to as both a hunter and a boatman.  He settled with his wife on French Prairie but during the gold rush went to CA where he died in the gold fields.  His widow married Charles Plante.  He was the father of Francois (1844), Isaac (1842), Jean Baptiste (1836-1839), Michel (c1834-1839), Sophie (1839-1912) and  Therese (1846)

1811 Francois DUCHOQUETTE  (1819-1863): aka Dechouquette; m'd Marie Marguerite Okanogan.  Duchoquette was a Pacific Fur Co Employee, and an overland Astorian.  He served off and on as postmaster at Fort Okanogan.  He was said to be an intelligent man, was able to read and write and was a "pretty good bookkeeper".   He was also known as a man much addicted to drink.

1811 Andre DUFRESNE: Andre was a Pacific Fur Co Employee, a hunter and an overland Astorian

1812 Jean Baptiste DUPATE (c1793-1853): dit Desportes, McKay, McKie, McRoy; Dupate appears to have arrived at Fort George with the North West Company.  He worked for a time with the Hudson's Bay Company but was also referred to as a freeman.  He was a noted marksman.  Dupate retired to French Prairie above Champoeg where he resided with several wives and a number of children.  His various descendants moved to the Umpqua region.

1813 Nicholas DUPUIS:  Dupuis was reportedly at Astoria during this time period, returned east where he married.  He emigrated with his family in 1853.

1833 George W. EBBERTS (1810- ): Ebberts was an employee of the American Fur Co when he first visited the Oregon Territory in 1833.  He left and returned to the region again in 1839
 
"EBBERTS, GEORGE W.--Born in Bracken County, Kentucky, in 1810; went to the Rocky Mountains in 1829 in the employ of the American Fur Company. Visited Oregon first in 1833 and again in 1839. Lived for a year in Marion County, but removed then to his present residence in Washington County, near Hillsboro. Married in 1838. Children: John, Anna and Alfred." [History of the Willamette Valley by Herbert Lang p.595]

1834 Philip Leget EDWARDS (1812-1869): Edwards was a native of Kentucky. In 1834, at age 22, he joined the Jason Lee expedition to Oregon as a lay helper. He taught school at Champoeg in 1835, and in 1836 went to California with other  settlers to obtain cattle for the mission. In March 1838, he returned to the states with Jason Lee. He entered politics in MO and was elected to the Legislature.  Edwards practiced law at Richmond, MO until 1850 when he emigrated overland to CA.  He was elected to the CA state Legislature in 1855.  Ebberts died at Sacramento, CA in 1869 *1: MSS#235, 11pp letter, handscript and typescript in manuscript collection at OHS.

1838 Rev. Cushing EELLS (1810- ): m. Myra Fairbanks was a Congregationalists appointed by the American Board of Commissioners of Foreign Missions.  Along with Rev. Elkanah Walker, he established a mission at Tshimakain (Chemakane) near Ft. Colville, WA.  He was described as solemn and pious.  He opened a school at Forest Grove 1850-51 and also founded  Whitman College. *1: MSS#1218, letters, typescript in collection at OHS.

1812 George EHNINGER:  Ehninger was a Pacific Fur Company employee and a nephew of John Jacob Astor.  He arrived on the ship Beaver.

ERMATINGER FAMILY RESEARCHER
1824 Edward ERMATINGER (1797-  ): Edward was born in 1797 on the island of Elba, the s/o Lawrence Edward Ermatinger and an unnamed Italian woman.  He was educated in England and both he and his brother, Francis, (see Francis bio for additional information) were appointed clerks in the service of the Hudsons Bay Company in 1818.  On July 21, 1825 Edward and his brother left York Factory for the Columbia district, where both had been appointed to serve as clerks.  Edward became Chief Clerk at Ft. Vancouver. He retired from the fur trade in 1830

1824 Francis ERMATINGER (1798-1858): m'd 1858 Catherine Sinclair. Francis was born in Lisbon, Estre Madura, Portugal in 1798, the s/o Lawrence Edward Ermatinger and an unnamed Italian woman.  He was educated in England and both he and his brother, Edward, were appointed clerks in the service of the Hudson's Bay Company in 1818.  They sailed from Gravesend on May 18 and arrived at York Factory on August 14.  On Sep 8, Francis left York Factory for the Severn district, where he was stationed during his first years of service.   July 21, 1825, Francis and his brother left York Factory for the Columbia district, where they both had been appointed to serve as clerks. Francis was described in 1828 by Governor Simpson as "a stout active boistrous fellow who is a tolerable Clerk and Trader and qualified to be useful where bustle and activity without any great exercise of judgment are necessary.". Frances spent almost 40 years in the service of the company, mostly on the Pacific Coast and was promoted to chief trader in 1841. Francis was elected first treasurer of the new Provisional Government, a post which he kept until his retirement, when he return to Canada.  He died in 1858 at St. Thomas, Canada and was buried in St. Thomas, Parish Cemetery, Ontario, Canada. Francis Ermatinger Family Part 1   Part 2    Part 3  Part 4  by Chalk Courchane

1838 Myra FAIRBANKS (1805-1878): m. Rev. Cushing Eells.  d/o Joshua and Sally Fairbanks.  Husband was a Congregationalist missionary that arrived at Whitman Mission in the winter of 1838-39 as part of reinforcements.  Myra was described as "frail and nervous". *1: MSS#1218 62pp journal handscript in collection at OHS.

1811 Russell FARNHAM: Farnham was a clerk and an Astoria with the Pacific Fur Company.  He arrived on the Tonquin.

1830 Dominique FARRON (1795- ):  m'd 1839 Josephte Tlalam.  Farron came from Montreal to Fort Vancouver.  For some years he worked at the Cowlitz Farm and in the 1860 Clark county census he was listed as a tailor.  His wife died in 1844 and by 1850 Farron was farming in Lewis County.  He served, with several of his sons, in Peer's Company of Cowlitz Rangers during the Indian War of 1855-56.  Farron was the father of Narcisse (1832), Amable (1834),  Dominique (1837), Elizabeth (1839) and Louise (1833)

1830 Antoine FELIX (1805-1861): m1. Marguerite des Chaundieres; m2. Marie Archange Hubert.  Antoine was a canoeman from Montreal, working mainly out of Fort Colville.  He retired to French Prairie in 1843, taking up a claim at St. Louis.  Antoine was the father of Emmanuel, Antoine, Francois, Marguerite, Guillaume and Pierre.  Most of his children died young with the exception of Marguerite and Emmanuel.

1811 Prisque FELIX:  Prisque was a Pacific Fur Co employee and an overland Astorian.

1811 Adam FICHER: Ficher was a crew member and sailor on the Tonquin.

1804 Pvt. Joseph FIELD (1772-1807):  Joseph Fields was a member of Lewis and Clark's "Corp of Discovery". "Joseph and Reuben Fields, brothers; two of the `nine young men from Kentucky'.  Two of the most active and enterprising young men who accompanied us, it was their peculiar fate to have been engaged in all the most dangerous and difficult scenes of the voyage in which they uniformly acquitted themselves with much honors." During the expedition he was bitten by a snake and attacked by a bear but survived both ordeals.  He was credited in the journals as making salt at present day Seaside, OR.

1804 Pvt. Reuben FIELD (1771-1823):  Reuben Fields was a member of Lewis and Clark's "Corp of Discovery".
"Joseph and Reuben Fields, brothers; two of the `nine young men from Kentucky'.  Two of the most active and enterprising young men who accompanied us, it was their peculiar fate to have been engaged in all the most dangerous and difficult scenes of the voyage in which they uniformly acquitted themselves with much honors."  In a skirmish with Indians visiting the camp Reuben killed one of them.

FINLEY FAMILY RESEARCHER
1808 Jacques Raphael "Jocko" FINLAY (1768-1828): s/o James Finlay (a Nor'wester) and a Chippewa woman.  Finlay came west as a scout and trail blazer for David Thompson in 1806.  He had a reputation for great courage and resourcefulness.  He was a good linquist and was well educated.  Several well-drawn maps of the Rocky Mountains are believed to be the work of Jacco, signed "Jean Finlay". After the merger of the Northwest Company and Hudson's Bay Company he became a freeman.  As a clerk for Hudson's Bay Company he helped build Spokane Housein 1810.  After his death he was buried, at his request, under one of the bastions there.   Jacco had 20 or more children who all were involved in the development of the Pacific Northwest (note: most of the children spelled their name as Finley)

c1808 Xavier FINLAY arrived prior to 1808.  He was an engage and voyageaur for the Hudson's Bay Company

182? Thomas FITZPATRICK: Fitzpatrick was a member of the Rocky Mountain Fur Co.  He was known to the Indians as "Bad Hand".  By 1823 he had joined a party led by Gen. William Ashley to mountains to trap beaver.  In later years he was a guide for various emigrant parties heading west.  He was appointed Indian agent for the in Upper Platte and Arkansas Indians in 1864.  Matthieu described Fitzpatrick as "a tall, spare, gray haired Irishman of gentlemanly bearing, at home anywhere in the mountains or on the prairies, but very taciturn."

182? Moses FLANAGAN: Flanagan was a Pacific Fur Co employee and a bookbinder

184? Magnus FLETT was born c1821 in Scotland and is believed to be the younger brother of Thomas Flett mentioned below.  His year of arrival in the Northwest is unknown at this time.  He is found living in the same area as Thomas throughout the various census records.  He died near Addy, Washington in January 1899.

1834 Thomas FLETT was born c1814 Orkney Islands, Scotland.  He joined the Hudson's Bay Company in 1833 and served with them in various capacities.  Thomas m1. Nancy Kootenay, by whom he had one daughter.  He  m2. Lizette Haibart/Hubert 19 June 1851 Oregon City, Clackamas Co, OR.  After serving at Ft. Colville for many years he retired to a farm near Woodburn, Marion County, OR.  By 1860 he is back living near Ft. Colville, Stevens Co, WA where it is assumed he lived out the remainder of his life.  He is found living there through the 1880 census and no mention can be found of his death.

1804 Sgt. Charles FLOYD ( -1804): Floyd was a member of Lewis and Clark's "Corp of Discovery".  He died 20 Aug 1804 near present Sioux City. "Sgt Charles Floyd seized with a bilious colic and died.  He died with a composure which justified the high opinion we had formed of his firmness and good conduct.  He was buried on top of the bluff with the honors due to a brave soldier; the place of his interment was marked by a cedar post, on which his name and the day of his death were inscribed.   A small river about 30 yards wide was named Floyd's river." [William Clark journal]*1: MSS#1508, 30pp journal in OHS collection;

1830 Lucien FONTENELLE ( -c1837): Fontenelle replaced Vanderburgh, after his death, in 1832 as Draep's (Drips) partner.  He died the winter of 1837-38; .

182? Louis FORCIER (1808- ): m1. ; m2. 1839 Catherine Canaman (a Chinook woman); Forcier came from St. Hyacinthe, Canada and by 1829 was listed as a canoeman at Fort Vancouver.  He was the father of Louis, Olive and Dominique by his first wife and Alexis, Rose, Gedeon, Francois and an unnamed daughter by his second wife.

1810 Ebenezer D. FOX ( -1811): Fox was First Mate on the Tonquin.  He was drowned during a crossing at the mouth of the Columbia River. "Messrs. Ebenerzer D. Fox and Job Aitken were both highly regarded by all.  Mr. Fox, who had already made a journey to the Northwest, could have rendered important services to the company...."

1811 Gabriel FRANCHERE (1786-1863): m1. 1815 Sophie Routhier (d. 1837); m2. Mrs. Charlotte Prince. Gabriel was a clerk with the Pacific Fur Company who arrived on the Tonquin in 1811.  He later became Astor's Agent for the American Fur Company in Montreal.  When the company sold in 1834, Ramsay Crooks became president of the newly former company and chose Franchere to take over management of the key agency at Sault Ste. Marie.  Gabriel was the father of Evariste, Henriette, Matilda, Sophis and Celina.   Gabriel died 12 Apr 1863 at St. Paul, MN while visiting his stepson, John S. Prince.  He is buried in the Calvary Cemetery, St. Paul, MN.

1812 Simon FRASER (1776-1862): s/o Simon and Isabel (Grant) Frazer. Fraser was a North West Company employee.

1804 Pvt. Robert FRAZIER ( -1837): Frazier was a member of Lewis and Clark's "Corp of Discovery".

1811 Francois FRIPAGNIER: Fripagnier was listed as an overland Astorian.

1828 Lucien "Luc" GAGNON (1807-1872): m'd Julia Gregoire. Lucien settled on French Prairie where he raised his family.  His probate in 1872 lists his heirs as Emerance Groslouis, dtr, 35, Douglas Co; Margaret Morin, dtr, 34, Umatilla Co; Hellen Levien (Lemery), dtr, 32, Marion Co; Annie Belleque, dtr, 29, Douglas Co; Antoine Gagnon, son, 27, Marion Co; Dorilda Gagnon, dtr, 17, Marion Co.  He was buried in St. Louis Cemetery, St. Louis, Marion Co, OR

1813 Joseph GAILLOUX:  Gailloux was an employee of the Northwest Co.

GALE FAMILY RESEARCHER
1834 Joseph GALE (1800- ): m'd Eliza Nez Perce, who was the daughter of Old Chief Joseph.  He traveled at least part way with the Wyeth Expedition in 1832.  Joseph Gale was an American settler who was born at Baltimore, MD.  He settled in Washington county and built the first flourmill and sawmill near Forest Grove.  He had settled in CA and came to the Willamette Valley in 1834.  He later moved back to California.

1811 Jean Baptiste GARDIPIE: Gardipie was a Pacific Fur Co employee, a hunter and an overland Astorian.

1804 Sgt. Patrick GASS (1771-1870): m'd 1831 Maria Hamilton.  Gass was a member of Lewis and Clark's "Corp of Discovery".  During the expedition he kept a diary that was later published.  He served as a carpenter, a boatsman, an occasional hunter and an experienced horseman.  In his earlier years he was described as a "young man having a dark complexion, gray eyes and dark hair".  At eighty-seven he was described by biographer Jacob as "in stature, somewhat low, never having in his best estate, exceeded five feet seven, stoutly and compactly built, broad-chested and heavy limbed, yet lean, sprightly and quick of motion...remarkably alert".  He returned to Wellsburg, Virginia (later West Virginia) after the expedition disbanded.  At the age of 59 he married Maria Hamilton, a young girl not more than sixteen.  She bore him seven children before dying of measles in 1847.  Gass was the father of Benjamin, William, James, Sara (Sallie Bowman), Annie (Smith) and Rachel (Brierley) and Elizabeth who died at age 9 mos.  He died at age 99 and was buried was buried in Shrimplin's Cemetery, Brooke County.  In 1920 Patrick and Maria's remains were moved to the Brooke County Cemetery at Wellsburg, WV.

GAY FAMILY RESEARCHER
1835
George Kirby GAY (1810-1882): m'd Louisa Hare (Chehalis, Worley); m'd. Mary Manson; m'd Mary Ann RUBIDOW.  In 1821Gay apprenticed as a sailor.  He was in CA in 1833, where he deserted ship and joined Ewing Young in a trapping expedition to the north.  Coming overland in 1835 to the Willamette Valley with William Bailey and John Turner, he was involved in an Indian attack that killed several of his companions.  Gay was a member of the party of 1836 sent to CA to secure cattle for the Champoeg settlement.  He built the first brick house in Oregon and owned land in Polk and Yamhill Co.  A granite block with a bronze marker, noting George Gay's contributions to the provisional government of 1843 was erected by the DAR in May 1931. It is located on the Salem-Dayton Highway (state 221) at milepost 9.60. George Kirby Gay old brick house contributed by Van Atkins
"GAY, GEORGE.--Born in Gloucestershire, England, in 1810; at the age of eleven years he was apprenticed as a sailor and followed the sea for twelve years, and in 1833 found himself at the port of Monterey, in California. Here he deserted his ship and joined Ewing Young in a trapping expedition northward. In 1835 he came overland to the Willamette Valley with John Turner, Dr. Bailey, and one or two others. The next year he returned to California again, to bring up a band of cattle, whose increase soon made him rich. he occupied a great and undefined tract of land in Yainhill and Polk counties.  He died near Wheatland on October 7, 1882." [History of the Willamette Valley by Herbert Lang p.596]

1832 Joseph GENDRON: aka Jandro.  m1.   ; m2. 1839 Louise Chinook; m3. Pauly of The Dalles.  Gendron was with the Wyeth Expedition.  He settled on French Prairie in 1844 and according to early church records had children by three wives.  He was originally from Montreal, Canada.  Joseph was the father of Louise (1834), Pierre (1837) by his first wife, Catherine I (1842), Catherine II (1844), Edouard (1841), Jean Baptiste (1846) by Louise Chinook and Rose (1850) by Pauly of The Dalles.

1811 Joseph GERVAIS (1777-1861): m1. Tchinouke woman; m2. Marguerite Clatsoppe (d/o Chief Coboway); m3. Marie Angelique Chinook.  Gervais was at one time in the empoyee of the Pacific Fur Co, the Northwest Fur Company and the Hudson's Bay Company.  He was a freeman and was a buffalo hunter when he joined the overland Astorians in 1810.  In later years he settled on French Pairie where he was active in church and civic affairs.  Gervais was described as "a quiet person, and one very easy to get along with" by Roberts.  He had three wives and children by all of them. Gervais was father to Theodore, Mary,  Julie, Adelaide, Francoise, Isaac, Francois Xavier, Edouard, David, Marguerite, Rosalie (and probably others as well)

1804 Pvt. George GIBSON ( -1809): Gibson was a member of Lewis and Clark's "Corp of Discovery".  Gibson was one of the men who made salt at present day Seaside, OR.

1838 Sarah GILBERT: m. Rev. Asa H. SMITH.  Sarah returned east in c1841 due to poor health.

GINGRAS FAMILY RESEARCHER
1828 Jean GINGRAS (1802-1856): m1. 1841 Charlotte Skialks Okanogan (they had been together for twenty+ years already); m2. Olive Forcier; s/o Joseph Gingras; (aka Inigras and Gengras, etc) Jean was an employee of Hudson Bay Company who spent his years of service stationed between the Rockies and the Cascades.   In 1841 he rose to the position of Post Master at Fort Okanogan.  A few years later Gingras retired to French Prairie, taking a claim on the river west of St. Paul Mission.  He is buried at old St. Paul Cemetery, St. Paul, Marion Co, OR in an unmarked grave.  He was father of Jean (II), Angele, Narcisse, Joseph and Marguerite

1828 Jean GINGRAS II (1831- ): m'd 1850 Elizabeth "Betsy" Finlay; s/o Jean and Charlotte (Okanogan) Gingras. By 1855 Gingras appears to have been living near Walla Walla, WA.

1828 Joseph GINGRAS (1829-1913): m'd 1848 Marianne Bastien; s/o Jean and Charlotte (Okanogan) Gingras; addition information on their daughter, Esther can be viewed at Esther Gingras

GOBIN FAMILY RESEARCHER:
182? Antoine GOBIN: m1. Julie Okanogan; m2. Angelle Unknown.  Antoine Spent most of his time at Vancouver.    He was reportedly a cousin of the Jean Baptiste Gobin listed below.  Catholic church records indicate that several of his children were baptized "at the mouth of the Cowlitz River". Antoine was father to Jean Baptiste (1838), Joseph (1850), and Edouard (1852) and probably others as well

1825 Jean Baptiste GOBIN (1805-aft 1886):  m1.  ; m2. 1841 Marguerite Vagnier; m3. Lisette Gagnon Depot.  Gobin stated that he had come overland in a large brigade in 1825, and that he had worked fifteen years as builder and trapper for the Hudson's Bay Company.  He retired to a French Prairie claim in 1840. Gobin was the father of Toussaint (1835) and Jean Baptiste (II) (1837) by his first wife; Francois Xavier (1842), Angelique (1845), Julie (1849), Isabelle (1851), Antoine (1854-1854) and Joseph (1856) by his second wife and  Antoine Arsene (1864-1866), Nazaire Amadee (1866-1870), Josephine (1868), and Melicie Jeanne (1869) by his third wife.

1804 Pvt. Silas GOODRICH: Goodrich was a member of Lewis and Clark's "Corp of Discovery".  He was particularly fond of fishing and was responsible for supplying the expedition with many of its meals of fish.

183? Richard GRANT (1794-1862): m1. Marie Anne Berland; m2. 1845 Helene McDonald (widow of William Kittson).  Grant was Chief Trader and Commander-in-Chief at Fort Hall.  He was described as "a Falstaff of a man with gray head and beard, portly frame and jovial dignity".  Upon his retirement from the service he settled on a cattle ranch in the Beaverhead region of Montana.  He died, along with his daughter, Helene, on Mill Creek, near Walla Walla when returning from The Dalles with a year's supply of provisions for the ranch.  In later years his grave was moved to Mountain View Cemetery, Walla Walla, WA. Grant was father of Helene (1846-1862), Julia Priscilla (1848- ) and Adelina (1850- ).

1792 Capt. Robert GRAY (1855-1806): Gray arrived by ship in 1792 to explore the Oregon territory.

1836 William Henry GRAY (1810-1889): m'd 1838 Mary Augusta Dix. Gray was 11th child of a Scotch Presbyterian minister.  He was a cabinet maker, and had studied medicine.  Gray came west as a missionary lay worker with the Whitmans and Spaldings in 1836 and then returned east to recruit mission forces.  Most of his activities were at Lapwai mission.  In 1840 he was released from his obligation to the American Board of Missions under which he had been working and he went to work for Methodist Mission in Salem as a secular agent.  He was elected to board of the Oregon Institute and helped promote the forming of the Provisional Government.  Gray was a member of the  legislature and during the years 1846-1855 he farmed on Clatsop Plains.  In 1853 he went east and brought back a large band of sheep but with the sheep safely tied up on a raft within sight of his farm a squall came up and every sheep was washed overboard and drowned.  He built a sawmill, warehouse and wharf on the Lewis and Clark River near Astoria and in 1858 spent time in the mining camps on the Frazer river.  In 1861 he built a sloop and transported supplies to Lewiston for profit.  In 1864 he began writing his "History of Oregon" which was published in 1870.  Gray died 14 Nov 1889 in Portland and was buried in Astoria.  Twenty five year later the remains of him and his wife were removed to the mission grounds at  Waiilatpu where he had begun his labors where they were buried  beside those of his old friends, Dr. and Mrs. Whitman  *1: MSS#1202, 87pp printed journal in collection at OHS

c1814 Etienne GREGOIRE (c1791-1867): m'd Marguerite Kamloops (Shuswap, Shouchauabe); born Makinonge, Lower Canada; s/o Etienne and Marie (Savigny) Gregoire; Northwest Company employee 1814-1815 in the Columbia District; middleman for the Hudson's Bay Company; retired and settled near St. Louis in 1842; father of Julie, Antoine, Sophie, David, Felix, Therese and Simon; Marguerite died in 1860; both are buried at St. Louis Cemetery, St. Louis, Marion County, Oregon

182?  Pierre GRENIER ( -1830): m'd Therese Spokane.  Grenier was a trapper and boatman, usually with Peter Skene Ogden on the Snake River.  Returning from the fifth of Ogden's Snake River Expeditions, Grenier and eight others were drowned when their  boat was shattered in a whirlpool at the Dalles.  Grenier was the father of Marie Anne Grenier (1830- ).

182? Charles GROSLOUIS (1) ( -bef 1841): m'd Unknown Pend d' Oreille.  Groslouis was an engage from Canada.  He served with Peter Skene Ogden during 1824-26.  He was the father of Ursule (1821), Henriette, Joseph, Pierre, Jean Baptiste and Charles (II) (1832). Both he and his wife were death by 1841 when their son, Joseph, was baptized.

1836 Alexander GUERETTE (1815- ): dit Dumont, Dumond. m'd 1841 Josephte Finlay.  Alexander described himself as an American half-breed who was born in Green Bay, WI.  He took up a donation land claim in Marion County but in later years moved to Douglas County.  He was the father of Marguerite, Auguste and Alexandre.

1813 Morise GUERIN: Guerine was a Pacific Fur Co employee

1838 Hilaire GUILBAULT ( -1849): m'd 1842 Louise Walla Walla.  Guilbault was a middleman with the Hudson's Bay Company bringing the priests west in 1838.  He was one of those able to save himself in the bateau disaster.  In 1847-48 he was a laborer at the Cowlitz Farm.  He later moved to French Prairie.  He died at St. Paul in June 26, 1849.

183? Paul GUILBAULT (1800-c1849): m1. 1838 Caty Walla Walla; m2. 1848 Francoise Cayuse (widow of Thomas Tawakon).  Guilbault was a boatman from Quebec, Canada in the employee of the Hudson's Bay Company.  He was sent from Fort Walla Walla in 1831 to join John Works brigade.  It is thought that Guilbault may have died in the gold fields.  He was the father of Francois (1833), Louis (1836), Paul (1838) and Marie (1841), as well as two others.

1804 Pvt. Hugh HALL (1772- ):  Hall was a member of Lewis and Clark's "Corp of Discovery".  Hall received 25 lashes for disobedience.  He returned by land to the Mandans under command of Sgt. Pryor who was in charge of driving the horses.

1812 John Cook HALSEY: Halsey was a Pacific Fur Co employee and a clerk for the Astorians who arrived on the ship Beaver. He built a house and trading post on the Willamette near Salem.

1828 John Edward HARRIOTT:

1823 Moses "Black" HARRIS  ( -1849): Harris was a freeman trapper and an experienced mountain man.  In later years he led several emigrations west including one in 1844 with Nathaniel Ford.  He stayed in Oregon for three years exploring new land routes into the valley for emigration and trade. In 1845 he was one of those who aided the emigrants who took the Meek Cutoff. May 1847 he returned east where he died May 1849 in Independence, MO from cholera. There is quite a bit of controversy over whether he was a black man but the general consensus is that he was not.

1836 Eliza HART: m'd Rev. Henry SPALDING. Eliza was one of those with the overland Methodist Missionary party in 1836. *1: MSS#1201, 32pp diary typescript in collection at OHS

1813 Jacque HARTEAU: Harteau was a Pacific Fur Co employee and a freeman hunter.

1834 Webley J. HAUXHURST (1806-1874).: m'd 1837 Mary "Wat Wat" Yamhill.  Hauxhurst ran away to sea as a young man.  He deserted when his ship reached CA.  He spent 3 years in Monterey as furniture maker and carpenter before coming to Oregon with Ewing Young in 1834.  With funds from Dr. McLoughlin he built the first grist mill in Oregon in 1834. He became the first white convert of the Oregon Mission,  abandoned his "intemperate ways" and became a leader in the church. Hauxhurst was  elected to the board of the Oregon Institute in 1843 and served on the first board of the Willamette University after it was chartered in 1853.  He took up a land claim on Mill Creek near the present site of the penitentiary at  Salem. During the gold rush he had a successful business making pack saddles. In later years he moved to Tillamook where he plied as captain on the schooner Champion between that port and Portland.  He died Jan 23, 1874 and is buried near Tillamook in unmarked grave.

1814 Alexander HENRY: Henry was in the Oregon territory by 1814. He was a cousin of William Henry and traveled upriver in 1814 to visit his cousin.

1813 William HENRY: Henry was a clerk for the Northwest Co who was in charge of the Willamette valley post near Champoeg in 1813.

1829 Francis HERON aka Herren (1794-1840): m'd Josephte Clarke (also seen under her stepfather's name, Boucher); m2. Isabella Chalifoux.  Heron was an Irish employee of the Hudson's Bay Company.  He was transferred to the Columbia District in 1829 and rose to the rank of Chief Trader in 1836.   He deserted Josephte when he moved to the Red River District.  While at Red River he married Isabella Chalifoux..  His first wife later married John McKay (I).

1811 Robert HILL: Hill was a crew member and sailor on the Tonquin.

HITCHCOCK FAMILY RESEARCHER:
1832
 Isaac HITCHCOCK:  new documentation confirms  that Isaac was in CA as early as 1832 and was associated with the Bonneville party.  He had an early knowledge of the Sierra Nevada mountains and appears to show up in the same areas as Joseph Walker.  He accompanied his widowed daughter, Elizabeth Patterson and her 5 children as a member and guide for the Murphy-Stephens party of 1844.

1811 John HOBACK (aka Hobough): Hoback was a Pacific Fur Co employee, freeman hunter and an overland Astorian.

1811 Francis William HODGKINS (aka Hodgens): Hodgkins was a Pacific Fur Co employee, a Blacksmith and an overland Astorian.

1834 John HOWARD aka Hord, Hoard, John: m1. 1837 Marie Lisette Desportes (Dupate); m2. 1842 Catherine Longtain. John was illiterate and signed his name with an "X", consequently his name has been found spelled numerous ways.  He was an Irishman who came up from California with Ewing Young in 1834. Records indicate he was a farmer, carpenter, and tavern keeper at Champoeg.  He was the father of Charles and Catherine and probably others.

1804 Pvt. Thomas P. HOWARD (1779- ):  Howard was a member of Lewis and Clark's "Corp of Discovery". Was an old soldier who was tried by a court martial when he did not return from the Mandan Village by dark.  Instead of calling to the guard to gain entry he scaled the works which was against all regulations.

183? Richard HOWE (c1794-1884): Howe was a boatswain in the British Navy who served for many years on vessels sailing between London and Vancouver.  He retired in 1838 to what is now Washougal, WA.  He is said to have been a very tall, good-looking man.  Since he was illiterate his name often shows up in records as "Ough".  One of the early pioneers wrote in later times that "old Dick Ough used to get drunk and beat his woman.  He had three nice girls." Howe was the father of six daughters, Elizabeth, Emilie, Mary, Sarah and Grace and one who had died young and sons Richard and Benjamin

1834 Thomas Jefferson HUBBARD (1806-1875): m'd 1837 Mary Sommata. Hubbard came to Oregon Territory with Wyeth's second expedition in 1834.  Shortly after arrival he was living with an Indian girl as his wife.  One Thornburgh, her former lover, vowed to get her back and broke into the cabin in the  dead of night. Hubbard, who was armed, shot and killed him.  An inquiry into the murder judged it to be "justifiable homicide"  He formally married her in 1837.  Hubbard was the leader of a party who set out in 1840 to bring cattle from CA.  They  were attacked by  Shasta Indians and barely escaped with their lives.  He was involved in establishment of Provisional Govt.  During the gold rush he built a ship at Oregon City, loaded it with flour and sailed it to San Francisco where he sold both cargo and vessel. He had a donation land claim in Yamhill county but sold  it and by 1864 had moved to Umatilla Co.  He settled near Pilot Rock .  Hubbard died in 1875 at the Umatilla agency where he had been taken during his last illness.  His widow never remarried.  She died in 1907 at Walla Walla hospital, age 90.

1830 Joachim HUBERT (1788-1873): m'd  c1830 Josephte Kanhopitsa (des Chaudieres).  Hubert spent forty years at Fort Colville.  He was the father of Joseph (1831), Isabelle (1833), and Archange (1835)

1813 Canote HUMPHERVILLE (1788-1842): m1. Pauline Sinpoel; m2. Marguerite Michina.  Humpherville was a metis who was employed first by the North West Fur Company and later the Hudson's Bay Company.  He was stationed at Fort Colville 1831-1839.  In 1813 he was a canoeman at Fort George.  Humpherville was drowned in 1842 when the boat he was in swamped at the Dalles.  His widow and her five small children went to live on French Prairie with her step-son, Pierre.  Humpherville was the father of Isabelle (1823), Gregoire (1825), Louise (1831), Jeanne (1833), Nancy (1834), Josephte (1837), Louis (1838)  and Felicite (1840)

1811 Wilson Price HUNT:  Hunt was a partner in the Pacific Fur Company and was the leader of the "overland Astorians".

1830 David E. JACKSON: Jackson was a partner with Jedediah Smith and William Sublette.  The Smith-Jackson-Sublette expedition of 1830 was the beginning for the Oregon Trail.

1811 Charles JACQUETTE: Jacquette was a Pacific Fur Co employee and an overland Astorian

183? Pierre Stanislas JACQUET (1813- ): m'd 1839 Victoire Tchinouk.  Jacquet was born at Havre de Grace but left home at eleven to go to sea.  He was able to read and aided the missionaries in teaching reading.  He was a laborer at Fort Vancouver.

1821 Charles JEAUDOIN (1800-1848): m'd Magdeleine Servant. Jeaudoin was employed by the Hudson's Bay Company at Ft. George in 1821.  He formed an alliance with an Indian woman, Wallalikas Chinook.  Two children were born to them.  In 1826-27 he accompanied a trapping expedition south under command of A.R. McLeod, Chief Trader.  Charles retired from the Hudson's Bay Company in 1831, settling on French Prairie.  He died 30 Apr 1848 and was buried in St. Paul Cemetery, St. Paul, OR

1811 Paul Den JEREMIE: Jeremie was a vaoyageur and Astorian with the Pacific Fur Company.  He arrived on the Tonquin.

183? Sigfroid JOBIN:

1837 Elvira JOHNSON: m'd 1837 Rev. Henry Kirk White PERKINS.  Elvira arrived in May 1837 as a member of reinforcements sent to aid Jason Lee at the Willamette Mission.  She married H.K.W. Perkins at the end of her first year in Oregon. She was described  as a willing worker, amiable, well thought of, and a person who made every effort to be useful.

1811 Joseph JOHNSON: Johnson was a crew member and sailor on the Tonquin.

1817 William JOHNSON (c1790-1842): Johnson was an Englishman who went to sea as young man.  He claimed to have fought on the Constitution against the Guerriere in the War of 1812.  He joined the Northwest Fur Company in 1817 and in 1821 joined Hudson's Bay Company as a tra[[er.   He settled at Champoeg around 1835 and took up farming.  In 1842 he left a successful farm and moved to Portland.  It was here that he began distilling a concoction known as "Blue Ruin" which gained him local fame.   

1811 Benjamin JONES:  Jones was an overland Astorian

1837 Rev. Lewis Hubell JUDSON (1809-1880): m1. 1831 Almira Roberts; m2. 1846 Nancy Hawkins. Judson was a member of the Methodist reinforcements that arrived on Lausanne in 1840.  He later served on the board of trustees of Oregon Institute.  After the Mission was reorganized in 1844 he  bought the mills near the mission for $6000.  He became a surveyor for Marion Co.  Judson is buried in Salem Pioneer Cemetery, Salem, Marion Co, OR   [OHS MS, papers for 1837-1849]

1813 James KEITH (1782-1852): Keith came overland to Fort George in 1813.  He was in charge of Columbia River Department 1816-1817.

1834 Hall J. KELLEY: Kelley was an Oregon promoter that organized a group of 13 men in southern Calif. to come to Oregon in 1834.

1837 Mary A. KINNEY ( -1841): m'd David LESLIE.  Mary arrived with her husband and three children as reinforcements for the Methodist Mission.  She died in 1841 leaving six children.

1834 Guillaume "William" KITTSON (c1793-1841): m'd 1839 Helene McDonald.  Kittson was a veteran of the war of 1812.  He was first an employee of the Northwest Company and later joined the Hudson's Bay company.  In 1834 he was sent to Fort Nisqually where he conducted trade and oversaw farming activities.  He died in 1841 of a "long and painful malady".  His widow married Richard Grant.  He was the father of Pierre Charles (1832) and Eloise Jemima (1836).

1811 Johan KOASFER: Koasfer was a Russian who arrived on the Tonquin with the Pacific Fur Company.  He was a carpenter.

1804 Pvt. Francis LABICHE:  Labiche was a member of Lewis and Clark's "Corp of Discovery". He was one of the two French watermen (the other being Croisette).  Besides the duties performed as such, he also served as a French and English interpreter, and sometimes also as an Indian interpreter.

1811 Jean Baptiste LABONTE: Labonte was a Pacific Fur Co employee and an overland Astorian.  It is reported that he returned east.

1811 Louis LABONTE Sr. (1783-1860): m'd Marguerite "Kol-a-ko-tak" Clatsop, d/o subchief Coboway of the Clatsop tribe.  Labonte was a Pacific Fur Co employee and an overland Astorian.   He was a carpenter for various fur companies.    In 1828 he retired from the Hudson's Bay Company and returned to Canada to obtain his discharge.  He returned west again in 1830 and he and his wife settled on a farm across the river from French Prairie.  It was said to be one of the best farms in the country.

1811 Andre LACHAPELLE Jr. (1802-1881): m'd 1841 Adrienne Lucier; Lachapelle was a Pacific Fur Co employee and an overland Astorian.  He was employed  as a boatman and a blacksmith by the Hudson's Bay Company from 1817-1841.   He was sent to Fort Vancouver in 1824 and in 1833 returned to Canada where he remained for a short time.  He returned to Fort Vancouver and in 1841 he retired and took up farming on French Prairie.  Upon his death in 1881 in Portland, his obituary referred to him as "the oldest pioneer in Oregon" and credited him with being 100 years old.  His stone in the St. Louis Cemetery, however, states that he was 79yrs1mo29das and it is believed that it is correct.   
"Born in Montreal,Canada, Aug. 14, 1781 ; left home in 1817, having hired to the Hudson's Bay Company for three years ; came to Oregon in the same year, arriving at Fort George (Astoria). Worked for two years as blacksmith. Spent several succeeding years at the same place, until in 1824 Dr. McLoughlin arrived and ordered the removal of the station to Vancouver. There Lachapelle remained until 1833. In that year he traveled eastward with the design of going home ; but arriving on the Saskatchewan he gave up his intention and hired again to the powerful fur company, and came again to Vancouver. He staid until 1836, when being again taken with the idea of going home, he made a second trip to the "Great Lone Land" and again returned at Dr. McLoughlin's solicitation. In 1841, being superannuated, he was allowed or encouraged to go, with sundry other Canadians, to the Willamette, where they engaged in farming. He married and settled on a farm in French Prairie, and remained there for forty years. He died on June 11, 1881, at St. Vincent s Hospital,
Portland. He was undoubtedly the oldest pioneer of Oregon." [History of the Willamette Valley by Herbert Lang p.592-3]

182? Pierre LACOURSE (1792-1864): m1. Archange Tchinouk (aka Skaisis Cree, Skoucisse Chinook and Archange Chehalis); m2. Josephte Sinemaule NezPerce (aka Okanogan).  Lacourse was a steerman and a boatbuilder for the Hudson's Bay Company.  After many years at Fort Colville he retired to French Prairie in 1843.  He was the father of Alexis (1834), Culbert (1836), and Rose (1824)

1830 Francois Xavier LADEROUTE aka Ladaroote, Latourette (1800-1864): m1. 1838 Julia Gervais; m2. 1847 Mary Ann Ouvre. Laderoute (aka Latourette) was an employee of the Hudson's Bay Company.  In 1847 he settled on a Donation Land Claim near Fairfield, Marion County, OR.  He was the father of 15 children, 4 by his first wife (Joseph 1835, Victoire 1837, Isadore 1841 and Francois Xavier 1844) and 11 by his second.  

laFANTAISE FAMILY RESEARCHER:
1811
Jacques LAFANTAISIE (c1793-bef 1848) : m'd c1818 Susanne Okanogan. Lafantaisie was a voyageur and Pacific Fur Co employee who arrived on the Tonquin.  He was engaged as a boatman and interpreter for the Hudson's Bay Company.  He was mentioned by Simpson in 1828 but by 1848 when his wife was baptized there was no mention of him.

1811 Michel LAFERTE dit Placide, Placie, Plasse (c1790-1861): m'd 1839 Josephte Nez Perce (Chimhaney).  Laferte was a Pacific Fur Company employee who arrived via the Tonquin.  He was on the roster for the Northwest Company in 1813-14 as a boatman and was recorded with Ogden in the Snake River country in 1824-26.  He was with Work in the same region 1831-32.  Laferte and Josephte were the parents of Antoine (1825), Olivier (1827), Michel (1831), Marie (1834), Catherine (1838), Madeleine and Pierre.

laFRAMBOISE FAMILY RESEARCHER:
183?
Francois LAFRAMBOISE (1814- ): m1. Margureite Tomwata; m2. Denise Dorion. Francois was the son of Joseph and Catherine (de la Madeleine) Laframboise of Canada.  His relationship to Michel, Joseph, and Thomas Laframboise is not known.  Francoise settled in Washington and moved about considerably.  During the 1850s he was reportedly growing timothy hay for market a few miles below Vancouver.

1811 Michel LAFRAMBOISE (1792- ): m'd 1839 Emelie Picard. Laframboise was a voyageur and Pacific Fur Co employee who arrived on the Tonquin. He was described as a "short, stout, energetic, vivacious French-Canadian". He joined Northwest Company and then transferred to Hudson Bay Company where he generally served as a scout, brigade leader and interpreter.  He claimed to have a wife in every tribe which aided in his ability to work with the natives.  In 1826 Laframboise was with McLeod's southern expedition.  Laframboise was literate at a time when many engages were not.  In later years he ran a ferry across the Willamette at Champoeg until a stroke forced him to sell his holdings. He and his wife lived with their daughter, Josephte Labonte until his death.

1811 Louis LALIBERTE: Laliberte was a Pacific Fur Co employee who arrived with the overland Astorians.

1811 Francois LANDRIE: Landrie was a Pacific Fur Co employee who arrived with the overland Astorians.

1811 Joseph LANDRY(1805-1852): m'd Josephte Spokane. Landry was a Pacific Fur Co employee who arrived with the overland Astorians.  He worked for Northwest Company with agreement that he was free to hunt on Willamette in winter. Not much is recorded of Joseph Landry.  He died in October 1852 at St. Louis, Marion County.  His widow married Francois Dupre the next year.

1829 Pierre Charles dit LANGLOIS (c1790- ): m1. Louise Clallam; m2. 1842 Marguerite Sassete.  Pierre was a native middleman employed with the Hudson's Bay Company.  He went to Fort Walla Walla in 1829 with James Barnsten, to Fort Langley later in the same year with Archibald McDonald and north with Tolmie in 1833.  He was Wilkes' guide in Washington in 1841.  Langlois was described as "a middle-sized, broad chested Indian, a Baniker from near Montreal, aged 40, and the best deer hunter of the Rocky Mountains"--Tolmie.  He was the father of Antoine (1833), Joseph (1836) and Charles (1839)

1811 Michel LANSON: Lanson was a Pacific Fur Co employee who arrived with the overland Astorians.

1804 Pvt. Jean Baptiste LAPAGE: Lapage was a member of Lewis and Clark's "Corp of Discovery". He enlisted at Fort Mandan to replace John Newman who was punished for misconduct and sent back to St. Louis Apr 7, 1805. A French Canadian, Lapage had been with the Cheyenne Indians in the Black Mountains the previous summer and had descended the Little Missouri River.

1811 Basil LAPENSEE: Lapensee was a voyageur and Astorian who arrived on the Tonquin.   Basil and Ignaze were brothers from Montreal.  Both were young men whose parents had entrusted them to Alexander McKay.  They were drowned at the mouth of the Columbia when they were sent out by Capt. Thorn in a small boat to sound out the bar. "We especially regretted the loss of the two Lapensee and Joseph Nadeau.  At their departure from Montreal, these young men had been entrusted by their parents to the particular care of Mr. McKay, and by their good conduct they had acquired the esteem of the captain, the crew, and all the passengers.  The brothers Lapensee were second to none of their companions in action, in courage, and in their good will."

1811 Ignace LAPENSEE: Lapensee was a voyageur and Astorian who arrived on the Tonquin.   Basil and Ignaze were brothers from Montreal.  Both were young men whose parents had entrusted them to Alexander McKay.  They were drowned at the mouth of the Columbia when they were sent out by Capt. Thorn in a small boat to sound out the bar.  "We especially regretted the loss of the two Lapensee and Joseph Nadeau.  At their departure from Montreal, these young men had been entrusted by their parents to the particular care of Mr. McKay, and by their good conduct they had acquired the esteem of the captain, the crew, and all the passengers.  The brothers Lapensee were second to none of their companions in action, in courage, and in their good will."

1811 Olivier Roy LAPENSEE: Lapensee was a voyageur and Astorian who arrived on the Tonquin.  His relationship to the two brothers above is unknown.

1811 Joseph LAPIERRE ( -bef 1837): m'd Susanne Okanogan.  Lapierre was a voyageur and Pacific Fur Co employee.  He arrived on the Tonquin and was later employed at Fort Vancouver hauling water to the fort.  He was called "old stone" in a literal translation of his name.  After the fort was moved to the river bank he is shown at Fort Colville as a carpenter.  His wife is shown with a new husband in 1837 so it is assumed that Joseph had either died or moved on.

LARISON FAMILY RESEARCHER:
183? John LARISON: m'd Helene Reinette PERRAULT.  m2. 1843 Eleanor Unknown. Larison was one of the old breed of mountain men, coming from OH originally.  He was a free trapper with the American Fur Company.  He retired c1839 to a location near the mouth of the Yamhill River.

1813 Charles LASSIER: Lassier was a Pacific Fur Company employee.

1813 Francois LATOUR: Latour was an employee of the Northwest Company.

LAVADOUR FAMILY RESEARCHER:
182? Joseph LAVADOUR (1791-1892): m'd Lisette Walla Walla (d/o Chief Peopeomoxmox); Lavadour was an employee of the Hudson Bay Company and was reportedly trapping with Alexander Dumont on the South Umpqua in the 1820s.   He is buried in the St. Andrews Mission Cemetery near Pendleton, Umatilla County, OR.  The dates on his headstone say 1791-1892 which is a span of over 100 years.  His wife Lisette is buried beside him (1817-1891).  

1811 Louis LAVALLE: Pacific Fur Co employee; overland Astorian

1830 Hyacinthe LAVIGNEUR ( -1846); m'd Marguerite COLVILLE. Lavigneur aka Lavigueur, was in the west by 1831.  He settled in the St. Paul area and died in 1846 while helping to build the church at St. Paul.  His wife died two years later and both are buried in the St. Paul Cemetery.  Hyacinthe was a farmer but also made pottery and iron work articles.  He was the father of Noel (1830-1847); Jean Baptiste(1832); Francois (1834); Francois Xavier (1836-1850); Joseph (1838); Hyacinthe II (1842)

1838 Pierre LEBLANC ( -1838): m'd Nancy McKensie.  Leblanc was a carpenter and miller from Red River who had hired out to the Hudson's Bay Company.  He arrived with the brigade bringing the priests in 1838.  He was in one of the bateaus that turned over at the Dalles.  Leblanc and three of his children were drowned.  Two of the children were found and buried but Leblanc and the third child were never recovered.

1811 Francois LECLERC: Francois was an employee of the Pacific Fur Company and an overland Astorian

1811 Giles LE CLERC: Giles was a voyageur and Astorian with the Pacific Fur Co. He arrived on the Tonquin

1811 Alexis LECOMPTE: Lecompte was an employee of the Pacific Fur Company and an overland Astorian

1834 Rev. Daniel LEE (1806-1895): m'd 1840 Maria WAIR [aka WARE].  He was the nephew of Jason Lee and accompanied him to Oregon in 1834. Much of his work in Oregon was done at The Dalles. In 1843 he and his family returned to the east because of his wife's ill health. He built Wascopam Mission at the Dalles in 1838 while Jason Lee was in the States. *For additional information see listing under missionaries.

1834 Rev. Jason LEE (1803-1845): m'd 1837 Anna Maria PITTMAN.  Lee built the first Methodist mission in 1834 with help of nephew, Rev. Daniel Lee, and 3 lay assistants Cyrus Shepard, Philip L. Edwards and Courtney M. Walker. *For additional information see listing under missionaries and Lee Mission Cemetery

1811 Guillaume LEROUX: Leroux was an employee of the Pacific Fur Company and an overland Astorian

1837 Rev. David LESLIE (1797-1869): m1. Mary A. KINNEY; m2. Adelia JUDSON.  Leslie arrived Sep 1837 in reinforcements sent out to Willamette Mission.  He was accompanied by his wife and 3 children.  His wife died in 1841 leaving six children.  While she was ill their house burned to the ground with all their possessions.After her death his oldest daughter, her husband and her younger sister drowned at Oregon City when they were swept over the falls.  Another child died  in the Sandwich Islands while visiting there with her father.  Rev. Leslie is buried at Salem Pioneer Cemetery, Salem, Marion Co, OR  
"LESLIE, DAVID.--
Born in New Hampshire in 1797. Was a descendant of Rev. Geo. Leslie, of Puritan stock. In 1837, crossed the plains to Oregon as a Missionary, commissioned by the Methodist Church. He took up his residence ten miles below the present site of Salem, but in 1843 came to Salem, then Chemekete. Subsequently he performed a term of ministerial service at Oregon City. Was one of the founders of the Willamette University, and was President of its Board of Trustees for twenty-five consecutive years. Mr. Leslie was married to Miss Mary A. Kinney, and by her had six children. The wife died in 1841, and he was again married in 1844, to Mrs. A. (Judson) Alley, by whom he had two children, both deceased. One of his children is buried in the East; one in tropical lands; two daughters and a son were carried over the Willamette Falls in the dreadful accident related by Dr. White; three daughters and the first Mrs. Leslie sleep in Oregon graves, while the second wife and one daughter Helen Leslie now live in Salem." [History of the Willamette Valley by Herbert Lang p 596-7]

1837 Mary C. LESLIE (1833- ): d/o David and Mary (Kinney) Leslie

1837 Miss LESLIE #3: d/o David and Mary (Kinney) Leslie  

1837 Satira LESLIE ( -1843): m'd 1842 Cornelius Rogers; d/o David and Mary (Kinney) Leslie. Satira, her husband and a younger sister were drowned when they were swept over the falls at Oregon City

1811 James LEWIS ( -1811): Lewis was a clerk and Astorian with the Pacific Fur Company.  He arrived on the Tonquin and was killed shortly after arrival in a massacre on the ship during a trading expedition.

1804 Meriwether LEWIS:  Lewis headed an expedition with friend, William Clark, to the Oregon country. Meriwether Lewis, son of William and Mary [Garland] Lewis, was born on 18 Aug 1774 near the town of Charlottesville, Albemarle County, VA. After returning from the expedition he was nominated and confirmed as governor of Louisiana. In the fall of 1809 Lewis left for Chickasaw Bluffs, now Memphis, TN. He never reached his destination. He committed suicide due to depression and derangement. The State of Tennessee, where Lewis is buried, created Lewis county out of other counties, and in 1848 erected a monument to his memory over his grave. The inscription reads: Meriwether Lewis, Born near Charlottesville, VA., August 18, 1774. Died October 11, 1809. Age 35 years.

1811 James LEWIS ( -1812): Lewis was a clerk and anAstorian with the Pacific Fur Company.  He died on the Tonquin when it was overrun by Indians during a trading expedition shortly after their arrival.

1813 John LITTLE: Little was a Pacific Fur Co employee and a boatbuilder.

1837 John LONG:

LONGTAINE FAMILY RESEARCHER
1811 Andre LONGTAINE (1794-c1878): c1820 Nancy OKANOGAN.   Longtain was arrived on the Tonquin and became a prominent early settler at Champoeg.  He entered the fur trade with the North West Fur Company about 1819.  In  c1826-c1833 he was an employee of the Hudson Bay Company in the Columbia District as a mid-boat oarsman and trapper.  He settled c1835 at Champoeg.  The current Champoeg State Park is largely composed of land which was within his claim.

1813 Etienne LONGTAIN: Longtain was an employee of the North West Company.

1838 Ignace LOSIERE: "Losiere was a laborer from Three Rivers, Quebec, in the employ of the Hudson's Bay Company at Cowlitz Farm in 1848, `hauling the lumber from the mill to the edge of the woods.'  He was twice married to natives, Shophie Chehalis in 1839 and Julie `Serpent' in 1843.  He served in the Cowlitz Rangers of the Washington Territory Mounted Volunteers under Captain Henry Peers in 1856.  In applying for his pension about 1900, his widow, Julie, described him as having been five feet eight inches tall, with blue eyes and red hair.  One daughter, Louise, is recorded." [Catholic Church Records of the Pacific Northwest Vancouver  by  Warner and Munick, Vols 1 & 2 and Stellamaris Mission, p. A-50]

1812 Charles LUCIER: Lucier was an employee of the Pacific Fur Company and an overland Astorian

1812 Etienne LUCIER (c1793-1853): m1. 1814 Indian wife; m2. 1840 Margaret Unknown; s/o Michel Lussier & Marie Victoire Deline-Valet * per Bernard Lussier at asdf@vif.com.  Lucier was an employee of the Pacific Fur Company and an overland Astorian.  By 1826 he is listed as a freeman. In 1829 he joined McLeod's party for an expedition southward to Calif.   Lucier was back by 1830 and had taken up farming. He maintained a camp near Champoeg where he was dealing in horses.  Lucier was described as "short and stocky".   Additional information can be found at Etienne Lussier

1838 Joseph MAHI:  Joseph died in 1839 in the Sandwich Islands [ Joseph MAHI or MAKI, with wife Maria, arrived to assist the Whitmans in the summer of 1838 as replacements for the Owyhees. A bachelor, Jack, arrived with them [roster Narcissa Whitman]

1838  Maria MAHI (or MAKI):  Joseph, with wife Maria, arrived to assist the Whitmans in the summer of 1838 as replacements for the Owyhees. [roster Narcissa Whitman]

1813 Louis MAJEAU: Majeau was an employee of the North West Fur Company.

1825  Donald MANSON (1800-1880): m'd 1828 Felicite Lucier. He was transferred in 1825 from the eastern side of the Rockies to the western side.  His posts included Fort Langley, Fort George, Fort McLoughlin, Kamloops, Stikine and Stuart Lake. Manson established Ft.Simpson for the Hudson Bay Company in 1829,   Ft. McLaughlin (Vancouver) in 1830 and was in charge of Kamloop station after the murder of Black in 1841.  He then took over charge of Ft. Stikeen after the murder of John McLaughlin Jr. in 1842.  After his retirement he settled at Champoeg in Marion county.  He was financially ruined during the flood of 1861 but rebuilt his house which remained in the family until 1931 when it burned.  He was described as "6' tall with a military bearing".  

1812 Francois MARTIAL (aka Marcial): Martial was a Pacific Fur Company employee, a sawyer and an overland Astorian.

1811 John MARTIN ( -1811): Martin was a crew member and sailor on the Tonquin.  He drowned at the mouth of the Columbia River

1825 Michel MARTINEAU (1825-1902): came to Oregon with John McLoughlin

182? Pierre MARTINEAU ( -1842):

1811 W. W. MATTHEWS:   Mathews was a clerk and Astorian with the Pacific Fur Company.  He arrived on the Tonquin.

1813 Alexis MASCON: Mascon was a Pacific Fur Co employee.

1811 William W. MATTHEWS:  m'd Marguerite "Kol-a-ko-tak" Clatsop, d/o subchief Coboway of the Clatsop tribe.  Matthews was a Pacific Fur Company employee where he is listed as a clerk and architect.  He was an overland Astorian andaccompanied Donald McKenzie on an exploration of the Willamette valley in 1812.   In 1814 he traveled with Alexander Henry to the post at Champoeg to visit Henry's cousin. His wife later married James McMillan.

1834 William MCCARTY ( -1854):  McCarty was described as an Irishman who arrived in 1834.  He was elected constable at the first meeting to form a government in 1841.  McCarty settled at Chinook, WA where he had a fine farm on the Point.  He married one of the daughters of  Chief Carcowan of the Chehalis tribe.  McCarty was sometimes called "Brandywine" from having formerly sailed on the frigate Brandywine.  His canoe upset in the Wallacut River in 1854 and he was drowned leaving a dau 10-12 years old.  The will was admitted to probate 11 Dec 1854.

1812 Robert MCCLELLAN:  aka McLellan.  McClellan was an overland Astorian. "Here it was that Mr. McClellan, another partner joined the expedition.  This man was one of the finest shots in America; nothing could escape his keen eye and steady hand; hardy, enterprising and brave as a lion." (Alexander Ross) This was Robert McClellan, one of the famous characters of the northwestern frontier.  He was remarkably agile, and famed for his swiftness of foot.  He served as one of General Wayne's chief scouts in the Indian War of 1792-04.

1836  Archibald MCDONALD:  McDonald was probably already a long-term employee of the Hudson's Bay Company in the Northwest.  He took charge of Ft. Coleville in 1836 and remained as head of the fort until 1843 with his metis wife and their four children.

1824 Finan MCDONALD: McDonald was in Oregon territory by 1824.  Norecord of his original arrival date has been found.

1811 John MCDONALD: John McDonald was an employee of the North West Company.

1811 Duncan MCDOUGALL:  m'd d/o Chief Concomly.  McDougall was a partner in the Pacific Fur Co and an Astorian who arrived on the Tonquin. In the absence of Wilson Price Hunt, Duncan McDougall Esq. was the deputy agent and assumed command.  He was an old North West Company employee who, in the absence of Mr. Hunt, held the first place in Mr. Astor's confidence.  "He was a man of but ordinary capacity, with an irritable, peevish temper, the most unfit man in the world to head an expedition or command men." (Alexander Ross) After the Pacific Fur Company sold he joined the North West Company and remained at Astoria (Ft. George) until 1817 when he was sent to Fort William.

1811 Donald MCGILLIS: McGillis was a clerk and Astorian with the Pacific Fur Co employee.  He arrived on the Tonquin.

1813 Joseph MCGILLIVRAY (1790-1832): McGillivray was a partner in the North West Company who was put in charge of Fort Okanogan.  He became Chief Trader in 1821.

1792 Alexander MCKAY ( -1811): m'd Marguerite Wadin.  McKay was an employee of the North West Company for some years prior to 1791.  He went overland with  Sir Alexander McKenzie to the Puget Sound area in 1792-3.  He became a partner in 1799 and retired from the North West Company in 1808.  Two years later he joined the Pacific Fur Company and arrived in the Pacific Northwest on the Tonquin.  He was murdered by Indians when the Tonquin was overrun during a trading expedition shortly after its arrival.

1811 Jean Baptiste MCKAY dit Desportes:  McKay was an overland Astorian who stayed in Oregon after the breakup of the company.  He settled c1830 at French Prairie and became a prosperous farmer.

183? Kenneth MCKAY (c1808-1840): killed 15 Aug 1840 on the Columbia River

1811 Thomas MCKAY (1796-c1850): s/o Alexander McKay and Marguerite Wadin. McKay was a clerk and Astorian with the Pacific Fur Company.  He arrived on the Tonquin.  After the death of his father on the Tonquin his mother remarried John McLoughlin. Thomas was tall, muscular, had a thin face, black hair, whiskers and restless black eyes set beneath projecting eyebrows.  He worked as a clerk, interpreter and guide for the various fur companies.  He retired in 1839 and spent his remaining years between his farm at Champoeg and his farm at Scappoose.  He is buried on his land claim at Scappoose.  His sons John and Alexander were sent east with Marcus Whitman in 1838.  His daughters stayed at the Whitman Mission to obtain an education.

1811 Andrew MCKENZIE:

1811 Donald MCKENZIE: McKenzie was originally a clerk for Northwest Company before becoming a partner in the Pacific Fur Co. His energy and enthusiasm earned him the nickname "Perpetual Motion".  He was an overland Astorian.

1813 Donald MCLENNAN:  McClennan was a clerk and Astorian with the Pacific Fur Company.  He arrived on the Tonquin.

John MCLEOD FAMILY RESEARCHER:
1826 Alexander Roderick MCLEOD: McLeod was a chief trader for the Hudson's Bay Company.  He led a party through the Umpqua country in 1826.  He became a companion of McKay after 1836 and settled in Tualatin c1846.

1838 John MCLEOD (1815 - 1905): m'd SCANEWA, Clayquadote (Mary). John McLeod left his home in the village of Gerenin, Scotland in May, 1837 and sought employment with the Hudson's Bay Company. He was part of the "annual brigade" that crossed North America via Canada with John Tod as the group's guide. Among the company were two Jesuit priests, Modeste Demers and Francis Blanchet. Survived the capsizing of a canoe at the Dalles du Mort on the Columbia River where twelve were drowned. Worked for Hudson's Bay Company as a stoker aboard the steamship Beaver and, later, as manager of the company's farm station at Lake Steilacoom.

 

1825 Elizabeth Mary MCLOUGHLIN (1816- ): m'd William Randolph; d/o Dr. John and Marguerite (Wadin) McLoughlin

1824 Eloisa Maria MCLOUGHLIN (1817-1884): m1. William Glen RAE; m2. Daniel HARVEY; d/o Dr. John and Marguerite (Wadin) McLoughlin.  Eloisa was described by the Methodist Mission reinforcements as a "lovely, fair-complexioned girl about 21 years who spoke English and French".  She was the mother of 6 children, 3 by each husband.  Her first husband committed suicide in CA in 1843 and she returned to her parents homeat Oregon City where she married Daniel Harvey.
"
HARVEY, ELOISA, (McLOUGHLIN)--Born in Fort William, on the northern shore of Lake Superior, Feb. 13, 1817. Her father was Dr. John McLoughlin, then physician at her birthplace, which was a post of the Northwest Fur Company. Her mother was the widow of Alexander McKay, John Jacob Astor s partner in the Pacific Fur Company. Father and daughter came overland to Oregon in 1824, the latter having been, undoubtedly, the first female to cross the continent. In 1838 Miss McLoughlin married at Vancouver, William Glen Kae, an employee of the Hudson s Bay Company, and lived with him at various trading posts until 1845, when he died at San Francisco. Their children were three, of whom Mrs. Theodore Wygant and Mrs. Joseph Myrick, of Portland, survive. She returned to Oregon and lived with her father until 1850, when she married Daniel Harvey, by whom she had three children Daniel Harvey, James W. McLoughlin Harvey, and Mrs. D. F. Leahy, all residents of Portland. Daniel Harvey, Sr., died in 1868, and his widow died in the fall of 1884, at her residence in Portland." [History of the Willamette Valley by Herbert Lang p.593]

1824 Dr. John MCLOUGHLIN (1784-1857): m'd Marguerite Wadin.  McLoughlin was Chief Factor of the Hudson's Bay Company, Columbia District, from 1825-1846.  He became quite prominent in the early history of Oregon.  Described as being 6`6" tall with long white hair, he used to wear a long blue cloak thrown around him.  On the one hand he had very courtly manners and on the other a very strong will that was prone to temper.  He was well thought of by most who knew him and aided many a traveler that stopped at his door
"McLOUGHLIN, JOHN, M.D.--Scotch by birth, and was employed as a physician by the Northwest Fur Company in the first quarter of this century, and was stationed for a time at their posts in Canada. On the consolidation of the two rival companies, Dr. McLoughlin was appointed, in 1823, chief factor on the west side of the Rocky Mountains, with headquarters at Vancouver, and came overland in 1824, bringing his family and a retinue of the Company s servants.  He served his employers with marked fidelity and an accurate and broad appreciation of his duties as a Christian. His conduct to the early American settlers was admirably humane, and showed that the claims of humanity outweighed mere business considerations of every degree. Americans of every stripe came to think well of him and to discriminate between his course of frankness and generosity, and the mercenary and heartless policy of his employers. When the directors of the Hudson's Bay Company rebuked him for his sympathy with, and toleration of the Americans, he resigned his position, and retiring to his land near Oregon City, died there in 1857. His opportunities for doing good were very great, and he made the most of them. In his place an ignorant or a bad man could have worked an infinity of mischief ; and it is to his credit that in spite of ingratitude from those he benefited, his life was full of good deeds. His kindness was ill-requited ; and he lived to be a witness of the classical maxim that republics are ungrateful, for the Government of Oregon deprived him of the valuable claim which he occupied at Oregon City. The life of Dr. McLoughlin, abounded with such incidents as form attractive reading; and his connection with and participation in the affairs of the great fur companies, and the new states and territories of the west, increase the importance of his actions.  The story of his life has never been written, but no doubt it will some time be fully told." [History of the Willamette Valley by Herbert Lang p.593-4]

1825  John MCLOUGHLIN Jr. (1812-1842):  s/o Dr. John and Marguerite (Wadin) McLoughlin.  John McLoughlin II was murdered in 1842 near Ft. Stikeen where he had taken charge with William Glen Rae in the winter of 1839-40. His body was later brought to Fort Vancouver for burial.

1825 Joseph MCLOUGHLIN (1809-1848): m'd Victoire McMillan.  Joseph was the oldest son of Dr. John McLoughlin and his first wife.  He studied abroad and returned to the area to serve as a clerk in the Hudson's Bay Company.  After a few years he left the service and settled as a farmer near Champoeg.  He was on the committee to draft a code of laws for the provisional government. He died from the effects of a fall over a cliff in the Umpqua region.

181? James MCMILLAN (1782-1858):  m'd c1820 Marguerite "Kol-a-ko-tak" Clatsop, d/o subchief Coboway of the Clatsop tribe.  McMillan was born in Scotland and was employed by the North West Fur Company prior to 1804.  He served as Chief Factor at Flathead House.  McMillan retired to spend his last days in Scotland, where he died in 1858.  His wife later married Louis Labonte.

1804 Pvt. Hugh MCNEAL: McNeal was a member of Lewis and Clark's "Corp of Discovery"

1814 Donald MCTAVISH ( -1814): McTavish was a fur trader with the North West Company came to the Oregon Territory by ship in April 1814.  He was accompanied by one Jane Barnes. On May 22, 1814, McTavish and four others drowned while crossing the Columbia River.

1813 John George MCTAVISH ( -1847): m'd Nancy McKenzie; m'd Englishwoman.  McTavish was an employee of the Northwest Company from 1798 until it joined with the Hudson Bay Company.  In the latter he was a Chief Factor who acted as a deputy governor in the absence of Governor George Simpson.  He had numerous children by several native wives but only those by his last metisse wife, Nancy McKenzie, seem to have made it into the records.  He left his last wife when he returned to Canada and married an English woman.  He died near Montreal in 1847.

1838 MEEK, Courtney (1838- ): m'd 1878 NEWTON, Delia
"MEEK, COURTNEY--Born in Oregon in 1838, the son of Joe Meek. Is a farmer, and resides three miles north of Hillsboro. He married Delia Newton in 1878, and their children's names are George and Josie."
[History of the Willamette Valley by Herbert Lang p.598]

1838 Joseph L. MEEK (1810-1875): m'd Virginia NezPerce.  Meek was in the service of the American Fur Company as a hunter and trapper.  He was with Sublette in 1829.  Around 1840 he settled on the Tualatin Plains.  He is buried in the Presbyterian Church Cemetery, Hillsboro, OR
 
"MEEK, JOSEPH L.--Born in Washington County, Virginia, in 1810 ; left home at the age of eighteen and went westward to Louisville and St. Louis, and joined Sublettes hunting party, and set out in March, 1829, upon the plains, and for many years thereafter led the life of a hunter and trapper. (For particulars of his life in the mountains and subsequently, see `River of the West'. In 1841 Meek settled in the Tualatin Plains, in Washington County, and made that his home until his death on the 20th of June, 1875." [History of the Willamette Valley by Herbert Lang p.597-8]

1837 Alfred Jacob MILLER: Miller was an American artist employed by Sir William Drummond Stewart to depict scenes on his expedition.

1811 Joseph MILLER: Miller was an overland Astorian

1813 Richard MILLIGAN: Milligan was a tailor with the Pacific Fur Co.

1813 Joseph MOCHCOMAU: Mochcomau was a hunter with the Northwest Company.

1813 Antoine MOINEAU: Moineau was an employee of the Northwest Company.

1811 Ovide MONTIGNY: m'd Josephte Fagnon.  Montigny was an interpreter, clerk, and Astorian with the Pacific Fur Co. He arrived on the Tonquin and was mentioned by Franchere as occupied at Astoria in trading and various other errands.  He narrowly missed the destruction of the Tonquin, having begged off from sailing north because of his proneness to sea-sickness.  He was as Fort Okanogan, then at Thompson River, listed as gouvernail and interpreter.  His son, Narcisse, was employed by the Hudsons Bay Company at Vancouver and shows up in early church records for that area.

1812 Nicholas MONTOUR : m'd Anne Tabeau; m'd Marguerite/Susanne Cree; m'd Ann/Susanne Humpherville.  Nicholas was the metis son of Nicholas Montour, a partner in the North West Company.  He was employeed periodically as a clerk in the various fur companies.  Montour  was recorded as a good clerk but indolent and unreliable.  For a time he held land near present day Gervais but appears to have relinquished it.

1838 Jean Baptiste MONTREUIL: Montreuil was one of the crew who managed to save himself in the brigade disaster of October 24, 1838 at the Dalles des Morts when the first priests were coming to the west coast.  He was a witness, after the arrival of the brigade at Fort Vancouver, to the marriages of three fellow engages.  Nothing more is heard of him.

1811 John M. MUMFORD: Mumford was a Second Mate on the Tonquin. He missed the destruction of the Tonquin when the Captain dismissed him and set him off on shore prior to leaving.

1811 Joseph NADEAU:  Madeau was a voyageur and Astorian with the Pacific Fur Company.  He arrived on the Tonquin and drowned at the mouth of the Columbia River while attempting a crossing.   "We especially regretted the loss of the two Lapensee and Joseph Nadeau.  At their departure from Montreal, these young men had been entrusted by their parents to the particular care of Mr. McKay, and by their good conduct they had acquired the esteem of the captain, the crew, and all the passengers. "

1804 John NEWMAN: Newman was a member of the Lewis and Clark "Corp of Discovery".  He received 75 lashes and was expelled from the party.  It is not known if he ever made it to the Oregon Territory.

1812 C.A. NICHOLS: Nichols was a Pacific Fur Company employee who arrived on the ship Beaver.

1834 Thomas NUTTALL: Nuttall was a member of Wyeth's second expedition,  He was a botanist from Harvard College who had come along to document plant and animal life.

1813 Thomas OCANASAWARET:  Thomas was an employee of the North West Company.

OGDEN FAMILY RESEARCHER 
1818 Peter Skene OGDEN (1784-1854): m'd Julia Spokane.  Ogden was one of the best known traders and Chief Factors of the west.  He was sometimes called "Utah" because of his Snake River expeditions, or "M'sieu Pete" as a term of regard.  He ransomed the survivors of the Whitman Massacre and brought them down to Fort Vancouver.  After a term of service as Chief Factor he retired to Oregon City, building a good home, "The Cliffs", near the falls.  He died in 1854 and is buried in Mountain View Cemetery with a memorial marker erected years later.  

1834 James A. O'NEIL (1800-1874): m'd 1855 Tabitha C. Bowman.  O'Neil came with Wyeth's second expedition.  He was one of a party of 11 that sailed on the Loriot in January 1837 to obtain cattle in CA for the Willamette Cattle Co. O'Neil helped establish Provisional Government.  He had studied law to some extent in NY and became a judge and a  justice of the peace for Yamhill Co.  He built first the grist mill in Polk County in 1845 but later sold the mill and built and ran a store at Tampico.  O'Neil died near  Lewisville in Polk County Sep 1874 and was buried on his farm.  When the farm sold he was removed to Hart Cemetery.

1804 Sgt. John ORDWAY: Ordway was a member of Lewis and Clark's "Corp of Discovery".

183? Louis OSSANT: (see Louis OZAN)

1810 Jean Baptiste OUVRE aka Ouvrie (1792-1849): m1. ; m2. 1839 Jany Tioult (aka Catchina Genevieve Sempson).  Ouvre was a middleman from Montreal who joined the Pacific Fur Company as an overland Astorian.  He remained in the west and was invaluable to Tolmie on the northward tour in 1833 as a messenger, nurse, advisor and aritrator of Indian quarrels.  He was stationed for a time at Nisqually.  He died at that place in 1849. Ouvre was the father of Marie Anne (1827), Louise (1834), Therese (1836) and Baptiste (1839)

1813 Etienne OWAYAISSA: Etienne was an employee of  the North West Company.

1836  John and Mary OWYHEE: The suspiciously generic names of 2 Hawaiian assistants at the Whitman Mission. They returned to the Islands, June 1838 (to many of the Hawaiians the Northwest was a drastic change of climate). "Nina" and "Green" are also assistants at the mission [roster, Narcissa Whitman]. Hawaiians, called Kanakas or "Blue Men" began sailing on trading ships to Oregon, California, the British/Russian outposts, and South America around 1788. King Kameharneha (in power 1810) pursued a policy of encouraging travel for Hawaiian education in economics and Christianity. Hawaiians worked for the Pacific Fur Company, the Northwest Company, for Nathaniel Wyeth, Jason Lee, and for the Whitmans. Oregon Territorial Law, 1848, imposed a special tax on Hawaiians' employers. Most Hawaiians left Oregon after the 1850 Oregon Donation Land Act forbit land-ownership to anyone except whites and half-Indians. [from Dodds, an excellent source on Oregon history.]

OZAN FAMILY RESEARCHER
183? Louis OZAN (c1800-1856): m1. died c. 1830; m2. 1839 Catherine KOHASSA (Cayuse); m3. 1848 Mary MOLALLA. Louis is found listed in the Hudson Bay Company records under the spelling OZAN (as was the first member of his family to come from France), however, the early church and territory records list him under Ossant, Aussent, Ossin and Osant.  He was with Samuel Black in the Rocky Mountains of Canada in 1824.  Black reportedly commented that he did not trust him, claiming he was easily led by others to desert.  He was an engagé in the party of hunters.  Formerly of Sorel, Canada, Louis came to OR territory c1830s.  He became a citizen in 1851 in order to qualify for a donation land claim. He retired to a claim north of St. Louis, Marion Co, OR in 1840. His second marriage was officially performed in 1839 when the priests arrived but it is unknown how long he was with Catherine prior to that time. Louis was the father of Rosalie (1827), Louis (1832), Josephte (1838) and Francois (1839).

1825 Pierre Chrysolugue PAMBRUN (1792-1841): m'd Catherine "Kitty" HUMPERVILLE.  Pambrun was already a long-term employee of the HBC, having joined the service in 1815 when he was sent to Fort Walla Walla as a clerk.  He was Chief Factor of Fort Walla Walla from 1839-1841 when he he died from a fall off a horse. His daughter, Harriet, stayed with the Whitmans in the winters of 1837-38 and 1839-40. The widow Pambrun, and their 9 children, sheltered at Waiilatpu for a time after Pambrun's death.  They moved to the Willamette Valley leaving Harriet, the youngest, with the Whitmans. Daughter Maria Pambrun married Dr. Forbes Barclay in 1842. Pambrun was originally buried at Ft. Walla Walla but was later reinterred at Fort Vancouver.  Pambrun was the father of Andrew (1822), Maria (1826), Alexandre (1830), Thomas (1833), Adele (1835), Henriette (1837), Sara (1841-1844) and  Jean Baptiste (1839) See also: Pierre and Catherine Pambrun, emigrants of 1825

1811 Antoine PAPIN:  Papin was a Pacific Fur Company employee and an overland Astorian

1838 Pierre PAPIN dit Lachance (1820-1888): m'd Suzanne GOODRICH. Pierre Papin dit Lachance arrived at Ft. Vancouver, from Montreal, Canada in 1838 and was employed as a blacksmith.  He settled in Marion County in 1843 and raised a large family (Pierre, Julien, Julie, Marie, Joseph, Celestine, Clementine, Adolpine, Delmer Jeanne, Unnamed Twin of Thomas, Thomas, Eleanore, Marceline and Narcisse David).  In his final years he lived at Grand Ronde where he died in 1888.  He is buried in St. Patrick's Cemetery

PARISEAU FAMILY RESEARCHER
1832 Pierre PARISEAU (1820- ): m'd 1850 Marie DOMPIERRE. s/o Jean Baptiste and Francoise (Aleric) Pariseau of Montreal, Canada.  Pariseau came west as an employee of the Hudson Bay Company where he was employed to help build and man Old Fort Umpqua.  In 1850 he married Marie Dompierre and took out a Donation Land Claim in Marion county.  He hated being "crowded" by civilization and spent most of his later years in the Douglas Co back country.  He was the father of 11 children (Catherine, Charles Pierre, Francois, Jean Baptiste, Joseph, Louis, Marguerite, Marie, Pascal, Paul, Pierre, and Rachel).  Many of these children can be found in the early census records under the phonetic spelling Parazoo.

1835 Rev. Samuel PARKER (1779-1866): Parker was a Congregational clergyman. He and Marcus Whitman came west in 1835 looking for a mission site among the Indians. Marcus Whitman returned east to organize the mission and Rev. Parker continued to explore with Compo, his interpreter. He spent the winter of 1835-36 at Fort Vancouver.

1813 Francois PAYETTE: Payette was a Pacific Fur Co employee.

1809 Archibald PELTON: Pelton came to the northwest with Andrew Henry to establish a fort.  When the residents of Fort Henry were  massacred, Pelton was the lone survivor.  He wandered the wilderness from tribe to tribe for three years before he was picked up by the overland Astorias headed by McKenzie and McClellan.  By that time he was quite deranged with periodic moments of lucidity.  He was able to tell him his name and that he was from CT.

1813 Joseph PELTON: Pelton was a Pacific Fur Co employee who was captured and held prisoner by the Indians for about 60 days before going crazy. Francois Payette later rescued him.

1816 William Peone William Pion joined the HBC in approximately 1828.  He was the son of William Peone a French Canadian and Quichinemalese of the Spokane tribe

PEPIN: see PAPIN

1837 Rev. Henry Kirk White PERKINS (1812 - ): m'd 1837 Elvira JOHNSON.  Perkins arrived in September 1837 as part of the second  reinforcements for the Methodist Mission.  He established Wascopam, a mission at the Dalles, with Daniel Lee.  Perkins returned to the states in 1844.

1830 Jean Baptiste PERRAULT ( -bef 1857): m1. Chinook woman (d/o Chief Coboway) ; m2. 1839 Angele Tichailis.  Perrault was a boatman with the Hudson's Bay Company.  He settled on French Prairie near the mouth of the Yamhill on the east side of the Willamette.

1813 William PERRAULT: Guilleaume Perrault was a boy who was a boy who arrived on the Tonquin with the Pacific Fur Company.

183? Amable PETIT (1797-1867): m1.  ; m2. 1837 Susanne Tawakon.  Appears Amable had two half-grown sons who were in eastern Canada when he came west.  His children by his second marriage are Charles, Henri, Celeste, Marie, Pierre, Francois, Louise Philomene, Louis and Flavie.  He died at St. Paul and is buried in the St. Paul Cemetery, St. Paul, Marion County, OR.

PICARD FAMILY RESEARCHER:
182?
Andre PICARD (1781-1846): m1. Okanogan woman; m2. Marguerite (Marie) Okanogan; Picard joined the North West Fur Company in 1800.    He was employed as a postmaster at Kamloops during the 1820s.  Picard was one of the earlier settlers on French Prairie.  He was the father of Emilie (1821), Unnamed daughter (by first wife), Jean Baptiste (1830), Basile (1833), Henri and Regis (1836).  Andre is buried at St. Paul Cemetery, St. Paul, Marion County, OR.

1813 Maurice PICARD: Picard was an employee of the North West Fur Company.

183? Louis PICHETTE dit Dupre (1797-1876): m'd Marguerite Bercier.  Pichette (aka Pichet, Dupre) was a long time employee of the Hudson's Bay Company.  He settled on French Prairie on Champoeg Creek where he  became the farther of twenty-one children including Edouard (1829),  Louis (1832), Dominique (1837), Roc (1838), Esther (1840), Mary (1853), Louise,

182? Francois PIETTE dit Faignant (c1800- ): m'd Felicite Sassete. Piette was an employee of Hudson's Bay Company who was with Ogden in the Snake River country in 1824-26 and with McLeod on the Umpqua River in 1826-27.

1811 Francis Benjamin PILLETTE: Pillette was a clerk and Astorian with the Pacific Fur Company.  He arrived on the Tonquin.

1812 Jean Baptiste PILLON: Pillon was a Pacific Fur Company employee and an overland Astorian.

182? Joseph PIN (1794-c1840): m'd Marguerite Pend d'Oreille.  Pin was an employee of the Hudson's Bay Company who was with Ogden in the Snake River country in 1824 and at Fort Langley in 1829.  He was the father of Jean Baptiste (1833), Francois (1836) and Marguerite (1839).

1813 Louis PION: Pion was a Pacific Fur Company employee.

1837 Anna Maria PITTMAN (1803-1838): m'd Rev. Jason LEE.   Anna Maria came to Oregon in May 1837 and married Jason Lee
July 16, 1837.  She died June 26, 1838 after the birth of their first child. The child, too, died soon after birth. They were buried in a single grave at the mission near present day Keizer, OR but were later moved to the
Lee Mission Cemetery
in what is now Salem.
"LEE, ANN MARIA (PITMAN)--Sailed from New York in July, 1836 ; landed in Oregon, June,1837; married July 16th, to Rev. Jason Lee, and died June 26, 1838 ; died when her first-born child was ten days old, and is buried with it in the Lee Cemetery, at Salem. The headstone oftheir grave bears the inscription "Beneath this sod, the first broken in Oregon for the reception of white mother and child, lie the remains of Ann Maria Pitman Lee.." [History of the Willamette Valley by Herbert Lang p.596]

PLAMONDON FAMILY RESEARCHER:
1827
Simon PLAMONDON (1800-c1900): m1.  SCANEWA, Thas-e-muth(Veronica); m2. FINLAY, Emelie (widow of Pierre Bercier); m3. PELLETIER, Louise Henriette. m4. TILIKISH, Kitty (common law wife). Plamondon was one of the original settlers on Cowlitz Prairie in what is now Washington. He was described as being tall and handsome and he won the admiration of leaders in the Cowlitz Tribe.  He was an employee of the Hudson's Bay Company and worked for a time at the Company Farm at Cowlitz until his retirement.

1813 Antoine PLANTE: Antoine was a Pacific Fur Company employee.

183? Charles PLANTE (1784-1854): m'd 1839 Agathe Cayuse; m'd Susanne Cayuse, m'd Elizabeth Chinook; m'd Pelagie Chinook; m'd Marguerite Yougoulhta (widow of Jean Baptiste Dubreuil).

1835 Francis PLEY (1811-1884): "Death of an 1835 Pioneer--Francis Pley, who died on North Coos river last Thursday, was an uncle of N. Dufrene, with whom he was residing at the time of his death. Pley was born in Calais, France, in 1811, and immigrated to the United States in 1832. For 20 years thereafter his occupation was that of a whaler, and he entered the bay of San Francisco for the first time in 1835. In 1848-9, during the height of the California gold excitement, Pley was captain of a vessel plying between San Francisco and the Sandwich islands. In 1851 he became a resident of Shoalwater bay, from which place he moved to Jacksonville in 1852. It was Pley who christened Josephine county, in remembrance of "the girl he left behind." In 1855 Pley returned to California, after which he extended his travels through some of the western states. Pley arrived here about a month ago, at which time he was in enjoyment of good health. Subsequently he was attacked with inflammation of the stomach, which caused his death.” [The Coast mail (Marshfield, Ore), July 31, 1884 pg. 3] [contributed by Robin Greenlund]

182? Basile POIRIER (1774-1844): m1. Canadian woman ; m2. Helene Celiast Clatsop; m3. Louise Moatwas; Poirier was a baker for Fort Vancouver.  Poirier came with his brother Toussaint listed below.  He died suddenly on his farm near Portland.  Poirier was the father by his second wife of Xavier (1823), Francois (1835), Alexandre (1831) and by his third wife Basile (1834), Joseph (1837), Pierre (1838) and Angele (1840).

182? Toussaint POIRIER (1782-1850): m'd 1839 Catherine Clatsop.  Poirier came to Fort Vancouver with his brother Basile.  He was listed as a cooper and a miller in early records.  By 1844 he was living on French Prairie and was excempt from taxes due to the fact he was a "blind, invalid".  He was the father of Marie (1826), Antoine (1831), Louis (1836) and Rose (1838).

1804 Pvt. John POTTS (1776-1808): Potts was a member of Lewis and Clark's "Corp of Discovery".

1836 Narcissa PRENTISS (1808-1847): m'd Dr. Marcus WHITMAN; Narcissa was with Presbyterian Missionary party and was one of the first women over the Rocky Mountains.  She was killed in the Whitman Massacre in 1847. Her daughter, Alice Clarisa Whitman, was drowned in June 1839. OHS: MSS#1204, misc papers, letters, diary available in collection at OHS.  See also the published "Letters of Narcissa Whitman" edited by Drury 

1812 Jean Baptiste PREVOST aka Proveau ( -1812): Prevost was a Pacific Fur Co employee and an overland Astorian.  At one time he was also an employee of the North West Fur Company. During the overland expedition he suffered greatly, became deranged due to starvation and drowned

182? Louis PROVOST (1806- ):

183? Charles PROULX (1816- ):  m1. 1839 Marie Chehalis (d. 1840); m2. 1846 Marie Chehalis.  s/o Antoine and Therese (Martel) Proulx. Charles came from Montreal to serve as a boatman between the Cascades and Fort Vancouver.

183? Francois PROULX: Francois was apparently related in some manner to Charles Proulx listed above, although not a brother.

1804 Sgt. Nathaniel PRYOR: Pryor was a member of Lewis and Clark's "Corp of Discovery".

1813 Amable QUESNEL:  Quesnel was an employee of the North West Fur Company.

QUINTAL FAMILY RESEARCHER:
182?
Laurent QUINTAL (1800-c1860):  m1. Charlotte Ladouceur; m2. Marie Anne Nipissing.  Quintal was with Alexander Ross on the Snake River in 1824 and with Tolmie at Nisqually.  In later years he settled in Douglas county with his rather large family.  He died one fall when he was bitten by a rattlesnake while binding wheat in his fields.

183? William Glen RAE ( -1846): m'd 1838 Maria Eloise McLoughlin.  Rae was educated in Edinburgh, Scotland and was a native of the Orkey Islands.  He was a trader for the Hudson's Bay Company at different posts from 1834-1837 and was then appointed head clerk of Fort Vancouver.  In 1840 he was sent to Stikeen River and in 1841 was sent to CA.  He shot himself in 1846 after becoming involved in insurrectionist plots in San Francisco.  His wife and three children returned home to Oregon City.

182? Peter RANNE ( -1828): Ranne died in the territory in 1828. No record for original date of arrival.

183? Narcisse RAYMOND aka Raimond, Remon (1816-bef 1887): m'd Pauline WallaWalla.  Raymond settled on land west of Walla Walla by the 1840s.  He was one of the most well known of the Frenchtown settlers and was elected sheriff of Walla Walla county in 1854 by the first Washington legislature.

183? Jean Baptiste REAL dit Rail (1794- ): Real was an employee of the Hudson's Bay Company.  In 1840 he was working at the Cowlitz farm under Roberts.  He appears on the 1850 Lewis county census for 1850.

1804 Moses REED: Reed was a member of Lewis and Clark's "Corp of Discovery".  He was expelled from the party and it is not known if he ever made it to the Oregon Territory.

1811 John REID aka Reed: Reid was a clerk in the employe of the Pacific Fur Company. His name is found as Reed in later records.

1812 Jacob RESNER aka Reznor ( -1814): Resner was a Pacific Fur Company employee and an overland Astorian.  He was robbed of all his possessions several times by the Indians and in the end he was killed in the Reed massacre.

1838 Mary RICHARDSON (1811-1897): m. 1838 Rev. Elkanah WALKER.  d/o Joseph and Charlotte (Thompson) Richardson.  Mary was with the Methodist Missionary reinforcements of 1838. OHS: MSS#1204, diary, typescript in collection at OHS.
"WALKER, MARY RICHARDSON.--
This venerable lady, who is unquestionably the leader of all living female immigrants to the region west of the Rocky Mountains, resides at present at Forest Grove, in the enjoyment of all her mental and most of her physical faculties. Like so many of the honored and venerated pioneers of this coast, Mrs. Walker was born in the State of Maine. The place of her nativity was the town of Baldwin, and the date was 1811. She became the wife of Rev. Elkanah Walker, and with him set out for the Pacific Slope, and after the usual adventures, hardships and misfortunes incident to the trip across the plains arrived, in the year 1838, on the Columbia. For nearly ten years Mr. and Mrs. Walker continued to reside at the Mission, a short distance below Fort Colville, and here some of their children were born. During all this time their existence was almost wholly with the Indians, no white people living within hundreds of miles, excepting Rev. C. Eells and family, who shared with the Walker family the discomforts of their life and lot. To the people of to-day it must seem wonderful and altogether inexplicable, how human beings as tenderly nurtured as the Walker and Eells families were, could live at all amid such surroundings, and the wonder increases when it is learned that ten years did not serve to dampen the ardor of these pious missionary people. Leaving Walker s Claims, as the locality of the mission was called, the Walker family removed in 1848, to the Willamette Valley, and have since made Washington County their home. Mr. Walker died in 1877. The children s names are, Cyrus H., Abigail B., Marcus W., Joseph E., John R., Levi C. and Samuel T." [History of the Willamette Valley by Herbert Lang p.598]

1806 Francois RIVET (1759-1852): m1.   m2. 1839 Theresa Flathead.  Rivert was a Canadian hunter and trapper for years before he joined the Lewis and Clark Expedition in 1804.  During the expedition he dropped off in the Rocky Mountains to fend for himself but came to the Oregon territory a few years later as an interpreter, brigade leader and "kind of a hedge blacksmith" for the Hudson's Bay Company.  He settled on a claim south of St. Paul, Marion Co, OR in 1852 and died later the same year. He was the father of Antoine (1816) and  Joseph (1811).

1811 Charles ROBERT: Robert was a crew member and sailor on the Tonquin.

1812 Francois ROBERT: Robert was a Pacific Fur Co employee and an overland Astorian.

1804 John ROBERTSON (1780- ): Robertson, of Fort Kaskaskia, was a member of Lewis and Clark's "Corp of Discovery".  He was demoted and expelled from the party and joined a trading party going to St. Louis.

1812 Edward ROBINSON: Robinson was a Pacific Fur Co employee and an overland Astorian. He was a friend of Resner.  He was robbed of all his possessions several times by the Indians and in the end he was killed in the Reed massacre.

183? Antoine ROCBRUNE (1810- ): s/o Antoine Rocbrune. Antoine Rocbrune was an engage with the Hudson's Bay Company.  He was listed as a boatman, as was his father.

183? Joseph ROCBRUNE: m'd Lisette WallaWalla; m2. Marguerite Souillier (widow of David Dompierre). Joseph Rocbrune was an engage with the Hudson's Bay Company.  Joseph was the father of Marie Celeste (1837), Joseph (1839), Olivier, Helene and  Roch.

183? Tanis ROCBRUNE: Tanis Rocbrune was an engage with the Hudson's Bay Company.

183? Augustin ROCHON (1817-1898):

1838 Edward RODGERS:

1834 Charles J. ROE (1806- ):  m1. 1837 Nancy McKay; m2. 1856 Angelica Metisse.  Roe was a member of Wyeth's second expedition.  Roe married married his first wife in a joint ceremony with Jason Lee and Cyrus Shepard.  He was considered somewhat of a religious fanatic. He murdered his second wife in 1859 in a fit of jealousy and was sentenced and hanged for his crime

1838 Cornelius ROGERS ( -1843): m'd 1842 Satira Leslie. Rogers was a teacher who taught at Lapwaii and Waiilatpu.  He married the daughter of David Leslie in 1842 and they were both drowned shortly afterwards when their canoe was swept over the falls at Oregon City.

182? Harrison ROGERS: Rogers died in the territory in 1828. No record found for his original date of arrival.

1813 Olivier ROI:  Olivier Roy was a Pacific Fur Co employee.

RONDEAU FAMILY RESEARCHER
1813 Charles RONDEAU (c1777-1855): m1. Lizette Bellaire (d.c1836);  m2. 1837 Portneuf; m3. 1838 Agathe Dupate (McKay); m4. 1849 Elizabeth Indian; Charles Rondeau was a trapper and hunter.  In 1804 he joined the Lewis and Clark Expedition as a guide.  Rondeau was found living among the Mandans by Lewis and Clark on their return east.  In 1815 he was an interpreter for the Northwest Company.  He seems to be found mainly in the Snake River country until his retirement in the 1840s when he took up a land claim on French Prairie near Gervais.  Rondeeu was the father of  Angelique (1829), George (1833), Genevieve (1835) and probably others.

182? Louis RONDEAU (1790-c1860): m'd Marguerite Tchinouk (former wife of Duncan McDougal).  Louis Rondeau was with Work in the Rockies in 1831.  His relationship to Charles Rondeau is unknown.  After the death of his wife about 1834 his young daughter, Marie, was raised in the home of Chief Factor James Douglas.  In later years Rondeau lived with his daughter at Baker's Bay.  He was buried near the mouth of the Columbia where Fort Columbia Park now stands.

1812 Edward ROSE:  Rose was a Pacific Fur Company employee and an overland Astorian.

1811 Alexander ROSS (1783-1856): m'd Sally Indian.  Ross was a Scotsman who migrated to Canada in 1804.  He spent his first few years in Canada as a school teacher until 1810 when he joined the Pacific Fur Company as a clerk.  He was an Astorian who arrived on the Tonquin.    Ross later joined the North West company (which later became part of the Hudson's Bay Company) and eventually settled at the new Red River settlement in Manitoba where he was a prime force in the city that later became known as Winnipeg.  In 1848 his story of the Astor adventure was published as "Adventures of the First Settlers on the Oregon".  In edition his "Fur Hunter of the Far West" was published in 1855.

Charles ROSS FAMILY RESEARCHER
1838 Charles ROSS: m'd Isabelle Unknown. Ross emigrated from Red River settlement to Ft. Vancouver in 1838 where he was a factor with the Hudson Bay Company.  He later helped build Fort Victoria.

1838 Isabelle ROSS: m'd Charles ROSS.  Isabelle emigrated from Red River with her husband to settle at Fort Vancouver

1838 Katherine ROSS (1832-1916): d/o Charles and Isabelle Ross.  Katherine died at Tacoma, WA.

1811 Augustin ROUSSELLE: Augustin Rouselle was a blacksmith  with the Pacific Fur Company.  He arrived on the Tonquin.

1811 Benjamin ROUSSELLE: Benjamin Rousselle was a voyageur and Pacific Fur Company employee. He arrived on the Tonquin.

183? Thomas ROY (1794-1852): m'd 1838 Marie Lafleur

1832 Osborne RUSSELL (1814-1892): Never Married.  Russell ran away at age 16 and shipped out on sailing vessel.  He deserted at NY and joined the fur trade.  In 1834 he joined Wyeth's second expedition.  Russell helped build Ft. Hall and then spent the next eight years trapping and hunting from there.  After Wyeth's venture failed he joined two expeditions as camp tender under Joseph Gale.  After years of hunting he made up his mind to "go to the mouth of the Columbia and settle in the Willamette or Multnomah Valley".  He joined Dr. White's company coming from the east.  When helping to build a flour mill in June 1842 a rock said to weigh 60# struck him on the right side of the face, throwing him six feet backward.  Bits of rock had penetrated his right eye, destroying it.  Russell was  referred to as a man who "always remained true to his principles; man of education, refined feelings and exceptional ability".  He was on the executive committee to form the Provisional government and was named as one of original trustees of University at Forest Grove.  In later years he returned to CA and spent many years near Placerville.  In May 1884 he entered Eldorado County hospital with miner's rheumatism.  His death occurred there Aug 2, 1892.  He was buried in the hospital cemetery in unmarked grave.

1838 Catherine RUSSIE: m1. 1834 Andre Chalifou Sr.; m2. Hyacinthe Comartin.  d/o Augustin Russie.  Catherine came from Canada to the Oregon Territory with her first husband.

1804 SACAGAWEA : Indian wife of Toussaint Charbonneau; member of Lewis and Clark's "Corp of Discovery"

1811 Joseph SAMANT: Samant was an employee of the Pacific Fur Company and an Astorian.

1813 Michel SANSON: Sanson was a blacksmith with the Pacific Fur Company.

SAUNDERS FAMILY RESEARCHER
1828 Jean Alexandre SAUNDERS aka John Sanders (1800-1874): m1. Catherine Tchinouk ; m2. 1838 Susanne Gameville aka Tkope;  m3. 1842 Lizette Des Dalles.  Saunders settled on French Prairie in Marion County after retirement from Hudson Bay Company.  He is buried in St. Louis Cemetery, St. Louis, Marion Co, OR.  Father of Marguerite (1837), Marie Anne (1830), Sophie (1834) and Andre (1839) by his second wife.

1836  Mrs. SATTERLEE: Mrs. Satterlee is listed as a member of the Whitman party who died on the Trail at the Platte River.

182? Laurent SAUVE dit Laplante (1784-1858): m1. Josephte Tsik.  m2. Francois WallaWalla.  Sauve was dairyman and cowherd for the Hudson's Bay Company on what later bore a misspelled version of his name " Sauvies Island ".  In 1844 he retired to French Prairie where he remained until his death in 1858.

183? James Allan SCARBROUGH aka Jacques A. Scarborough (1805-1855): m'd Ann Elizabeth Tchinouk (Paley Temaikamae). s/o James and Ann Scarborough of the County of Essex in England.  Scarborough joined the Hudson's Bay Company in 1829 as an officer on the Isabella.  He later served on the Lama and the Beaver and was Captain of the Cadboro and Mary Dare.  in 1843 he took up a claim at Chinook Point at the mouth of the Columbia where he reportedly had a fine farm with excellent fruit trees and a large herd of cattle.

181? Jacques SERVANT (1795-1854): m'd 1842 Josette Unknown.  Servant settled in Marion county.

1812 Alfred SETON: Seton was a clerk with the Pacific Fur Company.  He arrived on the ship Beaver and by 1814 was stationed at the post at Champoeg.

1804 Pvt. George SHANNON (1785-1836): Shannon was the youngest member of Lewis and Clark's "Corp of Discovery".  

1834 Cyrus SHEPARD (1799-1840): m'd 1837 Susan DOWNING.  Shepard came with the Jason Lee party in 1834.  He was a well thought of teacher at the Jason Lee Mission school. Cyrus died three years after arrival of complications from an amputation. He was buried at the Mission and later moved to Lee Mission Cemetery, Salem, Marion County, OR.  OHS: MSS# 1219, 85pp diary in collection of OHS.

1804 Pvt. John SHIELDS (1769-1809): Shields was a member of Lewis and Clark's "Corp of Discovery".

1824 Governor George SIMPSON: Simpson was field manager of Hudson's Bay Co's Northern Dept.  He visited the Pacific Northwest in 1824.

183? John SIMPSON ( -1842): This may be the son of Governor George Simpson and his country wife.  He died 19 Jun 1842 and was buried in the cemetery at Fort Vancouver.

1832 John SINCLAIR: Sinclair was a member of Wyeth's first overland expedition.  He suffered severly from fever and ague and left Oregon on the brig Dryad on Oct 18, 1833.  There is no indication he ever returned.

183? William A. SLACUM: Slacum was appointed Congressional investigative agent to Oregon in January, 1837 after testimony before Congress by H.J. Kelley about the "mistreatment" of Americans in the Northwest.  It appears he was already in the area as he was involved in the effort to bring cattle from CA in 1835.

182? Patrick SMALL (c1785-1846): m'd Nancy Hughes.  s/o Patrick and Indian (Cree) Small.  Small was described as a good trader, although deficient in education.  One of his sisters was married to David Thompson.  He was a clerk at Fort Carleton in 1838 when the priests passed through and baptized his family. He was the father of Helen (1814), Nancy (1818),  Charlotte (1821), Amelia (1824), Carolina (1827), William (1829), Elizabeth (1831) and Maria (1835)

1838 Rev. Asa H. SMITH:  m'd Sarah Gilbert White. Rev. Smith was sent out by the American Board of Foreign Missions to serve as a missionary in the area.  The couple returned east in c1841 due to the poor health of Sarah.

1828 Jedediah Strong SMITH (1799-1831):  s/o Jedediah Smith Sr. Jedediah Smith was born in NY and became one of the more well known of the explorers and traders in the west.  He joined William Ashley's fur trading adventure in 1822 as a "greenhorn" and over the years gained the respect of all those around him.  During his lifetime he avoided several massacres that left others around him dead.   He was killed in 1831 during an Indian attack.

1837 Margaret Jewett SMITH (c1812-1882): m1. 1839 Dr. William J. BAILEY (divorced 1854); m2. 1855 Francis Weddle (divorced 1858); m3. Mr. Crane. Margaret Smith came in 1837 as part of the reinforcements for the Willamette Mission. She returned to states in 1842 to visit on the Brig Chenamus.  She returned to Oregon again a year later.  Margaret was highly critical of the Methodist missionaries and the work they were doing. She was an authoress and became widely known for her thinly disguised biography "The Grains".

1832 Solomon Howard SMITH (1809-1876): m'd 1840 Celiast (Helene) Clatsop.   Smith was a New Englander of good education and an adventurous nature.  As a young man he had attended military school and had also obtained some medical training.  He joined Wyeth's Expedition in 1832.  Smith arrived at Fort Vancouver in October of that year and went to work as a teacher at the fort.  While there he became involved with Celiast, the Indian wife of the Fort's baker. She left her husband and joined Smith at Gervais where he again taught school for a couple of years.  In 1836 he helped Ewing Young build a grist mill.  In 1840 he formally married Celiast and they moved to the Clatsop Plains near the mouth of the Columbia.  He farmed,, kept a store and was serving as a State Legislature when he died.

1830 Thomas SMITH (c1808- ): m'd 1844 Marguerite Nesqually.  Thomas Smith was listed as a metis engage with the Hudson's Bay Company who was in the Columbia District in 1830 and in the Walla Walla country in 1831.  He was back at Fort Vancouver in 1844 when he married Marguerite.

1810 Capt. William SMITH: Capt. Smith sailed into the Columbia  in May 1810 on the ship "Albatross".  He set up a post near Oak Point but it was flooded out in July of the same year.  He left, only to return the next year bringing Wilson Price Hunt from the Sandwich Islands.

1836 Rev. Henry Harmon SPALDING (1803- ): m'd 1833 Eliza HART.  Spalding was a Presbyterian minister that came overland with the Marcus Whitman party and established a mission at Lapwai amongst the Nez Perce.  After the Whitman Massacre in 1847 he moved into the valley and in 1849 took up a land claim in Linn County. 

1811 Alexander STEWART: Stewart was an employee of the North West Company.

1811 Joseph ST. AMANT:  St. Amant was a guide with the fur companies.  He was an employee of the Pacific Fur Co and an overland Astorian.  He later went to work for the North West Company with the stipulation that he was free to hunt on Willamette in the winter.

1818 Pierre St. GERMAIN (1765-aft 1850):  Pierre St. Germain appears to have been an interpreter for the Hudson's Bay Company in 1818 and was a member of the earlier expedition to the Artic regions.  He may have been the "Soteaux St. Germain" who was with Work in 1830-31.

1838 Andre St. MARTIN (1810- ): m'd 1839 Catherine Towaka. s/o Pierre and Francoise (Peloquin) St. Martin.  Andre was an employee of the Hudson's Bay Company.  He was stationed at Fort Vancouver in 1839 when he married Catherine.  After Andre retired the family settled in Lewis County, Washington. Andre was the father of Pierre (1839), Isidore (1841), Andre (1846) and Francois (1848).

1811 Joseph ST. MARTIN ( -bef 1839): m'd Indian Tchinouk. Joseph St. Martin was a Northwest Fur Co employee.  It may have been him that was with Thompson in Montana in 1808.  He came to Fort George at Astoria in 1811 and was mentioned by Ross in 1814.   When his daughter, Genevieve was baptized in 1839 he was noted as the "late" Joseph "Martin"

1812 Louis ST. MICHEL: St. Michel was a Pacific Fur Co employee and an overland Astorian.

Sir William Drummond STEWART (1795-1871):  Sir William Drummond Stewart was a Scottish nobleman who was drawn to the adventure of North America and the west.   Upon his arrival he made the acquaintance of some of the early trappers and outfitters for the Rocky Mountain Fur Company.  He joined forces with them and is found throughout the west in the 1830s with various hunting expeditions, including a visit to Ft. Vancouver and the Willamette Valley with Wyeth in 1834.  [portrait as painted by Alfred Jacob Miller]

1811 Alexander STUART: Stuart was a partner in the North West Company.

1811 David STUART (c1765-1853): David Stuart was a Scotsman and the uncle of Robert Stuart mentioned below.  He emigrated to North America prior to 1800.  He joined the Pacific Fur Co in 1810 and was one of those Astorians who arrived on the Tonquin. Stuart helped Alexander Ross set up the post at Okanogan.  He continued in the employee of Astor's American Fur Company, retiring in 1833.  He died 18 Oct 1853 at the home of his nephew's widow in Detroit.

1811 Robert STUART ( -1848): Robert Stuart was a Scotsman  and a nephew of David Stuart, mentioned above.  He was briefly a clerk with the Northwest Fur Co. before joining the Pacific Fur Co. He was an Astorian who arrived on the Tonquin and remained with Astor throughout his career.  He was Astor's agent at Michilmackinac 1819-1834 when he retired.  He died 28 Oct 1848 in Chicago.. [ published a book, republished in 1935, New York, P.A. Rollins, editor, "Discovery of the Oregon Trail"]

1834  Milton SUBLETTE: Milton Sublette accompanied Wyeth's expedition in 1834 to build Fort Hall.  He went on to Fort Walla Walla and to Fort Vancouver.  He was a well known trader and trapper.

1830 William Lewis SUBLETTE: In 1823 William Sublette joined Gen. William Ashley's to trap beaver.  He split off with 11 other men to explore the Rocky Mountains and crossed the continent with Jedediah Smith.  The Smith-Jackson-Sublette Expedition of 1830 was the beginning for the Oregon Trail.

1838 Capt John August SUTTER: Sutter traveled overland to Oregon in 1838.  He sailed to the Sandwich Islands and to the Russian settlement at Sitka before sailing down to the coast to become in 1839, one one of California's most famous residents.  He established Sutters Mill (later famous as the site of the discovery that led to the gold rush) on the Sacramento River.

1811 Jack TAR: Tar was a crew member and sailor on the Tonquin.  He deserted at the Sandwich Islands.  It is not known if he ever visited the Pacific Northwest.

1807 David THOMPSON: Thompson was a Northwest Company employee, a geographer, an explorer and a trader who departed from Canada in 1807 to explore the Columbia all the way to the ocean.

1804 Pvt. John B. THOMPSON: Thompson was a member of Lewis and Clark's "Corp of Discovery".

1811 Capt. Jonathan THORN ( -1811): Thorn was the ill-tempered captain of the Tonquin and was responsible for bringing the Astorians to the Northwest Coast in 1811.  He was described by Alexander Ross thus: "Captain Thorn had many good qualities--was brave, had the manners of a gentleman, and was an able and experienced seaman; but his temper was cruel and overbearing, and his fate verifies the sacred decress, that `he shall have judgment without mercy, that hath showed no mercy'. "

1834 Mr. THORNBURG ( -1835): Thornburg was a tailor with Wyeth's second expedition.  He was described as being a reckless troublemaker and alcholic. On July 4, 1835 he was shot by Thomas Jefferson Hubbard in argument over Indian girl.  It was declared self-defense.

1832 Calvin TIBBETTS ( -1849): Tibbetts was a stonecutter from Maine.  He was a member of Wyeth's first overland expedition.  In 1840 he was living near Champoeg but by 1841he had joined Solomon Smith on Clatsop Plains near mouth of the Columbia.  Tibbetts went to California with the US Exploring Expedition under Lt. Emmons in Sept. 1841.  It appears he was back and forth to California several times.  In 1849, while returning on the ship Forrest from a trip to the gold mines, he died of cholera.  He was buried at sea August 1849.

1833 Dr. William Frazer TOLMIE (1812-1886): m'd Miss Work (d/o John Work).  Tolmie arrived at Astoria May 1, 1833.  He was employed with the Hudson's Bay Company as physician.  Tolmie was sent to Puget Sound until 1836 and then served at Fort Vancouver until 1841. From 1841 to 1844 he was on leave in Europe.  Upon his return he was sent to Nisqually as Superintendent of the Puget Sound Agricultural Company.  In 1846 he served as a member of provisional legislature of of Lewis County (now part of the state of Washington.)  He moved to Victoria, British Columbia in 1859 and retired from the company in 1870.

182? Jean Baptiste TOUPIN (c1792-1862): m'd Marguerite Lagaivoise (Madame Dorion).  Toupin was the third husband of Madame Dorion.  He reportedly was an interpreter at Fort Nez Perce since 1821, a member of John Work's group.

1834 John Kirk TOWNSEND: Townsend was a member of Wyeth's second expedition.  He was one of America's first scientists to visit Oregon overland.  Born in Philadelphia, he was a physician and a naturalist.

1834 Eldbridge TRASK (1815-1863): m1. 1842 Mrs. Hannah Able.  Trask arrived on the ship "May Dacre" as part of agreement with Nathaniel Wyeth.  He signed on as a trapper for Wyeth and began his life as a mountain man; for more information see Elbridge Trask by Juel M. Trask.  In 1852 he settled on a donation land claim near Tillamook, OR

1813 Francois TREPAGNIER: Trepagnier was a Pacific Fur Company employee.

1812 Jean Baptiste TURCOTTE: Turcotte was a Pacific Fur Company employee and an overland Astorian.

1832 John TURNER: Turner was an American trapper who joined the trapping party to California under Laframboise for a year.  By 1840 he is found living in the Willamette Valley.

1804 Ebenezer TUTTLE (1773- ): Tuttle was a member of Lewis and Clark's "Corp of Discovery".

181? Louis Joseph VAGNIER aka Vernier: m'd c 1814 Marguerite Lagaivoise (Madame Dorion).  Vagnier was the second husband of Madame Dorion.  He was the father of her daughter, Marguerite, who was born c1821.  He was an employee of the Hudson's Bay Company and was on several of the brigades.  Little more is known of him.

1811 Andrew VALLE: Valle was an employee of the Pacific Fur Company and an overland Astorian.

1792 Capt. George VANCOUVER (1757-1798): Vancouver led an exploring expedition for the British that arrived in Oct 1792.

1811 Egbert VANDERHUFF: Vanderhuff was the tailor on the Tonquin.

1811 Peter VERSHEL: Vershel was a crew member and sailor on the Tonquin.

1820 Pierre WAGNER (c1796-1865): m'd 1839 Marie Stomis (Tchinouk).  Wagner was employed by the Hudson's Bay Company as a butcher at Fort Vancouver.  After his retirement he settled on French Prairie in Marion County.  He was the father of Marie Anne (1829), Rose (1837), Marie (1838), Elizabeth (1840) and Marguerite (1844-1851).

Courtney Walker FAMILY RESEARCHER  
Walker/Kern Families
1834 Courtney Mead WALKER: m'd Margaret MCTAVISH. Walker started out with Wyeth's second expedition but dropped out in the Rocky Mountains to trap.  In 1834 he was one of three lay persons who joined the Methodist Mmissionary party of Jason Lee.  During his lifetime he was a teacher, Indian Agent and surveyor.  Walker is buried in an unmarked grave in Blaine, Tillamook Co, OR

1838 Rev. Elkanah WALKER (1805-1877): m'd 1838 Mary Richardson. Walker was a Congregationalist Missionary who came out in 1838 to serve at the Tshimiakain mission at Colville.   He opened a saw and grist mill near Willamette Falls using lumber supplied by Dr. John McLoughlin and then in 1842 contested McLoughlin's claim to land in Oregon City.  Walker died at Forest Grove, Washington Co in 1877.

1833 Joseph Rutherfold WALKER (1798- ): m'd Indian Shoshone. Walker, whose middle name is sometimes seen as Redeford, led an expedition (with Joe Meek) to the Pacific in 1833 by way of the Sierra Nevada .  He fought in the Red Stick War 1814, moved from Tennessee to Missouri with sister Jane and brother Joel in 1819, went to New Mexico 1820-21, to Taos and Santa Fe 1822-23 and to New Mexico with Ewing Young in 1823-25.  Walker was sheriff of Independence, MO 1825-30.  In 1834 he joined Capt. Benjamin Eualie de Bonneville and Michael Cerres on their trip to the Columbia but left them at Bear river to become a trapper.  He went to Arizona in 1837and was a trapper in the Snake and Wind River area 1838-40.  In 1840 Walker led an expedition to Los Angeles.  In 1843 Joseph B. Chiles hired Joe Walker to lead his wagon train party to California. He is credited with being the first white traveler to report the wonders of Yosemite. He was married to a Shoshone girl from c1836-1846.

1811 William WALLACE: Wallace was a clerk and Astorian with the Pacific Fur Company.  He arrived on the Tonquin and later built a house and trading post on the Willamette River near Salem.

1811 John WEEKS: Weeks was a crew member and the carpenter on the Tonquin.

1811 Stephen WEEKS ( -1811): Weeks was a crew member and the armorer on the Tonquin.  He was killed when the ship was attacked by Indians during a trading expedition.

1804 Peter WEISER (1781- ): Weiser was a member of Lewis and Clark's "Corp of Discovery".

1804 Pvt. William WERNER: Werner was a member of Lewis and Clark's "Corp of Discovery". Werner received 25 lashes for disobedience.

1837 Joseph L. WHITCOMB ( -c1843): m'd 1841 Susan Downing (widow of Cyrus Shepard). Whitcomb arrived in May 1837 and was a farm superintendent at the Oregon mission. In 1841 he married Susan Downing, the widow of Cyrus Shepard.  They returned to the states in 1842 on the Brig Chenamus.  Whitcomb died soon after arrival back in Massachusetts.

1837 Dr. Elijah WHITE (1806-1879): m'd Sarepta Unknown.  White arrived in Oregon in May 1837 with his wife, infant son and an adopted son, George, who was 14 years old. He left the Willamette Mission after conflicts with Jason Lee and returned to the states in 1840, determined to have Lee replaced.  The Mission Board disagreed with him.  While in Washington, DC he was commissioned Indian Agent and returned overland to Oregon in 1842.

1804 Isaac WHITE (1774- ): White was a member of Lewis and Clark's "Corp of Discovery".

1811 John WHITE: White was a crew member and sailor on the Tonquin.

1804 Pvt. Joseph WHITEHOUSE (1775- ): Whitehouse was a member of Lewis and Clark's "Corp of Discovery".

1836 Dr. Marcus WHITMAN (1802-1847): m'd Narcissa PRENTISS.  Whitman arrived overland to establish a Presbyterian Mission near Walla Walla, WA.  He was killed in the Whitman Massacre in 1847. *1: MSS#1203, misc papers, letters, accounts available in collection of OHS.

1835 Caleb WILKINS (1810-1890): m'd 1852 Miriam (Stevens) Enyart.  Wilkins was a free trapper with the American Fur Co.  He was listed as a hatter by trade.  In 1840  Wilkins left Fort Hall with Joseph Meek, Francis Ermatinger and Robert Newell to come to Oregon Territory to settle.  He settled first at Benton County but moved to Washington Co where he remained until his death.  He was active in politics in Washington county and served in serveral positions including county treasurer.  He is buried at West Union Cemetery, Hillsboro, Washington Co, OR
"WILKINS, CALEB.--Resides four and a half miles northeast of Hillsboro, and is a farmer by occupation. He was born in Ohio in 1810; was for ten years a trapper in the Rocky Mountains in the employ of the American Fur Company, and one of the earliest pioneers of Oregon. His first settlement in the State was in Benton County; has held office as county treasurer of Washington County for two years. He married Marian Stevens in 1852, and their children are William Lloyd, Alfred C., and Florence." [History of the Willamette Valley by Herbert Lang  p.596]

1804 Pvt. Alexander Hamilton WILLARD (1778-1865): Willard was a member of Lewis and Clark's "Corp of Discovery". Willard received 100 lashes for disobedience.  He was one of the men who made salt at present day Seaside, OR.

1812 Henry WILLETTS:  Willets was an employee of the Pacific Fur Company.  He died of scurvy on the ship Beaver while coming to the Northwest coast.

1837 William Holden WILLSON (1801-1856): m'd 1840 Chloe A. CLARK. Willson arrived in May 1837 as part of the reinforcements for the Willamette Mission. A native of New Hampshire, he worked at a variety of jobs before joining the Mission as a carpenter in 1837.  Willson  resided at Olympia, WA from 1840 to 1842 when he removed to Oregon City.  In 1844 he moved to Salem where his wife was employed at the Oregon Institute as a teacher.  Willson purchased the Chemeketa Mills in Salem and his land claim was situated on what became Salem.

1813 William WILSON: Wilson was a cooper with the Pacific Fur Company.

1804 Pvt. Richard WINDSOR: Windsor was a member of Lewis and Clark's "Corp of Discovery". He was from Fort Kaskaskia and retired to Sangamon River, IL.

1804 Pvt. Peter WISER: Wiser was a member of Lewis and Clark's "Corp of Discovery".

1834 John WORK: John Work was an employee of the Hudson's Bay Co.

1832 John B. WYETH:  John Wyeth was the 18 year old cousin of Nathaniel J. Wyeth.  He was a member of Wyeth's first overland expediton but turned back at edge of Oregon territory. By 1833 he had returned to England.

1832 Nathaniel Jarvis WYETH: Wyeth organized an expedition from Boston to Oregon territory to investigate possiblities of setting up a trading post in 1832.  After exploring the possibilities he returned to Boston to set up a second expedition.  In 1834  Wyeth returned to Oregon and selected a farm site near Lucier, Belleque and McKay.  His main operations were then centered near Sauvie Island where he built headquarters referred to as Fort William.  In 1835 Jason Lee arbitrated a dispute between Wyeth and his men and Wyeth terminated his unsuccessful business adventures and returned overland to Boston in 1836.

1804 YORK: York was the negro servant of Captain William Clark and a member of Lewis and Clark's "Corp of Discovery".

YOUNG FAMILY RESEARCHER
1834 Ewing YOUNG (c1810-1841): Young traveled from Missouri to New Mexico in 1823. In May 1834, he met the Oregon promoter, Hall Jackson Kelley, in southern California and the two, with twelve others came to Oregon in 1834. In 1837 he organized the Willamette Valley Cattle Company to bring cattle from California. In this venture he and ten other settlers were successful, returning with 600 head. After this he became a prominent leader in Oregon. Young left a considerable estate (valued at $5,000) when he died which resulted in the elections of the first supreme judge with probate powers.  He was buried about 6 miles NW of present Newberg, Yamhill Co, OR

BIBLIOGRAPHY


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